Tag Archives: soda

It Was Only a Matter of Time!

10 Mar

For several years now, Americans have been consuming more bottled water and less soda. Now, for the first time, the sales of bottled water exceed those of soda in the United States.

As reported by SCMP:

“Bottled water has been enjoying growth for years, while sales of traditional sodas have declined. Research and consulting firm Beverage Marketing Corp. (BMC) says Americans drank an average of 39.3 gallons of bottled water in 2016, and 38.5 gallons of carbonated soft drinks. In 2015, bottled water was at 36.5 gallons while soda was at 39 gallons.”

“Other industry trackers define drink categories differently, so may see the cross at different times. Beverage Marketing includes sparkling waters in bottled waters and excludes energy drinks in sodas. The reverse is true for another tracker, Beverage Digest, which projects bottled water will surpass soda this year [2017].”

The Shelby Report notes:

“’Bottled water effectively reshaped the beverage marketplace,’ said BMC Chairman and CEO Michael C. Bellas. ‘When Perrier first entered the country in the 1970s, few would have predicted the heights to which bottled water would eventually climb. Where once it would have been unimaginable to see Americans walking down the street carrying plastic bottles of water, or driving around with them in their cars’ cup holders, now that’s the norm. With the exception of two relatively small declines in 2008 and 2009 — when most beverage categories contracted — bottled water volume grew every year from 1977 to 2016. This period included 17 double-digit annual volume growth spurts. Since resuming growth in 2010, bottled water volume has consistently enlarged at solid single-digit percentage rates.’”

 

Fortunately for both Coca-Cola Co. and PepsiCo, they both have popular brands of non-carbonated bottled water, including Dasani, Vitaminwater, and Smartwater from Coca-Cola and Aquafina, Lifewater, and LIFEWTR.

A case of Dasani bottled water. Photo by AFP

 

Brita Water Signs NBA Star Stephen Curry as Endorser

23 Dec

Brita “reduces the taste and odor of chlorine, and other contaminants, to deliver great-tasting water while removing impurities that can cause illness over time.By drinking filtered water, you are reducing the amount of plastic bottles that end up in our landfills and oceans. 1 Brita water filter used = 300 plastic bottles saved.”

It has actively advertised against the health risks of soda, as shown in this YouTube video.
 

 
Now, Brita is looking to up its brand recognition by signing current NBA MVP Stephen Curry to a three-year promotional agreement across various platforms. Curry’s spots will start in January 2016. As Curry said: “Drinking water is essential to a healthy lifestyle. Water is my drink. I like that Brita makes tap water taste good, so you don’t need to spend money or waste plastic with bottled water.”

Click the image to read more.

 

Can “Big Soda” Reverse Its Decline?

30 Oct

The major soda (carbonated beverage) marketers are having a tough go of it some locales where sales are saturated. But an even bigger issue is that many people are turning away from soda because of health concerns.

Recently, the New York Times ran a major story entitled: “The Decline of ‘Big Soda”; it reported that “the drop in soda consumption represents the single largest change in the American diet in the last decade.”

In this story, observed that:

“Even as anti-obesity campaigners have failed to pass soda taxes, they have accomplished something larger. In the course of the fight, they have reminded people that soda is not a very healthy product. They have echoed similar messages coming from public health researchers and others — and fundamentally changed the way Americans think about soda. Over the last 20 years, sales of full-calorie soda in the United States have plummeted by more than 25 percent. Soda consumption, which rocketed from the 1960s through 1990s, is now experiencing a serious and sustained decline.”

“Sales are stagnating as a growing number of Americans say they are actively trying to avoid the drinks that have been a mainstay of American culture. Sales of bottled water have shot up, and bottled water is now on track to overtake soda as the largest beverage category in two years, according to at least one industry projection.”

Click the image to read more.
 

                           Photo by Ruth Fremson/The New York Times


 

Will Calorie Counts Stop the Criticisms Directed at Coke?

17 May

The answer to the question raised in the title above is probably no — especially with the most severe critics of the company and its soft drinks.

Here’s what Coke is planning to do, as reported by Mike Esterl and Paul Ziobro for the Wall Street Journal: “Coca-Cola Co. is broadening distribution of its low-calorie drinks and said it will put calorie counts on the front of its packaging around the world as it ramps up global efforts to counter criticism its sugary drinks are fueling obesity. The beverage giant also promised to sponsor physical activity programs and reiterated its commitment to not market its drinks to children under 12 years old in each of the more than 200 countries and territories that it operates. The moves come as Coke and other soda makers such as PepsiCo Inc. find their products under rising scrutiny in a growing number of countries amid climbing obesity rates. Coke, the world’s biggest drink company, is the main target despite diversifying beyond its namesake cola into dozens of other categories including fruit juices, bottled water, and sports drinks.”

Click the image of Coca-Cola’s CEO Muhtar Kent to read more.

Photo by the Associated Press

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