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Are You Vigilant in Protecting Your Reputation?

22 Feb

Whether we are reviewing our company’s reputation or our own personal self-brand, the results may be challenging because of the spread of fake news and the proliferation of negative social media comments. What we hope for perceptions of our reputation may not be in sync with the way others see us. And having a favorable reputation is critically important.

What can we do to have a well-respected reputation? Consider these suggestions from Sapir Segal, writing for Marketo:

Social media marketing requires a lot of patience and maintenance. Once you’ve established your social media presence and are generating engagement and measuring your ROI, the most important stage is to protect your hard work. Monitoring and protecting your social media presence from decline or extinction is just as pivotal as demonstrating it in the first place.”

“Controversial posts, account hacks, and inadvertent mistakes are all examples of threats that could harm your brand’s reputation. Luckily for marketers, many of these troubling factors are avoidable or correctable. To protect your social media reputation, you must have a careful eye for potential problems, a plan for handling crises, and a team you trust to write and manage the content. Here are three common mistakes that plague social media marketers: (1) unsupervised content publishing; (2) controversial content; and (3) account hacking.”

 

Click the image to read Segal’s solutions to these problems!

 

How Big a Hurdle Is Ad Blocking in 2017?

17 Feb

Ad blocking is becoming an enormous problem for online marketers, going from a nuisance a couple of years ago to a major threat today. ARE YOU PREPARED TO HANDLE IT?

Technopedia describes ad blockers as follows:

“An ad blocker is a program that will remove different kinds of advertising from a Web user’s experience online. These programs target certain kinds of ads, such as pop-ups, banner ads ,and other common forms of online ad blockers work in many different ways. Some are standalone programs, while others are features of more comprehensive customizing services, or add-ons for a particular browser or operating system. Some browser-specific programs, like PithHelmet for Safari, or other programs for browsers, like Opera, are designed to work well in a particular environment. Others work with Windows or another operating system to block pop-ups or other kinds of ads.”

“Users have a wide range of options for blocking out different kinds of ads. Some programs delete cookies and other Web markers to effectively limit ads. Web proxy programs like Privoxy can be effective ad blockers. Some users will choose to block Adobe Flash in order to block annoying video ads, which are now common on some websites. There are also freeware programs that may use simple principles to block out advertising.”

So, how much of a threat is ad blocking in 2017? Even though eMarketer has scaled back its estimates slightly; ad blocking is still growing significantly. As eMarketer notes:

“eMarketer has scaled back its estimates of ad blocking users in the U.S., reducing the number to 75.1 million. At that level, more than one-quarter (27.5%) of US internet users will use ad blockers this year. While the estimate has been reduced, growth is still significant, at 16.2% in 2017.”

“Ad blocking is much more common among desktop/laptop users than smartphone users. For smartphones, the incidence of ad blocking is less than 8%. That’s partly because mobile ad blockers are often not as effective — especially within apps — as they are on desktops and laptops. Ad blocking continues to be far more prevalent among younger people. This year, 41.1% of millennials will use ad blockers, r estimates. The use is lower among Gen X internet users at 26.9%, and for baby boomers, ad blocking is at 13.9%.”

 
Click the image to read more.

US Ad Blocking User Penetration, Desktop/Laptop vs. Smartphone, 2014-2018 (% of population)

 

What Was Hot in 1997?

16 Feb

We tend to spend a lot of time looking at the “hot new things,” such as connected vehicles, virtual assistants, and a lot more. But, as marketers, we seldom look back to the past to see what was hot then in terms of fads and long-running successes. What hot high-tech products from 20 years ago can YOU name?

Recently, CNET published an entertaining slideshow: “Flashback fun! Return with us now to the thrilling days of the late 1990s, when the Interweb was young, the CD was king, and the cloud was a white, fluffy thing that floated above your head while you gabbed on your cordless telephone.”

 

Click the image to see the CNET slideshow. Which of the items shown in the slideshow were fads; which were long-run successes?


 

Connected Vehicles Generate BIG Data

14 Feb

This post is a follow-up to yesterday’s.

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As we know, the auto industry is in the midst of a major technological revolution. Although self-driving vehicles have garnered a huge amount of attention, “connected” vehicles will also have an enormous impact on marketing. Why? From the consumer’s point of view, connectivity means better Bluetooth interactivity, GPS systems, entertainment systems, roadside assistance, diagnostics, and more. From the seller’s point of view, connectivity means access to lots of big data.

Consider these observations from Felix Richter, writing for Statista:

“Modern cars are equipped with more than 100 sensors that create a constant stream of data. Measuring things like location, performance, physical parameters, and driving behavior, often several times per second, the amount of data generated by these sensors is immense. According to a McKinsey estimate, connected cars create up to 25 gigabytes of data per hour. That’s the equivalent of nearly 30 hours of HD video playback and more than a month’s worth of 24-hour music streaming.”

“According to the analysts in charge of our Digital Market Outlook, the data created by connected cars have a lot of potential in terms of monetization. Think insurance companies for example, who would likely be willing to pay good money to find out more about our driving habits. For more information about this exciting new market, please download our free market report Connected Car: Vehicle Services.”

 
Take a look at this chart to see how big the data collected from connected vehicles really are.


 

Which Elements of YOUR Emotional Intelligence Do YOU Need to Improve?

9 Feb

Emotional intelligence is a concept we should understand as marketers and in our own personal terms. According to Psychology Today, emotional intelligence is “the ability to identify and manage your own emotions and the emotions of others. It is generally said to include three skills: (1) Emotional awareness, including the ability to identify your own emotions and those of others. (2) The ability to harness emotions and apply them to tasks like thinking and problems solving. (3) The ability to manage emotions, including the ability to regulate your own emotions, and the ability to cheer up or calm down another person.”

Daniel Goleman and Richard E. Boyatzis, writing for Harvard Business Review, describe emotional intelligence in some depth:

“There are many models of emotional intelligence, each with its own set of abilities; they are often lumped together as ‘EQ’ in the popular vernacular. We prefer ‘EI,’ which we define as comprising four domains: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management. Nested within these domains are twelve EI competencies, learned and learnable capabilities that allow outstanding performance at work or as a leader . These include areas in which we are clearly strong: empathy, positive outlook, and self-control. But they also include crucial abilities such as achievement, influence, conflict management, teamwork and inspirational leadership. These skills require just as much engagement with emotions as the first set, and should be just as much a part of any aspiring leader’s development priorities.”

 

The twelve EI competencies are highlighted by More Than Sound. WHICH OF THEM ARE YOUR STRENGTHS AND WHICH OF THEM DO YOU NEED TO IMPROVE?

Self-Awareness (1) Emotional Self-Awareness:  “Emotionally self-aware leaders not only can be candid and authentic, they also can speak with conviction about their vision.”

Self-Management — (2) Emotional Self-Control: Leaders with self-control stay calm and clear-headed while under stress or during a crisis and maintain emotional balance.” (3) Achievement Orientation: “Leaders who have high standards for themselves and for others set measurable but challenging goals.” (4) Positive Outlook: Such a leader see others positively, and still expects the best of them (with a ‘glass half-full’ outlook).” (5) Adaptability: “This leader can juggle multiple demands, but remain focused on a group’s goals.”

Social Awareness (6) Empathy: “Such leaders listen attentively while understanding other’s perspectives, get along well with people of diverse backgrounds and cultures, and express their ideas in ways others understand.” (7) Organizational Awareness: “This leader can detect networking opportunities, read key power relationships, and understand the guiding values and unspoken rules that operate among people.”

Relationship Management — (8) Influence: “These leaders know how to appeal to others and how to build buy-in from key people.” (9) Coach and Mentor: “This leader has a genuine interest in helping others, and gives timely and constructive feedback to coworkers.” (10) Conflict Management: “They take time to understand different perspectives and work to find a common ground upon which everyone can agree.” (11) Inspirational Leadership:  “They articulate a shared mission in a way that inspires others to follow.” (12) Teamwork: “These leaders create an atmosphere of respect, helpfulness, and cooperation.”

 

 

Fortune’s 2017 Crystal Ball

8 Feb

Each year, Fortune magazine presents an interesting series of predictions for the coming year.

The 2017 “crystal ball” is based on these principles (and includes the use of IBM Watson 🙂 ):

“The election of Donald Trump to the presidency represents a seismic shift in American politics, an event with implications nearly impossible to predict. One casualty of the election, indeed, may be the science of prediction itself. For all their algorithmic gymnastics, pollsters and betting markets were utterly confounded by Trump’s win. Which is why it’s essential to have a prediction tool that relies as much on art (and whimsy) as it does on science. And this year, for some extra insight, we’ve even teamed up with artificial-intelligence powerhouse IBM Watson, which mined tens of millions of sources to help us spot hidden trends. Here, we offer our well-informed, intuitive take on the stories that will shape business—and much else—in the coming year.”

Fortune’s 2017 predictions are divided into several categories:

  • Techno-Futurism
  • Politics
  • Economy
  • The World
  • Trendsetters
  • More Companies Tie the Knot
  • Where Fortune Is Placing Its Bets
  • How We Did in 2016

 

Click the image to read the 2017 predictions.


 

Rating the Super Bowl Ads: What’s YOUR Take?

7 Feb

From a sports perspective, Super Bowl LI was an exciting football game — the first one ever going into overtime. But was this Super Bowl an advertising success? The reviews of the ads are mixed. [Click here to access all of the ads.]

Consider these observations from

“The New England Patriots’ furious comeback victory over the Atlanta Falcons must have felt like a relief to the National Football League and many of its fans, if only because it squarely turned the focus and conversation back to football. That came at the close of a Super Bowl where commercials that once would have seemed relatively innocuous felt provocative thanks to the polarized political climate.”

“Super Bowl ads featuring images of multiculturalism and inclusiveness are hardly new — sponsors like to appeal to wide audiences with feel-good imagery. Even so, amid all the acrimony over government policies, several commercials risked becoming lightning rods, including a Budweiser ad that dared to trace founder Adolphus Busch’s immigrant roots and a Coca-Cola spot that offered ‘America the Beautiful’ in different languages.”

“[Nonetheless, for the most part], the much-ballyhooed commercials yielded as few highlights as New England’s offense did during the first half.”

 

Each year, Advertising Age runs an online post-game poll whereby anyone can vote on the question: “Which Super Bowl Ad Was the Best?” As of Monday night, the following ads were rated the best by those participating in the Ad Age poll. In addition to listing the best ads (in the order of the Ad Age poll results), we are providing the ads themselves. WHAT DO YOU THINK?

 

Airbnb “We Accept”

 

84 Lumber “The Journey Begins”

 

Audi “Daughter”

 

Bai Brands “Gentlemen”

 

Budweiser “Born the Hard Way”

 

Mr. Clean “Cleaner of Your Dreams”

 

Honda “Yearbooks”

 

Kia “Hero’s Journey”

 

Tide “Bradshaw Stain”

 

 

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