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Secretly (?) Using LinkedIn for a Job Search

26 Oct

If you are currently employed and looking for confidentiality in a search for another job, you may have a tough task ahead of you — especially if you use LinkedIn during the search.

With this dilemma in mind, LinkedIn has recently introduced Open Candidates. As LinkedIn’s Dan Shapero writes:

“The secret to career happiness is finding a job you love, however there is no way to tell the world that you’re open to new opportunities without worrying about your employer finding out. But imagine if you could signal to recruiters everywhere that you’d like to hear from them, and by doing so increase your chances of having one of those magic moments when a recruiter reaches out with an amazing opportunity.”

Introducing Open Candidates. Open Candidates is a new feature that makes it easier to connect with your dream job by privately signaling to recruiters that you’re open to new job opportunities. You can specify the types of companies and roles you are most interested in and be easily found by the hundreds of thousands of recruiters who use LinkedIn to find great professional talent. Open Candidates is accessible from the “Preferences” tab on the LinkedIn Jobs home page.”

Here’s a short video overview.


So, is this new service as good as it seems? Maybe! Consider these observations from

“When you opt in to the new feature, called Open Candidate, recruiters are able to see that you are interested in potential opportunities. At the same time, LinkedIn will do its best to block your information from appearing to recruiters at your company or its subsidiaries. When you opt in, you can select a few specifics about what type of job you would like, what city you want to work in, and write a short message to potential recruiters.”

“Though LinkedIn does its best to hide your information from recruiters at or affiliated with your company, Dan Shapero notes that they can’t guarantee that it won’t be seen. Still, he says that early testing of the feature has been successful on all sides: so-called ‘open candidates’ are more likely to be contacted by recruiters and recruiters are more likely to hear back from them.”

The bottom line: The likelihood of your new job search being confidential on LinkedIn depends on how active your current employer is on LinkedIn — and social networkers do communicate with one another. Working with recruiters OFF-line will still be more confidential.

Personality Types and Career Choice

25 Oct

Our personalities affect every facet of our lives, including the jobs for which we are best suited. So, it is vital to understand your personality and how it will impact on your career success.

Let us turn to a large-scale study of 16 personality types by Truity Psychometrics titled “Does Your Personality Type Predict Your Career Destiny?”  [Click the preceding link to read in detail about the study.] Thousands of 12,000 people completed all or most of the research questionnaire for the online Truity study:

“Personality type assessments are one of the most commonly used tools in career planning. Extensive research, much of it based on the MBTI® assessment, has examined occupational trends among the 16 types, and studies have found clear differences in the occupations chosen by people of different personality types.”


“Our goal in this study was to objectively evaluate the assumptions that we make about the career paths of the 16 personality types. To this end, we aim to do a comprehensive analysis of various career outcomes among the 16 personality types and examine what differences, if any, exist between types.”


Here as an infographic look at the study results at


How to Be Better in Your Job Search

24 Oct

When searching for a job, are you effective? There are many excellent digital tools that can assist you in undertaking a better job search.

As Maria Onzain writes for

“Do you feel your job hunt efforts are inefficient? Do you want to jump-start your career but not sure how to do it? Using the right technology will help you build up a winning resume faster. Each of these digital tools will help you in the different phases of your job hunt.”

  • With Uptowork, “choose one of 20 templates in 400 colors and let this resume generator guide you. Once you have filled out all the sections, you will be able to edit and personalize it before getting a URL to share. From the dashboard, you can to track your resume’s performance and check how many times it has been seen and downloaded by recruiters.”
  • Use Grammarly to “make make sure your resume and cover letter are error-free. Copy and paste your resume in this platform, and you will instantly see if you have made any grammar mistakes.”
  • Through Jobscan, you can “check if your resume is tailored to the job description. Jobscan optimizes your resume keywords against the job description. All you need to do is paste your resume and the job description, and it will scan it for you.”
  • With GlassDoor, you can “get to know companies inside out. You can search for hundreds of companies all over the world and find precious information including, but not limited to, first-hand employees reviews, salary expectations, and details about the enterprise’s specific recruiting process.”
  • JobHero can “help you manage the whole job searching process. With the smart browser extension, you can save job opportunities from across the Web and you can access a personal dashboard to track the application process.”

Click the image to read more.


Walmart Finally Gets It: Employees Matter

19 Oct

For years, Walmart has had tough labor practices and been heavily criticized for them. For example, it has been sued by many women for unequal pay and promotion opportunities, fought hard against employees unionizing, paid low wages, etc. But, now Walmart is loosening up; and it realizes that happier employees can mean happier customers due to better customer service. It has even brought back store greeters in many locales where they had been eliminated to reduce costs. Yes, this comes at a time when U.S. revenues have been weak.

As Neil Irwin reports for the New York Times:

“A couple of years ago, Walmart, which once built its entire branding around a big yellow smiley face, was creating more than its share of frowns. Shoppers were fed up. They complained of dirty bathrooms, empty shelves, endless checkout lines, and impossible-to-find employees. Only 16 percent of stores were meeting the company’s customer service goals. The dissatisfaction showed up where it counts. Sales at stores open at least a year fell for five straight quarters; the company’s revenue fell for the first time in Walmart’s 45-year run as a public company in 2015 (currency fluctuations were a big factor, too).”

“To fix the situation, executives came up with what, for Walmart, counted as a revolutionary idea. As an efficient, multinational selling machine, the company had a reputation for treating employee pay as a cost to be minimized. In 2015, Walmart announced it would pay its workers more. Executives sketched out a plan to spend more money on increased wages and training, and offer more predictable scheduling. The results are promising. By early 2016, the proportion of stores hitting their targeted customer-service ratings had rebounded to 75 percent. Sales are rising again.”

“An employee making more than the market rate, after all, is likely to work harder and show greater loyalty. Workers who see opportunities to get promoted have an incentive not to mess up, compared with people who feel they are in a dead-end job. A person has more incentive to work hard, even when the boss isn’t watching, when the job pays better than what you could make down the street.”


Click the image to read a lot more from Irwin.


A Walmart trainee perfecting a cereal display in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Credit Melissa Lukenbaugh for The New York Times

A Walmart trainee perfecting a cereal display in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Credit Melissa Lukenbaugh for New York Times.


Enhance Your Career Credentials

14 Oct

I regularly ask my undergraduate and graduate students: Why should an employer want to hire YOU? What can YOU offer that is distinctive?

One good way to answer to these questions is by publishing material online through your own blog or at other Web sites. By doing this, you can show off your Web-related related skills, highlight your own expertise on a specific topic, and demonstrate how well you write.

Recently, Mark Miller presented some great observations on this subject for Business 2 Community.

“Writing is one of the most productive things you can do for your career. You don’t have to be seeking attention from creative recruitment agencies in order to benefit from it, either. On a personal level, you grow your personal brand and get an opportunity to show off your communication skills–something that’s valuable no matter your field. From a job perspective, it can help you draw attention to your employer’s company, drive traffic to its site, and have a positive impact on SEO.”

“The advantages to being a published author are many, but getting started isn’t easy. That’s something I found out the hard way working closely with content marketing recruitment. I’ve spent much of 2016 developing my authorship profile, developing relationships, and creating opportunities for myself and others in my business to share our ideas and insights. Now that I finally have some momentum going, I wanted to share some of the lessons I learned so you can avoid making the same mistakes and get a head start!”

Here are a few of Miller’s suggestions:

  • Know “what you bring to the table that’s unique enough to justify being read over dozens of similar articles and posts.”
  • “If you’re first starting out, begin with smaller publications even if they have much smaller readership. You can even self-publish on a personal blog or on a site that allows anyone to self-publish like LinkedIn.”
  • “Most blogs and Web sites that publish regularly and accept external contributions will have easy-to-find, publicly accessible editorial guidelines and directions to submit content.”
  • “Building up a portfolio of published articles and opinions takes time, and a lot of it. And submitting content, communicating with editors, and finally getting published will probably take longer than you think.”

Click the image to read a lot more tips from Miller. And look at the links below the image.



What One Factor Separates Good Leaders from Bad Ones?

6 Oct

The title of this post certainly raises an interesting question. What’s your choice of attributes? Why?

Here are excerpts from an interesting discussion on this topic by Andrea Thompson, a partner at McChrystal Group (an advisory services firm):

“What’s the one thing I should know to be a better leader? My answer remains the same: Know who you are, your strengths, and your weaknesses. Self-awareness will be that ‘extra something’ that boosts you up the corporate ladder. As we move up the ranks in our careers, our technical skills are usually the primary reason we get promoted. We closed the most deals or sold the most product. But as we develop as leaders, functional excellence is no longer the main component required to be high-performing and succeed as a senior leader. Self-awareness plays a much more prominent role.

“We’ve all worked for ‘that’ boss. He/she made a lot of money for the company—a real mover and shaker. And then they got promoted. Unfortunately, for those on the team, this new boss doesn’t have the necessary leadership skills to lead them. What went wrong? Why didn’t the successes of the past lead to success in the new environment? In my experience, it came down to self-awareness. Self-awareness is that critical skill that will help influence how you relate to others, how you communicate your guidance, and how you process input from others. Self-awareness underpins all that we do. It’s the difference between good and great.

“Those leaders who soon recognize that their own behaviors and emotions have a domino effect on their team—and adapt accordingly—build stronger teams. Self-awareness is that ‘multiplier’ that not only makes you a better leader, but those on your team better leaders, too.”


2016 Most Attractive Employers According to Students Globally

19 Sep

Last week, we posted about the “2016 Most Attractive Employers According to U.S. Students.” Today’s post focuses on Universum’s 2016 survey of college students around the world about the most attractive employers for those interested in business careers. The 2016 rankings are compiled from student surveys in the world’s 12 largest economies: Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Russia, UK, and USA:

“The World’s Most Attractive Employer companies, must rank in the top 90% of employers within at least six regional markets. If an employer is not listed or is ranked outside the top 90% in a market, it gets a default ranking which is equal to the position of the last company in the top 90% for that market. Results are weighted by GDP, so that a high ranking position in the U.S. has a greater influence than a high ranking position in India, for example.”


Here are the 2016 global top ten most attractive employers for business:

  1. Google
  2. Apple
  3. EY (Ernst & Young)
  4. Goldman Sachs
  5. PwC (PricewaterhouseCoopers)
  6. 6Deloitte
  7. Microsoft
  8. KPMG
  9. L’Oréal Group
  10. J.P. Morgan

Interested in more global insights? If yes, click here to download the PDF report.
Interested in a regional or country ranking? If yes, click here and scroll down the page for “Choose region” or “Go to country page.”


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