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2017 Marketing Hall of Fame Inductee: Gary Briggs

14 Jun

Each year, the American Marketing Association New York inducts outstanding marketers into the Marketing Hall of Fame for their significant lifetime achievements:

“The Marketing Hall of Fame is the only award which recognizes individual marketers (not companies or campaigns) who have made outstanding contributions to the field of marketing. Individuals are eligible be they corporate CMOs or VPs of Marketing; agency marketers — advertising, branding, research etc.; or  academics, journalists, and other marketing experts. Nominees must have been in the marketing profession for at least 10 years and be a current marketing practitioner. Our primary focus is on, but not limited to, the U.S. The Marketing Hall of Fame Judging Panel is an exclusive group of CEO’s and thought leaders. Judges review and vote on the short list of finalists. We’re pleased to have this distinguished panel of experts involved in the inductee voting process.

“This year’s inductees are Gary Briggs, Vice-President, Chief Marketing Officer, Facebook; Jon Iwata, Senior Vice-President, Marketing and Communications, IBM; Jim Stengel, former Global Marketing Officer, Procter & Gamble and President/CEO, The Jim Stengel Company, and Jerry Wind, Ph.D., Professor of Marketing, The Wharton School.”

 

Today’s video is from Gary Briggs’ Hall of Fame induction speech. There are several career and marketing observations in this presentation.

 

 

The Unique Back Story of Warby Parker

12 Jun

Warby Parker is a highly successful online — and now store-based — marketer of eyeglasses and sunglasses (“Prescription eyeglasses, starting at $95, with free shipping and free returns.”). As it notes on its Web site:

“Warby Parker was founded with a rebellious spirit and a lofty goal: to offer designer eyewear at a revolutionary price, while leading the way for socially conscious businesses. Every idea starts with a problem. Ours was simple: glasses are too expensive. We were students when one of us lost his glasses. The cost of replacing them was so high that he spent the first semester of grad school without them, squinting and complaining. The rest of us had similar experiences, and we were amazed at how hard it was to find a pair of great frames that didn’t leave our wallets bare. Where were the options?”

“There was a simple explanation. The eyewear industry is dominated by a company that has been able to keep prices artificially high while reaping huge profits from consumers who have no options. We started Warby Parker to create an alternative. By circumventing traditional channels, designing glasses in-house, and engaging with customers directly, we’re able to provide higher-quality, better-looking prescription eyewear at a fraction of the going price. We believe that buying glasses should be easy and fun. It should leave you happy and good-looking, with money in your pocket.”

“We also believe that everyone has the right to see. Almost one billion people worldwide lack access to glasses, which means that 15% of the world’s population cannot effectively learn or work. To help address this problem, Warby Parker partners with non-profits like VisionSpring to ensure that for every pair of glasses sold, a pair is distributed to someone in need.”

 
Take a look at this Inc. video featuring Warby Parker founder Neil Blumenthal.

 

Bose Sued for Privacy Violations

30 May

We’ve posted many times about privacy issues (click here). But there’s a new lawsuit against Bose that could reshape the legal landscape for a number of companies. The video below is a good synopsis of the Bose matter.

Two questions for you: (1) Do you think Bose will modify its policies and negotiate a settlement before the case makes it to court? (2) If the case goes to trial, who do you think will prevail? GIVE US YOUR ANSWERS THROUGH A POST COMMENT.
 

 
 

Waymo Vs. Uber: Self-Driving Car Intellectual Property Rights

25 May

Waymo (part of Alphabet — the parent of Google) and Uber are now engaged in an intense legal battle about intellectual property rights regarding self-driving technology. This battle was enjoined when Uber hired away a leading technologist from Waymo.

As reported by Knowledge@Wharton:

“A federal judge’s orders last week in a lawsuit by Google’s parent company, Alphabet, against ride-hailing app company Uber may have launched a major rethink on how the automobile industry braces for competition and protects its intellectual property (IP). Alphabet subsidiary Waymo had accused Uber of stealing trade secrets and patent infringement by hiring Anthony Levandowski, an engineer who formerly led Google’s driverless car project, and buying a firm he had founded after leaving Google.”

“Judge William Alsup of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California ordered Levandowski to turn over some 14,000 documents he allegedly downloaded before he left Google and granted a preliminary injunction Waymo sought to prevent Uber from using know-how Levandowski brought to the firm. Judge Alsup also referred the case for a federal criminal investigation. Uber has since taken Levandowski off its driverless car project and asked him to comply with the court order or risk termination of his job. Meanwhile, Levandowski has remained silent on the matter, citing the Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination.”

 

Here is an interesting 30-minute podcast on this matter, featuring Wharton’s John Paul MacDuffie, Santa Clara University’s Dorothy Glancy, and University of Pennsylvania’s R. Polk Wagner.

 

 

Another Technological Innovation from Amazon

3 May

Not only is Amazon the leader in online retailing overall, it continues to develop innovative technology. Among its already popular innovations are the Kindle, Kindle Fire, TV Fire Stick, and Echo (Alexa).

Due to its getting more heavily involved in apparel retailing, Amazon has just patented a unique new technology-driven, custom-clothing process.

As Nick Wingfield reports for the New York Times:

“This year, Amazon will surpass Macy’s to become the largest seller of apparel in America, by several analysts’ estimates. It is looking at ways to keep expanding, too. Amazon is exploring the possibility of selling custom-fit clothing, tailored to the more precise measurements of customers, and it has considered acquiring clothing manufacturers to further expand its presence in the category.”

“If there are tipping points in retail — moments when shopping behavior swings decisively in one direction — there’s a strong case to be made that apparel is reaching one now, with broad implications for jobs, malls, and shopping districts.”

Also for the New York Times, Wingfield and Kelly Couturier describe Amazon’s customization effort:

“In April [2017], Amazon received an intriguing patent for an ‘on demand’ apparel manufacturing system, which can quickly fill online orders for suits, dresses and other garments. Here’s how it would work. (1) The process starts when customers submit online orders to the retailer for shirts and other articles of clothing, accessories, bedding, curtains, and towels. The patterns, printed onto rolls of fabric or other material, are arranged to reduce scrap.”

“(2) A “cut engine” then carves out the various pattern pieces, while cameras analyze them to make sure they aren’t being distorted in the process. (3) A robotic arm with a mechanical gripper places all the pieces into a tote on a conveyor belt. (4) The conveyor belt delivers the totes to a sewing station, where ‘an attendant and/or automated sewing machine’ stitches the item together. The items are then examined at a quality control station, packed up and shipped to customers.”

 

Click the image for many other figures that visually highlight Amazon’s customization process.

Source: Amazon 

 

Amazing But True: Netflix More Popular Than DVR

17 Mar

For years, cable and satellite TV service providers have used the DVR as a major competitive advantage. But, today, streaming services are changing the playing field. To the dismay of TV service providers, channels, and their advertisers, a huge number of customers are cutting the TV cord and turning to Amazon, Netflix, and other streaming subscriptions for their content — aided by smart TV sets as well as plug-in devices that can allow people to stream video content on their sets.

It may be hard to believe, given the dominance of the DVR just a few years ago, but today, slightly more U.S. households (and growing) have access to Netflix than to a DVR — according to Leichtman Research Group. The Leichtman study findings are summarized in the following Statista chart.
 

 

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