Tag Archives: trends

What’s Ahead for the Subscription Box Service?

13 Mar

Are subscription boxes a fad or sustainable business model? According to Jameson Morris, a specialist in the field: “A subscription box is a recurring, physical delivery of niche-oriented products packaged as an experience and designed to offer additional value on top of the actual retail products contained in a box.”

Morrison further notes that to be considered a subscription box service, these elements are needed: 

“Must be a physical delivery (digital subscriptions can’t be classified as a subscription box). 

Must be a recurring subscription/membership (of any term or frequency). 

Must feature one or more of the following value propositions:

Surprise (at least 1 or more items in the box must be unknown to the customer before delivery). Discovery (slightly different than ‘Surprise’. Discovery-oriented subscriptions don’t have to have ‘mystery’ items, it’s more about consumers ‘discovering’ items they’ve never seen before).

Curation (a thoughtfully picked variety of products related to a specific niche or category). 

Savings (a clear savings on the price paid for the box versus the total retail value of the items inside). 

Thoughtful Presentation (From custom packaging to the way products are arranged inside the box). 

Convenience (convenience cannot be implied solely by the fact that it’s a recurring ‘auto-delivery’. Rather, think of the fresh ingredient subscription boxes like Blue Apron or Green Chef–they deliver convenience in the form of pre-prepared ingredients and recipes).”

 

According to eMarketer:

“A March survey from AYTM Market Research of 1,000 US consumers showed that while a little over half of respondents said they have used at least one subscription service, almost two-fifths who had used one said they had canceled.”

“’To stay the distance, brands using a subscription model need a very strong point of difference and superior customer service,’ said Sarah Boumphrey, global lead of economies and consumers at Euromonitor International. She added that subscription services also need to come up with other avenues of revenue. For instance, Birchbox, a leader in the space, has brick-and-mortar stores.”

“Differentiation will be even more crucial, as there are signs that suggest the industry’s growth is slowing. Traffic to subscription service sites in January rose 18%, according to Hitwise. Though that’s healthy growth, it’s well off the 56% gain registered a year earlier.”

 
Click the image to read more.


 

Looking for Marketing Salary Information?

1 Mar

We’ve talked before about salary information sites such as PayScale. Today, we’re highlighting another valuable salary guide — Good Calculators.

At  the salary calculator section of the site, you can learn salaries by state, occupation, and career, and all occupations by region.

Here are several marketing career salary examples from Good Calculators. [PLEASE NOTE: In reviewing these numbers, please keep in mind that they refer to specific careers. In each state, all of the careers illustrated below are available!]

  • Arizona, management occupations, food service managers — average annual salary = $55,010; average hourly salary = $26.45; no. of employees: 3,360
  • California, management occupations, marketing managers — average annual salary = $161,640; average hourly salary = $77.71; no. of employees: 32,800
  • Florida, management occupations, lodging managers — average annual salary = $64,980; average hourly salary = $31.24; no. of employees: 3,430
  • Illinois, management occupations, public relations and fundraising managers — average annual salary = $107,060; average hourly salary = $51.47; no. of employees: 3,210
  • Maryland, sales and related occupations, advertising sales agents — average annual salary = $61,760; average hourly salary = $29.69; no. of employees: 1,260
  • New York, management occupations, marketing managers — average annual salary = $186,940; average hourly salary = $89.88; no. of employees: 14,860
  • North Carolina, sales and related occupations, real-estate brokers — average annual salary = $60,010; average hourly salary = $28.85; no. of employees: 6,020
  • Ohio, management occupations, sales managers — average annual salary = $124,960; average hourly salary = $60.08; no. of employees: 12,140
  • Pennsylvania, management occupations, purchasing managers — average annual salary = $117,960; average hourly salary = $56.71; no. of employees: 1,820
  • South Carolina, sales and related occupations, securities/financial services brokers — average annual salary = $92,940; average hourly salary = $44.68; no. of employees: 1,410
  • Texas, sales and related occupations, first-line supervisors of non-retail sales workers — average annual salary = $84,730; average hourly salary = $40.74; no. of employees: 25,630

 
To learn A LOT MORE about salary possibilities by state, occupation, and career, click the image.


 

How Big a Hurdle Is Ad Blocking in 2017?

17 Feb

Ad blocking is becoming an enormous problem for online marketers, going from a nuisance a couple of years ago to a major threat today. ARE YOU PREPARED TO HANDLE IT?

Technopedia describes ad blockers as follows:

“An ad blocker is a program that will remove different kinds of advertising from a Web user’s experience online. These programs target certain kinds of ads, such as pop-ups, banner ads ,and other common forms of online ad blockers work in many different ways. Some are standalone programs, while others are features of more comprehensive customizing services, or add-ons for a particular browser or operating system. Some browser-specific programs, like PithHelmet for Safari, or other programs for browsers, like Opera, are designed to work well in a particular environment. Others work with Windows or another operating system to block pop-ups or other kinds of ads.”

“Users have a wide range of options for blocking out different kinds of ads. Some programs delete cookies and other Web markers to effectively limit ads. Web proxy programs like Privoxy can be effective ad blockers. Some users will choose to block Adobe Flash in order to block annoying video ads, which are now common on some websites. There are also freeware programs that may use simple principles to block out advertising.”

So, how much of a threat is ad blocking in 2017? Even though eMarketer has scaled back its estimates slightly; ad blocking is still growing significantly. As eMarketer notes:

“eMarketer has scaled back its estimates of ad blocking users in the U.S., reducing the number to 75.1 million. At that level, more than one-quarter (27.5%) of US internet users will use ad blockers this year. While the estimate has been reduced, growth is still significant, at 16.2% in 2017.”

“Ad blocking is much more common among desktop/laptop users than smartphone users. For smartphones, the incidence of ad blocking is less than 8%. That’s partly because mobile ad blockers are often not as effective — especially within apps — as they are on desktops and laptops. Ad blocking continues to be far more prevalent among younger people. This year, 41.1% of millennials will use ad blockers, r estimates. The use is lower among Gen X internet users at 26.9%, and for baby boomers, ad blocking is at 13.9%.”

 
Click the image to read more.

US Ad Blocking User Penetration, Desktop/Laptop vs. Smartphone, 2014-2018 (% of population)

 

Connected Vehicles Generate BIG Data

14 Feb

This post is a follow-up to yesterday’s.

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As we know, the auto industry is in the midst of a major technological revolution. Although self-driving vehicles have garnered a huge amount of attention, “connected” vehicles will also have an enormous impact on marketing. Why? From the consumer’s point of view, connectivity means better Bluetooth interactivity, GPS systems, entertainment systems, roadside assistance, diagnostics, and more. From the seller’s point of view, connectivity means access to lots of big data.

Consider these observations from Felix Richter, writing for Statista:

“Modern cars are equipped with more than 100 sensors that create a constant stream of data. Measuring things like location, performance, physical parameters, and driving behavior, often several times per second, the amount of data generated by these sensors is immense. According to a McKinsey estimate, connected cars create up to 25 gigabytes of data per hour. That’s the equivalent of nearly 30 hours of HD video playback and more than a month’s worth of 24-hour music streaming.”

“According to the analysts in charge of our Digital Market Outlook, the data created by connected cars have a lot of potential in terms of monetization. Think insurance companies for example, who would likely be willing to pay good money to find out more about our driving habits. For more information about this exciting new market, please download our free market report Connected Car: Vehicle Services.”

 
Take a look at this chart to see how big the data collected from connected vehicles really are.


 

The State of Big Data in 2017

13 Feb

As we have noted several times over the years (see for example: 1, 2, 3), big data are an important element of the marketer’s toolbox. So, what is the state of big data in 2017?

Recently, eMarketer published its Big Data Roundup for 2017:

“Most key objectives of marketers are rooted in big data, from targeting and customer relationship management to attribution — and even artificial intelligence. eMarketer has curated this Roundup of articles, insights, and interviews to help you understand why and how advertisers and marketers are putting these large, complex data sets to work.”

 

“Big data are gradually becoming a part of U.S. business, and companies that are able to take advantage of their scope and complexity appear to be seeing benefits. In January 2017, research from NewVantage Partners  revealed that at least half of organizations are incorporating some type of big data initiative. Not all areas businesspeople were polled on got high marks. Of the big data initiatives executives were asked about, establishing a data-driven culture and making over their business for the future had the lowest success rates, both at 27.9%.”

 

Click the image to view the Roundup report.

 

How the Global Population Is Evolving

10 Feb
For many marketers, understanding the shifts in the global population is imperative. Take a look at this video to learn more.

 


 

The Popularity of Marketing Internships: Be Prepared and Don’t Wait!

6 Feb

Internships provide great opportunities for real-world experiences, a great addition to a resume, and contacts for future employment. DID YOU KNOW that marketing-related internships are among the most popular by companies? This augurs well for a career in marketing. 🙂

First, consider this:  Research by Burning Glass Technologies shows that:

“More than ever there is a narrow season for internship recruitment. That season peaks in March – ahead of when many students begin to think about summer opportunities. And employers expect interns to arrive already equipped with knowledge of critical skills in software and other areas that enable them to be productive on the first day. If you wait until the end of the semester to get an internship, you have waited too long. Recruiting for internships begins in January and peaks in March. Then demand begins to taper off sharply. There is a small second bump in September for term-time internships as the school year begins.” The concentration of postings in March has increased steadily over the past five years. In March 2016, there were 29,360 internships posted, an 11% increase over the 2011-2015 average, and a 2% increase over the 28,796 postings in March 2015.

“The total number of internships posted in 2016 was 216,333.”

 

Of the top 20 U.S. internship fields, FIVE of the most popular six are marketing-related. As reported by the New York Times, Burning Glass found the following internship popularity in its research [Marketing-related is denoted by color.]:

1. BUSINESS OPERATIONS (Internship postings from September 2015 to October 2016: 58,949) — Most in-demand skills: Project management, business administration, scheduling, customer service, economics

2. MARKETING (Internship postings from September 2015 to October 2016: 35,498) — Most in-demand skills: Social media, marketing, Adobe Photoshop, Facebook, market research

4. SALES AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT (Internship postings from September 2015 to October 2016: 28,227) — Most in-demand skills: Sales, business development, marketing, customer service, project management

5. MEDIA, COMMUNICATIONS, PUBLIC RELATIONS (Internship postings from September 2015 to October 2016: 28,140) — Most in-demand skills: Social media, journalism, Adobe Photoshop, marketing, technical writing and editing

6. DATA ANALYTICS (Internship postings from September 2015 to October 2016: 26,438) — Most in-demand skills: Data analysis, data collection, market research, mathematics, project management

 

Click the image to read Burning Glass Technologies full report.

 

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