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Attributes That Employers Study for Their Marketing Hires

25 Apr

What attributes do employers most value when considering candidates for marketing positions? Certainly, there are many possible answers to this question depending on the company, the specific job, and other criteria.

Nonetheless, here is an interesting delineation of factors that employers consider, as suggested by Geoffrey James for Inc.:

“Hiring great marketers can be challenging, though. Some marketers are great at appearing to be useful when they’re really accomplishing next to nothing. And, in my experience, some of the worst marketers have MBAs or years of experience. With that in mind, here’s what [employers should] look for in a marketing candidate.”

  1. A person who understands that marketing is a service. The first question to ask any candidate for a marketing job: ‘Define marketing.’ The answers will fall into three categories: (a) ‘Say whut?’ You’d be surprised how many marketers (including people with MBAs) don’t have a working definition of what they do, or plan to do, for a living. (b) ‘Marketing is strategic.’ Some marketers define marketing too broadly. Candidates who hold such bloated notions tend to squander their energy in too many directions. (c) ‘Marketing is a service.’ A top marketing candidate will tend to define marketing as a service that helps sales do its job more easily.”
  2. A person who likes being measured. Strong marketing groups (and the candidates you’d want to hire in them) are all about quantitative measurement. They’re familiar with marketing metrics (like conversion rates) and more than willing to have their work  judged on the basis of verifiable numbers.Weak marketing groups focus on activities, regardless of whether those activities generate sales opportunities or help salespeople close them. Such activities include brochures that nobody reads, fancy ads that generate zero sales leads, trade shows that are networking parties for the marketers, and more.
  3. A person who can write concisely.  We live in a constant state of information overload. Thus, the only marketing messages that are heard and remembered are short, vivid, and original. Unfortunately, some marketers are prone to use $5 words when 50¢ words would do the job better; biz-blab like ‘reach out,’ ‘circle back,’ and ‘pick your brain’; and clichés like ‘disruptive innovation,’ ‘industry-leading,’ and ‘state of the art.’ These sins can be deadly to marketers who must communicate with customers who are notoriously unwilling to wade through thick business prose.”
  4. A person who’s had some experience selling.  Great marketers have a deep respect for the job of selling. They realize that marketing is only meaningful if it helps salespeople do their job, which is much more important than any marketing task. You needn’t hold out for someone who’s sold for a living (although that would be ideal), but it is important that a marketing candidate know what it’s like to actually sell.”

Click the image to read more.

                   CREDIT: Getty Images

 

FREE: 2017 Edition of Careers in Business

11 Apr

Learn about the many opportunities and challenges facing those interested in a career in business. The latest data are included. Lots of data!!
 

Outline of Topics:
  • General Hints
  • Background Data By Occupation
  • Long-term Trends
  • Hot Long-term Business Career Opportunities
  • Bureau Of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook
  • LinkedIn
  • “Find A Job” Resources

 

 

Career Tips from the Best

10 Apr

Here are great YouTube video career tips from six superstars:

  • Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella
  • Alibaba CEO Jack Ma
  • Media mogul Oprah Winfrey
  • Berkhsire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett
  • Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg
  • Tesla CEO Elon Musk

These videos are based on interviews conducted by Evan Carmichael — a Canadian entrepreneur, author, speaker, and business consultant.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Being Real on a Job Interview!

30 Mar

When going on job interviews, regardless of the level of the position, presenting yourself as authentic is essential. Over-inflating your accomplishments or presenting an untrue depiction of your true self often backfires.

Shane Parrish, writing for Quora, offers several valuable insights on this topic. How can a potential employer determine if an applicant is actually intelligent and not just a blowhard?

“I’ve been collecting little heuristics over the years. Here are a few that will get you thinking:

 
Now, take a a look at this short video clip from Inc. And click here to read more from Inc.

 

Glassdoor’s Best Employers for 2017: Multiple Rankings

27 Mar

Each year, career services firm Glassdoor publishes various lists of “best places to work,” based on feedback from those job seekers and employees providing feedback to Glassdoor. By clicking on the image shown below, you can access Glassdoor’s 2017 “best” recommendations.

 

 

What makes Glassdoor’s lists especially valuable are the number of different perspectives that are available:

 

Skills That Entrepreneurs Need

14 Mar

Being an entrepreneur is not easy. It requires creativity, patience, a willingness to take risks, expertise, endurance, and a whole lot more.

According to Growth Hackers’ co-founder and CEO Jonathan Aufray:

“An entrepreneur must be audacious, calculating, enthusiastic, and passionate. Creativity and managerial capabilities are also important to the success of an entrepreneur. An entrepreneur needs to be a talented multi-disciplinary individual, a bit like the growth hacker job description, which is very complex, the entrepreneur job description is even more complicated.”

“Contrary to popular opinion, entrepreneurial skills and qualities can be learned, practiced, and developed. You must, however, make a conscious decision to nurture these qualities and skills. Once you begin to make a conscious effort to acquire these skills, particularly skills in the area where you are deficient, you would have repositioned yourself for tremendous accomplishments as an entrepreneur in the business world.”

Aufray has identified 29 skills as important for successful entrepreneurship. Here are ten of them:

  1. Personal capabilities
  2. Image building
  3. Effective communication
  4. Ability to negotiate
  5. Ability to lead
  6. Ability to sell
  7. Ability to concentrate (focus)
  8. Customer relations
  9. Preparedness to learn
  10. Inquisitiveness

 
Click the image for a full discussion of the above 10 skills and to see Aufray’s whole list of 29 entrepreneurial skills.
 

 

The Best Firms If You Want to Work in Tech

8 Mar

If you want to work for a technology company, TechRepublic has ranked these as the best employers [Click the company names to visit their jobs’ Web sites.]:

  1. Facebook — “Never pay for lunch (or dry cleaning) again when you start your career at Facebook. In addition to health insurance, employees are given benefits such as $700 a year for fitness and $250 annually for running Facebook ads.”
  2. Google — “This pet-friendly workplace is designed so no employee is ever more than 150 feet food.  massages are subsidized, transportation is sustainable, and game rooms are pretty much everywhere. And every employee is encouraged to spend 20 percent of time working on a personal passion project.”
  3. World Wide Technology –“The CEO’s Glassdoor approval rating is 100 percent. About 75 percent of employees use the firm’s telecommuting option. And World Wide Technology has an on-site clinic where employees and family members can see doctors and stay healthy.”
  4. FAST Enterprises — “Its Annual General Meeting (AGM) is an all-expense paid, annual trip for employees and their families where they are recognized for accomplishments. These workers are known as FASTies.”
  5. LinkedIn — “Its speaker series has hosted the likes of President Obama. The cafe has kombucha on tap, and there’s a rock wall right there in the office.”

 
Click the image for a TechRepublic slideshow of TWENTY top technology employers.

Courtesy of Apple


 

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