Tag Archives: competition

Can Mark Wahlberg Help AT&T?

26 Apr

The competition among TV service, Internet, and cellphone service providers is more intense than ever — especially with the discount cellphone service pricing from T-Mobile and Sprint. Both AT&T and Verizon have seen this competition hit their bottom lines.

As a result, AT&T has just signed up celebrity Mark Wahlberg to headline video commercials that encompass all of the services that AT&T offers. Will this “all in one” campaign succeed?
 
 
Here is is a 90-second ad that AT&T uploaded to YouTube on April 24, 2017.


 
No matter how well the campaign does, Mark Wahlberg will do VERY well!!! 🙂


 

Amazing But True: Netflix More Popular Than DVR

17 Mar

For years, cable and satellite TV service providers have used the DVR as a major competitive advantage. But, today, streaming services are changing the playing field. To the dismay of TV service providers, channels, and their advertisers, a huge number of customers are cutting the TV cord and turning to Amazon, Netflix, and other streaming subscriptions for their content — aided by smart TV sets as well as plug-in devices that can allow people to stream video content on their sets.

It may be hard to believe, given the dominance of the DVR just a few years ago, but today, slightly more U.S. households (and growing) have access to Netflix than to a DVR — according to Leichtman Research Group. The Leichtman study findings are summarized in the following Statista chart.
 

 

McDonald’s Honest Self-Assessment – in Public!

7 Mar

McDonald’s is revamping its global strategy in hopes of stimulating sales and profits. Some of its planned changes are substantial. And, it has offered an honest self-assessment in a very public way. [Many firms do not even acknowledge their weaknesses outside of the company itself.]

Just a few days ago, the fast-food giant issued a major press release, “McDonald’s Unveils New Global Growth Plan.” Here are some highlights:

“The growth plan focuses on enhancing digital capabilities and the use of technology to dramatically elevate the customer experience; redefining customer convenience through delivery; accelerating deployment of ‘Experience of the Future’ restaurants in the U.S.; initiating a new 3-year target for cash return to shareholders; and establishing new financial targets for sales, operating margin, earnings per share, and return on incremental invested capital.”

“The strategy connects key tenets of the brand to well-defined customer groups built around three pillars: (1) Retaining existing customers by fortifying and extending our areas of strength. Through a renewed focus on areas such as family occasions and food-led breakfast and transforming the experience in our restaurants, McDonald’s will build on the strong foothold it has and grow the core of the business. (2) Regaining customers lost to other QSR [quick-service restaurants] competitors. As customers’ expectations increased, McDonald’s simply didn’t keep pace with them. Making meaningful improvements in quality, convenience, and value will win back some of McDonald’s best customers. (3) “Converting casual customers to committed customers by being more present in underdeveloped categories and occasions and competing more aggressively given the untapped demand for McCafé coffee and other snack offerings.”

“We have fundamentally changed the trajectory of our business over the past two years. Now, we are ready to build on our momentum and transition to focus efforts on profitable, long-term growth. We are building a better McDonald’s, one that makes delicious feel good moments easy for everyone, and the moves we are making will reassert McDonald’s as the global leader in the informal eating out category.”

“To bring customers into the restaurants, McDonald’s must matter to people and be relevant in their daily lives. To do so, McDonald’s is accelerating digital capabilities and enhancing its use of technology in restaurants, in the drive-thru, and on the go. The result is a more stress-free, personalized experience, enhanced by technology and world-class hospitality that puts customers in control.”

“One of the most significant disruptions in the restaurant business today is the rapid increase in delivery . Because of our extraordinary footprint, McDonald’s is uniquely positioned to become the global leader in delivery. In McDonald’s top five markets (U.S., France, the U.K., Germany, and Canada), nearly 75% of the population lives within three miles of a McDonald’s. Currently, McDonald’s is experimenting with different delivery models including partnering with third parties for ordering and fulfillment throughout the world.”

“Experience of the Future restaurants elevate the customer experience at McDonald’s to provide a more convenient, more personalized, and more enjoyable visit. It leverages the convenience and technology of kiosk ordering and table service, increasing functionality of the mobile app to enhance the enjoyment of our food and the hospitality of the McDonald’s crew, all in a more modern, more exciting restaurant environment.”

 
Click the image to read A LOT MORE!

 

Are You Thinking of Using a Job Recruiter?

27 Feb

Job recruiters of all types can be very helpful to potential job applicants who are looking to move to the next level of their careers. BUT! Several factors should be kept in mind if you (as a job applicant) want to work with a recruiter.

“Whether they call themselves executive recruiters, headhunters, or executive search consultants, they’re the people who help companies fill open positions by finding the best candidate for the job. That means plenty of time spent prospecting for companies, searching for candidates, and staying glued to LinkedIn. We spoke to a few executive recruiters to learn their secrets—from how much they get paid to why they sometimes have a reputation for being less than polite.”

 

  1. “They work for the company, not the job seeker.”
  2. “They can earn big bucks for placing one candidate.”
  3. “They spend a lot of time with Excel. Recruiters will make and update lists of potential companies, job openings, and candidates Even if a company passes on one of their candidates, recruiters keep the names and contact information of good candidates in their spreadsheets for future opportunities.”
  4. “The word they hear most often is ‘no.’ On the candidate side, you are selling yourself as someone worthwhile to speak to—to open up and share intimate information about career dreams, compensation, and personal/family goals.”
  5. “They’re addicted to LinkedIn. Executive recruiters lurk in LinkedIn every day.”
  6. “Dealing with dejected or dishonest job seekers drains their energy.”
  7. “The burnout rate is high.”
  8. [Some] companies use them as a last resort.
  9. They’re spin doctors. Most recruiters are honest, respectful, and professional. But some  may be brusque when making cold calls or dealing with a candidate who isn’t a good match for an open job.”
  10. “They’re less competitive (with each other) than you might think.”
  11. “They accept the reality that the best candidate doesn’t always get the job. A mediocre candidate may beat out an outstanding candidate.”
  12. They love solving problems for their clients, working with people, and matching a job seeker to a company.”

 

Click the image to read a lot more!

Photo by iStock.

Photo by iStock.

 

Do You Have a Really Good Concept for a Startup Business?

23 Feb

Thinking of starting a new business? Can you properly and uniquely address the nine topics that are shown in the infographic below by StartBloggingOnline?

 

9 Ways to Validate Your Startup Ideas
 

How the Global Population Is Evolving

10 Feb
For many marketers, understanding the shifts in the global population is imperative. Take a look at this video to learn more.

 


 

2017 Global Economic Prospects from the World Bank

3 Feb

Each year, the World Bank publishes its global economic outlook — and makes it available for free!

For 2017, the World Bank expects the following:

“[In 2016,] stagnant global trade, subdued investment, and heightened policy uncertainty marked another difficult year for the world economy. A moderate recovery is expected for 2017, with receding obstacles to activity in commodity-exporting emerging market and developing economies. Weak investment is weighing on medium-term prospects across many emerging market and developing economies. Although fiscal stimulus in major economies, if implemented, may boost global growth above expectations, risks to growth forecasts remain tilted to the downside. Important downside risks stem from heightened policy uncertainty in major economies.”

 

Click the image to access the full 276-page report in PDF format.

 

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