Tag Archives: bad behavior

Are YOU Doing Enough to Build Your Network?

9 Aug

If you are not heavily involved in professional networking, you are probably doing yourself — and your career — a disservice.

Consider these observations from Lindsay Kolowich, writing for HubSpot:

“When done right, networking is an incredibly valuable investment of every professional’s time and effort. It helps us make meaningful business connections, get feedback, and advance our careers. And best of all, it pays significant dividends over time. So why does it seem so unpleasant sometimes? It can feel fake, it’s exhausting, and frankly, standing alone in a sea of unknown faces with nametags and cheese plates can be utterly painful.”

According to Kolowich, here are common networking mistakes that people make:

  • “You’re waiting to build your network until you need it most.”
  • “You aren’t keeping up your personal brand.”
  • “You’re afraid to attend networking events by yourself.”
  • “You don’t follow up with personal messages.”
  • “You ask the same questions everyone else is asking.”
  • “You dominate networking conversations.”
  • You’re overeager.”
  • You don’t venture outside your existing network.”
  • “You don’t ask for anything, or you ask for too much.”

Click the image to read a lot more.


 

More Bad News on Our Privacy

9 Jun

As we have noted several times (see, for example, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6), the hacking and theft of people’s vital information remains quite rampant around the globe, despite some technological advances.

To show how bad the situation is, consider this recent Russian example reported by Eric Auchaud for Reuters:

“Hundreds of millions of hacked user names and passwords for E-mail accounts and other Web sites are being traded in Russia’s criminal underworld, a security expert told Reuters. The discovery of 272.3 million stolen accounts included a majority of users of Mail.ru, Russia’s most popular E-mail service, and smaller fractions of Google, Yahoo, and Microsoft E-mail users, said Alex Holden, founder and chief information security officer of Hold Security. It is one of the biggest stashes of stolen credentials to be uncovered since cyber attacks hit major U.S. banks and retailers two years ago.”

“The latest discovery came after Hold Security researchers found a young Russian hacker bragging in an online forum that he had collected and was ready to give away a far larger number of stolen credentials that ended up totaling 1.17 billion records. After eliminating duplicates, Holden said, the cache contained nearly 57 million Mail.ru accounts — a big chunk of the 64 million monthly active E-mail users Mail.ru said it had at the end of last year. It also included tens of millions of credentials for the world’s three big E-mail providers, Gmail, Microsoft, and Yahoo, plus hundreds of thousands of accounts at German and Chinese E-mail providers.”

 
Click the image to access a video clip featuring Auchard.
 
Reuters TV
 

Part Two. Being Happier at Work: An Infographic

7 Jun

As we posted yesterday (“Part One. Being Happier in Life: An Infographic”), one of our key life goals should be happiness, a state of well-being and contentment. This applies to our work lives — not just our personal lives. So again, a good starting point is to ask ourselves how happy are we in our career path and in our current job? Do we understand our level of work-related happiness? What can we do to be happier at work?

According to Happify: “What do the people who are most satisfied with their jobs have in common? Learn these insider tips for being happier and more fulfilled during your 9 to 5.”

Check out the Happify infographic on happiness at work.
 

 

Part One. Being Happier in Life: An Infographic

6 Jun

One of our key life goals should be happiness. As defined by Merriam-Webster: Happiness is “a state of well-being and contentment.” So, a good starting point is to ask ourselves how happy are we? Do we understand our level of happiness? What can we do to be happier?

According to Happify:

“If there’s one takeaway from the science of happiness, it’s this: You have the ability to control how you feel — and with consistent practice, you can form life-long habits for a more satisfying and fulfilling life.”

Happify has some interesting free activities and games to help you live a happier, more fulfilling life.

Click the Happify infographic for a larger view.

 

 

All Are Welcome Here

2 May

The American Express OPEN Forum has produced a valuable video, All Are Welcome Here,  based on the acceptance of diversity:

“More than 10,000 small business owners around the country are sending a message. They want their communities to know that all customers are welcome to walk through their doors regardless of religion, country of origin, or immigration status. Amanda Ballantyne of the Main Street Alliance and Elana and Danny Schwartzman, the owners of the Common Roots Café in Minneapolis, tell us about the ‘All Are Welcome Here’ campaign.”

 


 
 
Here is the headline of a poster prepared by the Main Street Alliance.


 

Native Advertising Is Here to Stay. Is This Good?

26 Apr

In recent years, native advertising has been gaining in popularity. According to Sharethrough:

“Native advertising is a form of paid media where the ad experience follows the natural form and function of the user experience in which it is placed. Form — Native ads match the visual design of the experience they live within, and look and feel like natural content. PLUS!! Function — Native ads must behave consistently with the native user experience, and function just like natural content.

Despite the popularity of native advertising, it is a controversial practice. In this post, we are highlighting two videos and two infographics on the subject.

Here’s the view of Jake Ludington (who is experienced in product development, Web development, and producing and distributing videos):

“The New York Times Web site redesign has drawn some complaints because it added native advertising to its site offerings. The two primary arguments against native advertising is that it will potentially compromise editorial integrity or that it isn’t a good long term strategy. Both arguments are largely put forward by working journalists. I don’t see either being a problem.”

 

In Seriously Simple Marketing’s view:

“Native advertising has risen recently and marketers are divided about its use online — some like its creativity and some find it deceiving. Done right, native advertising is a good way to boost your online presence and deliver valuable and relevant content to your audience. So, what makes a good native ad? Here are examples of native advertising done right and examples of native advertising gone bad.”

 
MDG Advertising notes that:

“Advertisers go native in the search for consumer engagement. It’s a simple premise. If you want to engage online consumers, give them more of what they go online for in the first place. Advertisers are doing just that by shifting to paid content that’s similar in nature to and displayed in the same format as the editorial content surrounding it. The idea is to get consumers to click on and then share these ‘native ads’ with others.”


 
Sharethrough, a native advertising specialist, notes that:

“The largest social networks – from Facebook to Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, and Tumblr – have developed their business model around native, in-feed ads. The publishing industry is quickly following suit, as companies such as Time Inc., Forbes, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and USA Today, continue to introduce new advertising integrations on desktop and mobile that match both the form and function of their editorial feeds.”


 

More Gamesmanship on Retail Prices — Even Online

14 Mar

As we wrote a short time ago, companies are not always transparent or honest when they say an item is ‘on sale’ when it really is not: “Unfortunately, many retailers misuse the term ‘sale.’ And shoppers are often persuaded that a product is on sale even when it isn’t.” According to Evans and Berman’s Marketing in the 21st Century: Price advertising guidelines have been set by the FTC and trade associations such as the Better Business Bureau. The FTC’s guidelines set standards of permissible conduct in these categories.”

STILL not convinced that all ‘sales’ really are sales? 

Then, consider these observations from David Streitfeld, writing for the NY Times:

“The perception of a bargain is fostered by online retailers’ use of something variously labeled list price, suggested price, reference price, or manufacturer’s suggested retail price. Whatever its name, the implication is that people are paying much more somewhere else. But with many products online, you could not pay the list price even if you wanted to. That is because hardly anyone is actually charging it. It is a sales tactic that is drawing legal scrutiny, as well as prompting questions about the integrity of E-commerce. If everyone is getting a deal, is anyone really getting a deal?”

“Here is one recent example of how retailers use list prices to motivate online buyers: Le Creuset’s iron-handle skillet, 11 ¾ inches wide and cherry in color. Amazon said that it would knock $60 off the $260 list price to sell the skillet for $200. Sounds like a bargain, the sort of deal that has helped propel Amazon to over $100 billion in annual revenue. Check around, though. The suggested price for the skillet at Williams-Sonoma.com is $285, but customers can buy it for $200. At AllModern.com, the list price is $250 but its sale price is $200. AtCutleryandMore.com, the list price is $285 and the sale price is $200. An additional 15 or so online retailers charge $200. On Le Creuset’s own site, it sells the pan for $200.”

 

Click the image to read more from the NYT.

A Le Creuset 11¾-inch skillet sold for $200 at more than a dozen Web sites, but the list prices they quoted varied. Photo Credit :Gretchen Ertl for The New York Times

 

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