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A Clever Ad: Coke and Recycling

17 Aug

In Great Britain, Coca-Cola has been running an entertaining and clever commercial to encourage recycling. Below are two videos: one that shows the commercial itself and another that describes the making of the ad.

As reported by Alexandra Jardine for Advertising Age:

“Coca-Cola Great Britain is encouraging people to think more about recycling with an animated film, portraying a love story between a plastic Coke and Fanta bottle, that is crafted entirely out of recyclable packaging. The set for ‘Love Story,’ by Ogilvy & Mather Berlin, was created by Berlin-based duo Cris Wiegandt and Lacy Barry who used more than 1,500 Coca-Cola, Fanta, Sprite, Smartwater, and Honest bottles and cans during production. In the story, the two plastic bottles banter about their romance, and how they kept giving another a ‘second chance’ after being recycled again and again.”

 

 

 

Customer Returns

24 Jul

Here’s another interesting and fun YouTube video from Planet Dolan. This one deals with some of the more “out there” reasons that people have given for returning products. What’s YOUR most unusual customer return experience?
 
 

 

Are YOU Buying These Scam Products?

17 Jul

Are YOU susceptible to buying products that over-promise their benefits or are otherwise deceptive?

In this video from Planet Dolan, do you agree that these are all scam products? [Note: The Planet Dolan YouTube channel has 5.5 million subscribers. and 1.4 billions views]
 

 

 

Prof. Joel Evans’ YouTube Channel

11 Jul
Follow me at Pinterest and YouTube.

 
Source: Prof. Joel Evans’ YouTube Channel
 

Cybercrime Costs How Much?

6 Jul

The extent of cybercrime continues to explode, as we have noted before (see, for example, 1, 2, 3).

Consider the following:

  • Interpol describes the types of cybercrime that exist — “Cybercrime is a fast-growing area of crime. More and more criminals are exploiting the speed, convenience, and anonymity of the Internet to commit a diverse range of criminal activities that know no borders, either physical or virtual, cause serious harm, and pose very real threats to victims worldwide. Although there is no single universal definition of cybercrime, law enforcement generally makes a distinction between two main types of Internet-related crime: advanced cybercrime (or high-tech crime) – sophisticated attacks against computer hardware and software; and cyber-enabled crime – many ‘traditional’ crimes have taken a new turn with the advent of the Internet, such as crimes against children, financial crimes, and even terrorism.
  • David Sun reports that “Just last year [2016], cybercrime cost the global economy over $450 billion U.S., and this number is only expected to grow, with estimates that it will hit $3 trillion U.S. by 2020.” Also, click here for more from Sun.
  •  Verizon has published a 100-page PDF report (“Data Breach Digest”). Click here to access the full report.
  • Europol has published a 57-page PDF report (subtitled “Crime in the Age of Technology”).  Click here to access the full report.
  • Symantec has published a 77-page PDF report (“Internet Security Threat Report “).  Click here to access the full report.

 

 

Do YOU Understand YOUR Credit Report?

27 Jun

As shoppers and as marketers, we know that an individual’s credit score is very important in determining the rate of interest a person pays for a credit card or loan transaction, how much they are able to buy on credit (the spending limit), etc. An excellent rating is an important guide for both shoppers and buyers. But, do we know how a credit rating is computed?
 
Here is a good video overview from Barclaycard U.S..
 

 

Will Companies Be Ready for Europe’s General Data Protection Rule?

22 Jun

In the United States, consumer privacy rules are not as strong as they are in other areas of the world. Recently, the U.S. Congress voted to overturn a pending regulation that would require Internet service providers (ISPs) to obtain people’s permission before selling their data about them. President Trump then signed the rollback.

As reported by NPR.org:

“The reversal is a victory for ISPs, which have argued that the regulation would put them at a disadvantage compared with so-called edge providers, like Google and Facebook. Those firms are regulated by the Federal Trade Commission and face less stringent requirements. ISPs collect huge amounts of data on the Web sites people visit, including medical, financial, and other personal information. The FCC regulation would have required ISPs to ask permission before selling that information to advertisers and others, a so-called opt-in provision.”

In contrast to the U.S. approach to privacy, Europe has a sweeping new regulation that will take effect in May 2018. It will have an impact on companies based anywhere, including the United States.

Brian Wallace, reporting for CMS Wire, describes the General Data Protection Rule (GDPR), thusly. Be sure to read the material highlighted:

“The European Parliament passed the General Data Protection Rule (GDPR) in April 2016. The law is one of the most sweeping privacy laws protecting citizens ever to be put on the books, and is scheduled to take effect on May 25, 2018. One of the most misunderstood things about this law is that it covers EU citizen data, no matter which country the company using it is located. This means that any company in the world that stores EU citizen protected data has less than a year to come into compliance with the GDPR.

According to the GDPR’s Web site, “The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) replaces the Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC and was designed to harmonize data privacy laws across Europe, to protect and empower all EU citizens data privacy, and to reshape the way organizations across the region approach data privacy. The GDPR protects personal data and sensitive personal data. This includes: sensitive data: name, location, identification numbers, IP address, cookies, RFID info; and sensitive personal data: health data, genetic data, biometric data, racial or ethnic data, political opinions, and sexual orientation.

 

Take a look at the following infographic from Digital Guardian to learn more! Click the image for a larger version.


 

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