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How Dominant Is Amazon Online?

24 Apr

It’s no surprise to any of us that Amazon is by far the leading online U.S. retailer. But would you be surprised to learn that Apple’s most recent annual online revenues exceeded those of Walmart? Or to learn that Amazon’s online revenues for its most recent year were greater than the next 14 U.S. retailers COMBINED (according to eMarketer)?

In the following chart compiled by us from eMarketer, E-commerce and store revenues are shown for the 15 leading online U.S. retailers. Highlighted in the chart are E-commerce revenues, growth in E-commerce revenues, E-commerce revenues as a % of company revenues, store sales and store sales growth, and overall revenues and revenue growth for the firms’ most recent reported year.  [Note: The table shows that Amazon had more than $40 billion in B2B revenues].

Among store-based retailers in the chart, E-revenues as a % of company revenues are highest for Williams-Sonoma, Nordstrom, Macy’s, and Gap. They are lowest for Walmart, Costco, Target, and Home Depot. And while E-commerce sales grew for most firms in the chart, store revenues  declined for more retailers.

Click here to see the same types of data from eMarketer on many more retailers. Click the chart for a larger version of it.

 


 

FREE: 2017 Edition of Careers in Business

11 Apr

Learn about the many opportunities and challenges facing those interested in a career in business. The latest data are included. Lots of data!!
 

Outline of Topics:
  • General Hints
  • Background Data By Occupation
  • Long-term Trends
  • Hot Long-term Business Career Opportunities
  • Bureau Of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook
  • LinkedIn
  • “Find A Job” Resources

 

 

Best Locales for Millennials

7 Apr

As we know, millennials have surpassed baby boomers as the largest demographic age group in the United States. Yet, many people in this massive and influential group are having a complicated time with their careers and lifestyles.

According to Richie Bernardo, writing for WalletHub:

“Loved by marketers, vilified by media, millennials are at once the most popular and unpopular generation alive. They’re the largest, too, giving them an outsized influence on American culture and consumerism. Today, these late-teens-to-early-30-somethings who are often depicted through negative stereotypes — entitled, parentally dependent, deludedly invincible — are responsible for 21 percent of all consumer discretionary spending in the U.S.”

“Despite their trillion-dollar purchasing power and higher educational attainment, millennials are economically worse off than their parents. Why? The financial crisis remains a big part of the reason. Millennials have come of age and entered the workforce in the shadow of the Great Recession, significantly reducing their job prospects and earning potential for decades to come. By one estimate, millennials today earn 20 percent less than Baby Boomers did at the same age.”

Where are the best and worst places for millennials to live? “WalletHub’s data team compared the 50 states and the District of Columbia to determine where this generational cluster has thrived and withered. We examined each state and the District across 24 key metrics, ranging from share of millennials to millennial unemployment rate to millennial voter-turnout rate.”

Here are two informative charts from WalletHub.

 

Best Overall Locales for Millennials

 

Best and Worst Locales by Attribute for Millennials

 

What Customers Want from a Program Loyalty

3 Apr

The quest for customer loyalty continues to be both a critical goal and a major challenge for companies of all types and sizes. [See 1, 2, 3.]

Today, we highlight an infographic from Colourfast (an international paper and plastic card printer based in Ontario, Canada) that looks at “what customers want to know before joining your loyalty program.”

Why is this perspective of customer loyalty programs to companies? According to Colourfast, American households have memberships in 29 loyalty programs but are active in just 12 of them; and a large percentage of shoppers do not even sign up for loyalty programs because of the hassle involved.

 


 

What’s the Most Expensive City in Which to Live?

29 Mar

Believe it or not, worldwide there are many cities that are more expensive than New York City and San Francisco — or any other U.S. city — in which to live. The most expensive U.S. city (New York) only ranks as the ninth most expensive.

The Economist Intelligence Unit recently published “Worldwide Cost of Living 2017: A ranking of the world’s major cities”:

“Singapore retains its title as the world’s most expensive city for a fourth consecutive year in a top ten that may have a familiar feel to it. Not only has Singapore stayed top but Hong Kong remains second, closely followed by Zurich. The latest survey has also seen a return to the top ten most expensive cities for Tokyo and Osaka. The Japanese capital, which was the world’s most expensive city until 2012, has moved seven places up the ranking owing to a sustained recovery in the strength of the Japanese yen.With Japanese cities returning to the fold, Asia now accounts for half of the ten most expensive cities ranked. Western Europe accounts for a further four cities, while New York City is the lone North American representative. The Big Apple, which rose to seventh place last year, has fallen to ninth owing to a slight weakening of the U.S. dollar, which has also affected the position of other US cities. For New York, this still represents a comparatively sharp increase in the relative cost of living compared with five years ago, when New York was ranked 46th.”

 
Here are the 10 most expensive cities in the world as charted by Statisa.
 

 

Glassdoor’s Best Employers for 2017: Multiple Rankings

27 Mar

Each year, career services firm Glassdoor publishes various lists of “best places to work,” based on feedback from those job seekers and employees providing feedback to Glassdoor. By clicking on the image shown below, you can access Glassdoor’s 2017 “best” recommendations.

 

 

What makes Glassdoor’s lists especially valuable are the number of different perspectives that are available:

 

Skills That Entrepreneurs Need

14 Mar

Being an entrepreneur is not easy. It requires creativity, patience, a willingness to take risks, expertise, endurance, and a whole lot more.

According to Growth Hackers’ co-founder and CEO Jonathan Aufray:

“An entrepreneur must be audacious, calculating, enthusiastic, and passionate. Creativity and managerial capabilities are also important to the success of an entrepreneur. An entrepreneur needs to be a talented multi-disciplinary individual, a bit like the growth hacker job description, which is very complex, the entrepreneur job description is even more complicated.”

“Contrary to popular opinion, entrepreneurial skills and qualities can be learned, practiced, and developed. You must, however, make a conscious decision to nurture these qualities and skills. Once you begin to make a conscious effort to acquire these skills, particularly skills in the area where you are deficient, you would have repositioned yourself for tremendous accomplishments as an entrepreneur in the business world.”

Aufray has identified 29 skills as important for successful entrepreneurship. Here are ten of them:

  1. Personal capabilities
  2. Image building
  3. Effective communication
  4. Ability to negotiate
  5. Ability to lead
  6. Ability to sell
  7. Ability to concentrate (focus)
  8. Customer relations
  9. Preparedness to learn
  10. Inquisitiveness

 
Click the image for a full discussion of the above 10 skills and to see Aufray’s whole list of 29 entrepreneurial skills.
 

 

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