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Which Are the Leading B2B Firms?

23 Mar

A lot of public attention is paid to business-to-consumer (B2C) companies, far more than to business-to-business (B2B) firms — even though B2B firms generate trillions of dollars of revenue per year. Interestingly, some of the leaders in B2B are also leaders in B2B!

To partly close the public visibility gap, Sacunas annually publishes a list of the top 100 business-to-business companies:

“We believe the best brands don’t just command the most market share; they’re the companies that also make experience a part of their success. We took a holistic approach to identifying the Top 100 Global B2B Brands of 2016 to find those that focused on more than revenue. We measured multiple brand data points across their people, products, digital footprints, market command, and innovation. Our companies to watch are digitally-savvy market leaders who will be defining their industry landscapes for 2017. They are forward thinkers who know how to push the right boundaries, treat employees, and simply have some serious B2B swag.”

“In today’s economy, price point no longer defines market share; experiences are the strategic differentiator for brands. Consumers, especially millennials, are willing to pay a premium for optimally designed experiences. The companies that rose to our top ten B2B brands are experience connoisseurs – they know how to design for their customers and end consumers. These companies not only do their research and make great products, but they also design seamless experiences and invest significantly in innovation – driving the design economy towards the next big thing.”

The top 5 organizations in the new B2B list are [click the company names to see why]:

  1. Google/Alphabet
  2. General Electric
  3. Intel
  4. AECOM
  5. Apple

Note: About 15 of the top 100 B2B firms also have a significant in B2C markets.
 
Click the image to see the full list of 100 organizations.

 

Informative IoT Video

15 Mar

As we reported before, according to TechTarget: “The Internet of Things (IoT) is a system of interrelated computing devices, mechanical and digital machines, objects, animals, or people that are provided with unique identifiers and the ability to transfer data over a network without requiring human-to-human or human-to-computer interaction.”

Now, there is a new video on IoT by Banyan Hills Technologies:

“There’s a lot of hype and discussion about IoT these days. This video explains IoT, and what it means for the enterprise. IoT is very real, and the next great technology era of our time. In this video, you’ll learn about the similarities between IoT and E-commerce and what it means to retailers and businesses looking to implement IoT to innovate, improve operational efficiency, automate, and drive new revenue.”

 

 

Is the Stock Market Over-Exuberant for Snap?

3 Mar

Snap Inc. is a U.S.-based technology and social media company that was started in 2011 .Products include the popular Snapchat app and Spectacles eye wear; it also owns the Bitmoji app.

Yesterday (March 2, 2017) was a big day for Snap Inc. and the tech industry overall because of Snap’s highly anticipated IPO (initial public offering) on the New York Stock Exchange. Some analysts are excited at the popularity of this IPO; others wonder whether investors are being overly exuberant. What do YOU think?

As reported by CNBC:

“Snap soared as much as 45% when it opened for trading at $24 a share on Thursday. Market makers at the New York Stock Exchange indicated the stock was set to open from $23.50 to $24.50 a share. At 200 million shares, Snap raised $3.4 billion and was valued at nearly $24 billion as of its pricing. Sources had told CNBC earlier this week that investors were expecting a pricing of $17 to $18 per share, above the $14 to $16 per share range originally given by the company. The IPO is 12 times oversubscribed, sources said Thursday morning, meaning that there were 12 times more orders for than there were shares offered. Some managers told CNBC they got as little as 2 percent of what they were asking for.”

 

Yet, Felix Richter commented thusly for Statista:

“Snap’s IPO valuation of $24 billion is quite a tall order for a company that has never turned a profit and warned investors that it never might. The company is now valued at 59 times its total revenue for 2016. Even for a fast-growing tech company that is a lot. Facebook in comparison has a price-to-sales ratio of around 14. As our chart illustrates, Snap is valued considerably higher than many American household names. That includes companies such as Ralph Lauren and Harley-Davidson that have been around for decades and probably will be for decades to come.”

Infographic: Snap Is More Valuable Than These Household Names | Statista You will find more statistics at Statista

 

How to Be a Better Public Speaker

28 Feb

For many people, public speaking can be tension-provoking, nerve racking, and more — especially for those who do not have much public speaking experience or who are presenting to large audiences.

So, take a deep breath, prepare well, be self-confident, and read these tips from Kevin Getch, writing for BusinessCollective (as presented by Tech.Co):

Be Humble — “Even if you present on a regular basis, don’t get over-confident. Even the pros slip once in awhile. Every moment you have on stage is a gift of people’s time and attention, so you should never turn it away by preparing inadequately.”

Have All Materials Ready Beforehand — “If you’re not able to commit your speech to memory, have a clear outline printed and easily accessible. Your cell phone is not a good substitute. I learned this when I forgot my lines and fumbled with my phone, trying to scroll to the right spot, but the pressure of 500+ eyes got the best of me. What came out of my mouth was a jumble of words. Now, I have hard copies of everything I may need. Print your material in a larger font with extra spacing to make the text easier to see and read. If you’re reading, make sure to look up at the audience often. It keeps people engaged.

Understand the Format of the Presentation — [From Evans on Marketing: Are you presenting on a stage or on the same level as the audience? Will you use a microphone? How much time do you have? Will there be a Q&A after the presentation? Are you presenting alone or with others? Are audience members experts or novices on your topic? Are PowerPoints and/or handouts expected? Etc.?]

Remember, Everybody Has Had Embarrassing Moments — “Rand Fishkin, a founder of Moz told me a story of his own. The greatest and most successful leaders in history have all experienced embarrassment and failure. In life and business, there will be times when you fail and times when you’re embarrassed. It’s going to happen. If there’s anything I’ve learned, it’s that you have to be comfortable with being uncomfortable in order to succeed.”

Practice Embarrassing Yourself — “While there may be consequences for poor judgment, taking chances often leads to a greater reward. As a leader, if you can’t accept your mistakes, you hold back your personal growth, your team’s growth and your company’s. It’s better to create an environment where people are encouraged to try new things and get out of their comfort zone, especially in low-pressure situations.

 
Click the image below to read more.
 

 

Are You Thinking of Using a Job Recruiter?

27 Feb

Job recruiters of all types can be very helpful to potential job applicants who are looking to move to the next level of their careers. BUT! Several factors should be kept in mind if you (as a job applicant) want to work with a recruiter.

“Whether they call themselves executive recruiters, headhunters, or executive search consultants, they’re the people who help companies fill open positions by finding the best candidate for the job. That means plenty of time spent prospecting for companies, searching for candidates, and staying glued to LinkedIn. We spoke to a few executive recruiters to learn their secrets—from how much they get paid to why they sometimes have a reputation for being less than polite.”

 

  1. “They work for the company, not the job seeker.”
  2. “They can earn big bucks for placing one candidate.”
  3. “They spend a lot of time with Excel. Recruiters will make and update lists of potential companies, job openings, and candidates Even if a company passes on one of their candidates, recruiters keep the names and contact information of good candidates in their spreadsheets for future opportunities.”
  4. “The word they hear most often is ‘no.’ On the candidate side, you are selling yourself as someone worthwhile to speak to—to open up and share intimate information about career dreams, compensation, and personal/family goals.”
  5. “They’re addicted to LinkedIn. Executive recruiters lurk in LinkedIn every day.”
  6. “Dealing with dejected or dishonest job seekers drains their energy.”
  7. “The burnout rate is high.”
  8. [Some] companies use them as a last resort.
  9. They’re spin doctors. Most recruiters are honest, respectful, and professional. But some  may be brusque when making cold calls or dealing with a candidate who isn’t a good match for an open job.”
  10. “They’re less competitive (with each other) than you might think.”
  11. “They accept the reality that the best candidate doesn’t always get the job. A mediocre candidate may beat out an outstanding candidate.”
  12. They love solving problems for their clients, working with people, and matching a job seeker to a company.”

 

Click the image to read a lot more!

Photo by iStock.

Photo by iStock.

 

Connected Vehicles Generate BIG Data

14 Feb

This post is a follow-up to yesterday’s.

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As we know, the auto industry is in the midst of a major technological revolution. Although self-driving vehicles have garnered a huge amount of attention, “connected” vehicles will also have an enormous impact on marketing. Why? From the consumer’s point of view, connectivity means better Bluetooth interactivity, GPS systems, entertainment systems, roadside assistance, diagnostics, and more. From the seller’s point of view, connectivity means access to lots of big data.

Consider these observations from Felix Richter, writing for Statista:

“Modern cars are equipped with more than 100 sensors that create a constant stream of data. Measuring things like location, performance, physical parameters, and driving behavior, often several times per second, the amount of data generated by these sensors is immense. According to a McKinsey estimate, connected cars create up to 25 gigabytes of data per hour. That’s the equivalent of nearly 30 hours of HD video playback and more than a month’s worth of 24-hour music streaming.”

“According to the analysts in charge of our Digital Market Outlook, the data created by connected cars have a lot of potential in terms of monetization. Think insurance companies for example, who would likely be willing to pay good money to find out more about our driving habits. For more information about this exciting new market, please download our free market report Connected Car: Vehicle Services.”

 
Take a look at this chart to see how big the data collected from connected vehicles really are.


 

The State of Big Data in 2017

13 Feb

As we have noted several times over the years (see for example: 1, 2, 3), big data are an important element of the marketer’s toolbox. So, what is the state of big data in 2017?

Recently, eMarketer published its Big Data Roundup for 2017:

“Most key objectives of marketers are rooted in big data, from targeting and customer relationship management to attribution — and even artificial intelligence. eMarketer has curated this Roundup of articles, insights, and interviews to help you understand why and how advertisers and marketers are putting these large, complex data sets to work.”

 

“Big data are gradually becoming a part of U.S. business, and companies that are able to take advantage of their scope and complexity appear to be seeing benefits. In January 2017, research from NewVantage Partners  revealed that at least half of organizations are incorporating some type of big data initiative. Not all areas businesspeople were polled on got high marks. Of the big data initiatives executives were asked about, establishing a data-driven culture and making over their business for the future had the lowest success rates, both at 27.9%.”

 

Click the image to view the Roundup report.

 

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