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The Evolving Generational Work Place

16 Aug

Given the fact that (on average) people are living longer — and that the recent recession affected millions of workers’ retirement savings, many people are working longer. As a result, employers and employees must deal with a more multi-generational work force.

Recently, MetLife ran a paid post online with the NY Times on the topic of the multi-generational work place:

“It’s a new workplace. Technological advancements, generational shifts, and fundamental changes in the way we do business are a few forces behind a new work environment. For the first time in history, four distinct generations work side by side, making employees and their expectations of employers more diverse. A paycheck is no longer enough: Workers want more meaningful relationships with the organizations that employ them.”

“In this short video series, T Brand Studio and MetLife worked with industry experts to provide insight into the deeper motivations that drive employee engagement and happiness. With the right guidance and tools, any organization can keep its employees happy and engaged, resulting in a productive workplace and a healthy work force.”

 

 

A Social Media Policy for Employees

27 Jul

Globally, a very important issue facing companies of all types and sizes involves the use of social media by employees. Whether we are considering comments on company social media or observations at personal social media pages, there is a lot to be concerned about. In particular: (1) Is the desired company messaging presented consistently? (2) Do employees post anything that may reflect negatively upon their employers?

Recently, Larry Alton (writing for Social Media Examiner) presented these valuable recommendations:

“Want to help your employees better engage on social media? Wondering how a social media policy can help? A social media policy gives your employees guidelines for interacting with customers and protecting their personal safety, as well as your business’s reputation. In this article, you’ll discover three tips for creating a social media policy for your employees.”

(1) “Explain Who Can Speak for Your Company on Social Media. Your social media policy needs to explain who can or can’t speak on behalf of the company on social media. For example, Walmart has a strict social media policy that prohibits regular employees from answering customer complaints or questions directed toward the company. Walmart has an official social media team specifically for that purpose. However, not all policies have to be as strict as Walmart’s. In fact, a more relaxed policy can still protect your business and generate trust among your staff and fans. Experienced employees who are passionate about customer service may have solid advice to help customers resolve their concerns.

(2) “Create Detailed Guidelines for Business and Personal Conduct on Social Media. Your social media policy should provide detailed content guidelines for all of your employees who regularly (or occasionally) post on social media as your business. To help employees understand your expectations and create a consistent voice for the business, you can include standard responses to common situations in your policy [such as handling complaints, posting on personal accounts, etc.].”

(3) “Protect Your Employees and Sensitive Business Information. You can’t assume employees know what you consider ‘sensitive information.’ Also, many people share every aspect of their lives on social media. Your policy must clarify what business-related information employees shouldn’t share. You need to prohibit posts that put your business or staff at risk and explain why certain information creates a risk. If you run a coffee shop, for example, information on your opening procedures can be considered sensitive information since someone can use it when looking to steal from or hurt your employees.”

 
Click the image to read more from Alton.


 

Advice from U.S. Entrepreneurs: Starting, Growing, Staying Inspired

7 Jul

We can learn a lot from successful entrepreneurs in terms of how to start a business, how to scale a business, and how to stay inspired.

Recently, Tracey Wallace published (for Big Commerce) “234 American Business Owners on Starting, Scaling, and Staying Inspired:”

“This is about following your passion. This is about hope in the face of all odds. This is about hard work that builds a legacy of American business success. This is about building your own personal American Dream.”

 

Click the image to read more.


 

Should Salaries Be Transparent?

19 Jun

This is certainly an explosive topic, with great differences of opinion. For example: Yes — This is part of a more open communication style. No — This invades privacy and can cause dissension among employees. What do YOU think?

Recently, Creative Group (a staffing firm) conducted research on this topic:

“Should professionals’ pay be public knowledge? Employers in the advertising and marketing fields don’t think so, according to new research from staffing firm Creative Group. More than eight in 10 creative executives interviewed (82 percent) said their organization refrains from publicizing employees’ compensation. Of those respondents, 61 percent feel pay transparency would decrease staff morale.”

“Is there an upside to embracing an open salary policy? According to the survey, the top benefits of sharing compensation information openly are increasing productivity (18 percent) and boosting recruitment and retention (17 percent). However, more than one-quarter of executives (27 percent) believe the potential risks outweigh any rewards.”

 

Take a look at the following infographic that summarizes that research findings.


 

2017 Marketing Hall of Fame Inductee: Jerry Wind

16 Jun

As we noted in our June 14 post, each year, the American Marketing Association New York inducts outstanding marketers into the Marketing Hall of Fame for their significant lifetime achievements: “The Marketing Hall of Fame is the only award which recognizes individual marketers (not companies or campaigns) who have made outstanding contributions to the field of marketing. Individuals are eligible be they corporate CMOs or VPs of Marketing; agency marketers — advertising, branding, research etc.; or academics, journalists, and other marketing experts. Nominees must have been in the marketing profession for at least 10 years and be a current marketing practitioner.”

 

Today’s video is from Jerry Wind’s Hall of Fame induction speech. There are several career and marketing observations in this presentation.

 

2017 Marketing Hall of Fame Inductee: Jon Iwata

15 Jun

As we noted in our June 14 post, each year, the American Marketing Association New York inducts outstanding marketers into the Marketing Hall of Fame for their significant lifetime achievements: “The Marketing Hall of Fame is the only award which recognizes individual marketers (not companies or campaigns) who have made outstanding contributions to the field of marketing. Individuals are eligible be they corporate CMOs or VPs of Marketing; agency marketers — advertising, branding, research etc.; or academics, journalists, and other marketing experts. Nominees must have been in the marketing profession for at least 10 years and be a current marketing practitioner.”

 

Today’s video is from Jon Iwata’s Hall of Fame induction speech. There are several career and marketing observations in this presentation.

 

2017 Marketing Hall of Fame Inductee: Gary Briggs

14 Jun

Each year, the American Marketing Association New York inducts outstanding marketers into the Marketing Hall of Fame for their significant lifetime achievements:

“The Marketing Hall of Fame is the only award which recognizes individual marketers (not companies or campaigns) who have made outstanding contributions to the field of marketing. Individuals are eligible be they corporate CMOs or VPs of Marketing; agency marketers — advertising, branding, research etc.; or  academics, journalists, and other marketing experts. Nominees must have been in the marketing profession for at least 10 years and be a current marketing practitioner. Our primary focus is on, but not limited to, the U.S. The Marketing Hall of Fame Judging Panel is an exclusive group of CEO’s and thought leaders. Judges review and vote on the short list of finalists. We’re pleased to have this distinguished panel of experts involved in the inductee voting process.

“This year’s inductees are Gary Briggs, Vice-President, Chief Marketing Officer, Facebook; Jon Iwata, Senior Vice-President, Marketing and Communications, IBM; Jim Stengel, former Global Marketing Officer, Procter & Gamble and President/CEO, The Jim Stengel Company, and Jerry Wind, Ph.D., Professor of Marketing, The Wharton School.”

 

Today’s video is from Gary Briggs’ Hall of Fame induction speech. There are several career and marketing observations in this presentation.

 

 

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