Will Companies Be Ready for Europe’s General Data Protection Rule?

22 Jun

In the United States, consumer privacy rules are not as strong as they are in other areas of the world. Recently, the U.S. Congress voted to overturn a pending regulation that would require Internet service providers (ISPs) to obtain people’s permission before selling their data about them. President Trump then signed the rollback.

As reported by NPR.org:

“The reversal is a victory for ISPs, which have argued that the regulation would put them at a disadvantage compared with so-called edge providers, like Google and Facebook. Those firms are regulated by the Federal Trade Commission and face less stringent requirements. ISPs collect huge amounts of data on the Web sites people visit, including medical, financial, and other personal information. The FCC regulation would have required ISPs to ask permission before selling that information to advertisers and others, a so-called opt-in provision.”

In contrast to the U.S. approach to privacy, Europe has a sweeping new regulation that will take effect in May 2018. It will have an impact on companies based anywhere, including the United States.

Brian Wallace, reporting for CMS Wire, describes the General Data Protection Rule (GDPR), thusly. Be sure to read the material highlighted:

“The European Parliament passed the General Data Protection Rule (GDPR) in April 2016. The law is one of the most sweeping privacy laws protecting citizens ever to be put on the books, and is scheduled to take effect on May 25, 2018. One of the most misunderstood things about this law is that it covers EU citizen data, no matter which country the company using it is located. This means that any company in the world that stores EU citizen protected data has less than a year to come into compliance with the GDPR.

According to the GDPR’s Web site, “The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) replaces the Data Protection Directive 95/46/EC and was designed to harmonize data privacy laws across Europe, to protect and empower all EU citizens data privacy, and to reshape the way organizations across the region approach data privacy. The GDPR protects personal data and sensitive personal data. This includes: sensitive data: name, location, identification numbers, IP address, cookies, RFID info; and sensitive personal data: health data, genetic data, biometric data, racial or ethnic data, political opinions, and sexual orientation.

 

Take a look at the following infographic from Digital Guardian to learn more! Click the image for a larger version.


 

Social Media Demographics by Platform

21 Jun

For companies to best use different social media platforms in their marketing strategies, it is imperative that they understand how viewers differ across these platforms — especially in terms of viewer demographics. For example, the typical Facebook social media user does not have the same demographic profile as the typical Pinterest social media user.

As Alex York reports for Sprout Social:

“The best marketers you’ll come across don’t sleep until they have a better idea about their audience and segmentation strategy. It pays to have your message reach the right people at the right time. In the social media industry, your audience demographics can change in what seems like overnight. The challenge of reaching new audiences has never been harder, but grasping up-to-date data on social media demographics helps. Each business has their own unique audience identity, but that segmentation might not pan across each social media network successfully. Instead, it takes better brand alignment, thought-out social conversations and meaningful connections with your core group of brand loyalists.”

 
Take a look at Sprout Social’s in-depth infographic on viewer demographics by platform — including Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Pinterest.
 

 

How to Utilize Intelligent Engagement

20 Jun

Despite the many recent advances in enhanced customer service technology, many companies are always looking for better ways to engage their customers and gain more customer loyalty. The latest technology is known as intelligent engagement.

Bold360 is an example of an intelligent engagement service provider. It:

“puts your customer insights to work in real-time, across every channel, at the point of engagement. We named it Bold360 because it gives your business a 360-degree view of your customer and guides your agents to the next best action for that customer, in that moment.”

The Right Insights at the Right Time — With intelligence gained from previous interactions and data from disparate systems, agents are empowered with real-time customer insights for more contextually relevant interactions. Intelligent Automation that Delights — Not every customer engagement is created equal. Bold360 uses customer profile information to automate routine interactions without sacrificing quality and to automate portions of the agent workflow to deliver the next best action. Channels that Work Together as One — Bold360 provides the digital channels preferred by today’s mobile-first consumers and makes it possible to seamlessly move across self-service and live channels with full context intact.”

 
Take a look at the video below to learn more.


 

Should Salaries Be Transparent?

19 Jun

This is certainly an explosive topic, with great differences of opinion. For example: Yes — This is part of a more open communication style. No — This invades privacy and can cause dissension among employees. What do YOU think?

Recently, Creative Group (a staffing firm) conducted research on this topic:

“Should professionals’ pay be public knowledge? Employers in the advertising and marketing fields don’t think so, according to new research from staffing firm Creative Group. More than eight in 10 creative executives interviewed (82 percent) said their organization refrains from publicizing employees’ compensation. Of those respondents, 61 percent feel pay transparency would decrease staff morale.”

“Is there an upside to embracing an open salary policy? According to the survey, the top benefits of sharing compensation information openly are increasing productivity (18 percent) and boosting recruitment and retention (17 percent). However, more than one-quarter of executives (27 percent) believe the potential risks outweigh any rewards.”

 

Take a look at the following infographic that summarizes that research findings.


 

2017 Marketing Hall of Fame Inductee: Jerry Wind

16 Jun

As we noted in our June 14 post, each year, the American Marketing Association New York inducts outstanding marketers into the Marketing Hall of Fame for their significant lifetime achievements: “The Marketing Hall of Fame is the only award which recognizes individual marketers (not companies or campaigns) who have made outstanding contributions to the field of marketing. Individuals are eligible be they corporate CMOs or VPs of Marketing; agency marketers — advertising, branding, research etc.; or academics, journalists, and other marketing experts. Nominees must have been in the marketing profession for at least 10 years and be a current marketing practitioner.”

 

Today’s video is from Jerry Wind’s Hall of Fame induction speech. There are several career and marketing observations in this presentation.

 

2017 Marketing Hall of Fame Inductee: Jon Iwata

15 Jun

As we noted in our June 14 post, each year, the American Marketing Association New York inducts outstanding marketers into the Marketing Hall of Fame for their significant lifetime achievements: “The Marketing Hall of Fame is the only award which recognizes individual marketers (not companies or campaigns) who have made outstanding contributions to the field of marketing. Individuals are eligible be they corporate CMOs or VPs of Marketing; agency marketers — advertising, branding, research etc.; or academics, journalists, and other marketing experts. Nominees must have been in the marketing profession for at least 10 years and be a current marketing practitioner.”

 

Today’s video is from Jon Iwata’s Hall of Fame induction speech. There are several career and marketing observations in this presentation.

 

2017 Marketing Hall of Fame Inductee: Gary Briggs

14 Jun

Each year, the American Marketing Association New York inducts outstanding marketers into the Marketing Hall of Fame for their significant lifetime achievements:

“The Marketing Hall of Fame is the only award which recognizes individual marketers (not companies or campaigns) who have made outstanding contributions to the field of marketing. Individuals are eligible be they corporate CMOs or VPs of Marketing; agency marketers — advertising, branding, research etc.; or  academics, journalists, and other marketing experts. Nominees must have been in the marketing profession for at least 10 years and be a current marketing practitioner. Our primary focus is on, but not limited to, the U.S. The Marketing Hall of Fame Judging Panel is an exclusive group of CEO’s and thought leaders. Judges review and vote on the short list of finalists. We’re pleased to have this distinguished panel of experts involved in the inductee voting process.

“This year’s inductees are Gary Briggs, Vice-President, Chief Marketing Officer, Facebook; Jon Iwata, Senior Vice-President, Marketing and Communications, IBM; Jim Stengel, former Global Marketing Officer, Procter & Gamble and President/CEO, The Jim Stengel Company, and Jerry Wind, Ph.D., Professor of Marketing, The Wharton School.”

 

Today’s video is from Gary Briggs’ Hall of Fame induction speech. There are several career and marketing observations in this presentation.

 

 

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