Tag Archives: trends

Do YOU Trust Companies with Your Personal Data?

20 Apr

We know that there have been incidents of stolen data around the world. These are involuntary hacks of our personal information. So, how do we feel about voluntarily sharing our information with companies? Many of us are rather reluctant to share more personal data due to concerns about identity theft, access to private information, and more.

As reported by eMarketer:

“A Pew Research Center report published in January 2017 found that only 14% of US consumers felt ‘very confident’ about entrusting companies/retailers with their data. Almost the exact same number said they were not at all confident.”

 

 

Movie Milestones

12 Apr

The movie industry is always looking for new ways to maximize revenues and create buzz with the public. With this in mind, WatchMojo has a fun new video on the top game-changing Hollywood films:

“Movies that were so iconic that they created lasting and deep trends that changed the way films are made, through their stories, special effects, and CGI. WatchMojo presents the Top 10 Movies that Started Industry Trends. But what will take the top spot on our list? X-Men starting the Superhero craze, Jaws creating the need for annual summer blockbusters, or The Avengers starting the shared universe craze? Watch to find out!”

 

 

FREE: 2017 Edition of Careers in Business

11 Apr

Learn about the many opportunities and challenges facing those interested in a career in business. The latest data are included. Lots of data!!
 

Outline of Topics:
  • General Hints
  • Background Data By Occupation
  • Long-term Trends
  • Hot Long-term Business Career Opportunities
  • Bureau Of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook
  • LinkedIn
  • “Find A Job” Resources

 

 

What’s Ahead for the Subscription Box Service?

13 Mar

Are subscription boxes a fad or sustainable business model? According to Jameson Morris, a specialist in the field: “A subscription box is a recurring, physical delivery of niche-oriented products packaged as an experience and designed to offer additional value on top of the actual retail products contained in a box.”

Morrison further notes that to be considered a subscription box service, these elements are needed: 

“Must be a physical delivery (digital subscriptions can’t be classified as a subscription box). 

Must be a recurring subscription/membership (of any term or frequency). 

Must feature one or more of the following value propositions:

Surprise (at least 1 or more items in the box must be unknown to the customer before delivery). Discovery (slightly different than ‘Surprise’. Discovery-oriented subscriptions don’t have to have ‘mystery’ items, it’s more about consumers ‘discovering’ items they’ve never seen before).

Curation (a thoughtfully picked variety of products related to a specific niche or category). 

Savings (a clear savings on the price paid for the box versus the total retail value of the items inside). 

Thoughtful Presentation (From custom packaging to the way products are arranged inside the box). 

Convenience (convenience cannot be implied solely by the fact that it’s a recurring ‘auto-delivery’. Rather, think of the fresh ingredient subscription boxes like Blue Apron or Green Chef–they deliver convenience in the form of pre-prepared ingredients and recipes).”

 

According to eMarketer:

“A March survey from AYTM Market Research of 1,000 US consumers showed that while a little over half of respondents said they have used at least one subscription service, almost two-fifths who had used one said they had canceled.”

“’To stay the distance, brands using a subscription model need a very strong point of difference and superior customer service,’ said Sarah Boumphrey, global lead of economies and consumers at Euromonitor International. She added that subscription services also need to come up with other avenues of revenue. For instance, Birchbox, a leader in the space, has brick-and-mortar stores.”

“Differentiation will be even more crucial, as there are signs that suggest the industry’s growth is slowing. Traffic to subscription service sites in January rose 18%, according to Hitwise. Though that’s healthy growth, it’s well off the 56% gain registered a year earlier.”

 
Click the image to read more.


 

Looking for Marketing Salary Information?

1 Mar

We’ve talked before about salary information sites such as PayScale. Today, we’re highlighting another valuable salary guide — Good Calculators.

At  the salary calculator section of the site, you can learn salaries by state, occupation, and career, and all occupations by region.

Here are several marketing career salary examples from Good Calculators. [PLEASE NOTE: In reviewing these numbers, please keep in mind that they refer to specific careers. In each state, all of the careers illustrated below are available!]

  • Arizona, management occupations, food service managers — average annual salary = $55,010; average hourly salary = $26.45; no. of employees: 3,360
  • California, management occupations, marketing managers — average annual salary = $161,640; average hourly salary = $77.71; no. of employees: 32,800
  • Florida, management occupations, lodging managers — average annual salary = $64,980; average hourly salary = $31.24; no. of employees: 3,430
  • Illinois, management occupations, public relations and fundraising managers — average annual salary = $107,060; average hourly salary = $51.47; no. of employees: 3,210
  • Maryland, sales and related occupations, advertising sales agents — average annual salary = $61,760; average hourly salary = $29.69; no. of employees: 1,260
  • New York, management occupations, marketing managers — average annual salary = $186,940; average hourly salary = $89.88; no. of employees: 14,860
  • North Carolina, sales and related occupations, real-estate brokers — average annual salary = $60,010; average hourly salary = $28.85; no. of employees: 6,020
  • Ohio, management occupations, sales managers — average annual salary = $124,960; average hourly salary = $60.08; no. of employees: 12,140
  • Pennsylvania, management occupations, purchasing managers — average annual salary = $117,960; average hourly salary = $56.71; no. of employees: 1,820
  • South Carolina, sales and related occupations, securities/financial services brokers — average annual salary = $92,940; average hourly salary = $44.68; no. of employees: 1,410
  • Texas, sales and related occupations, first-line supervisors of non-retail sales workers — average annual salary = $84,730; average hourly salary = $40.74; no. of employees: 25,630

 
To learn A LOT MORE about salary possibilities by state, occupation, and career, click the image.


 

How Big a Hurdle Is Ad Blocking in 2017?

17 Feb

Ad blocking is becoming an enormous problem for online marketers, going from a nuisance a couple of years ago to a major threat today. ARE YOU PREPARED TO HANDLE IT?

Technopedia describes ad blockers as follows:

“An ad blocker is a program that will remove different kinds of advertising from a Web user’s experience online. These programs target certain kinds of ads, such as pop-ups, banner ads ,and other common forms of online ad blockers work in many different ways. Some are standalone programs, while others are features of more comprehensive customizing services, or add-ons for a particular browser or operating system. Some browser-specific programs, like PithHelmet for Safari, or other programs for browsers, like Opera, are designed to work well in a particular environment. Others work with Windows or another operating system to block pop-ups or other kinds of ads.”

“Users have a wide range of options for blocking out different kinds of ads. Some programs delete cookies and other Web markers to effectively limit ads. Web proxy programs like Privoxy can be effective ad blockers. Some users will choose to block Adobe Flash in order to block annoying video ads, which are now common on some websites. There are also freeware programs that may use simple principles to block out advertising.”

So, how much of a threat is ad blocking in 2017? Even though eMarketer has scaled back its estimates slightly; ad blocking is still growing significantly. As eMarketer notes:

“eMarketer has scaled back its estimates of ad blocking users in the U.S., reducing the number to 75.1 million. At that level, more than one-quarter (27.5%) of US internet users will use ad blockers this year. While the estimate has been reduced, growth is still significant, at 16.2% in 2017.”

“Ad blocking is much more common among desktop/laptop users than smartphone users. For smartphones, the incidence of ad blocking is less than 8%. That’s partly because mobile ad blockers are often not as effective — especially within apps — as they are on desktops and laptops. Ad blocking continues to be far more prevalent among younger people. This year, 41.1% of millennials will use ad blockers, r estimates. The use is lower among Gen X internet users at 26.9%, and for baby boomers, ad blocking is at 13.9%.”

 
Click the image to read more.

US Ad Blocking User Penetration, Desktop/Laptop vs. Smartphone, 2014-2018 (% of population)

 

Connected Vehicles Generate BIG Data

14 Feb

This post is a follow-up to yesterday’s.

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As we know, the auto industry is in the midst of a major technological revolution. Although self-driving vehicles have garnered a huge amount of attention, “connected” vehicles will also have an enormous impact on marketing. Why? From the consumer’s point of view, connectivity means better Bluetooth interactivity, GPS systems, entertainment systems, roadside assistance, diagnostics, and more. From the seller’s point of view, connectivity means access to lots of big data.

Consider these observations from Felix Richter, writing for Statista:

“Modern cars are equipped with more than 100 sensors that create a constant stream of data. Measuring things like location, performance, physical parameters, and driving behavior, often several times per second, the amount of data generated by these sensors is immense. According to a McKinsey estimate, connected cars create up to 25 gigabytes of data per hour. That’s the equivalent of nearly 30 hours of HD video playback and more than a month’s worth of 24-hour music streaming.”

“According to the analysts in charge of our Digital Market Outlook, the data created by connected cars have a lot of potential in terms of monetization. Think insurance companies for example, who would likely be willing to pay good money to find out more about our driving habits. For more information about this exciting new market, please download our free market report Connected Car: Vehicle Services.”

 
Take a look at this chart to see how big the data collected from connected vehicles really are.


 

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