Tag Archives: promotion

Humanizing and Entertaining Ads

28 Sep

HubSpot recently identified 12 enjoyable video marketing campaigns: “What better medium to propel the new wave of humanized marketing than video? It’s one of the most effective media for marketers. Seventy-three percent of respondents in a 2015 Web Video Marketing Council study indicated that video had a positive impact on their marketing results.

Click here to see all of the campaigns cited by HubSpot (and to read why HubSpot selected these campaigns).
 
Below are videos from HubSpot’s 5 top-rated campaigns.
 

 

 

 

 

 

The Fascinating Evolution of Blogging

27 Sep

Blogging has come a long since its humble origins in the 1990s. Based on Tumblr data, we estimate that there are about 310 million blogs worldwide, with millions and millions of posts each day. So, how has the blogosphere evolved over the years?

Recently, HubSpot’s Amanda Zantal-Wiener helped us answer this question:

“We’ve found that there’s quite a history behind blogs. According to the documentation we uncovered — and will share with you below — they’ve been around since 1994. They looked a lot different back then, and had many different names and meanings.”

  • 1994-1997 — “Many original bloggers, despite not having yet earned that title, were the same people who first understood the value of the  Web in the 1980s. One of them was then Swarthmore College undergrad, Justin Hall, who created a site called links.net in January 1994. It was essentially a review of HTML examples he came across from various online links, but it was enough for the New York Times Magazine to dub him the “founding father of personal bloggers’.”
  • 1998-2001 — “The later part of the 1990s saw an uprising in resources created for bloggers. Open Diary launched in October 1998 and became one of the most pivotal blogging platforms. The name was a nod to its community approach to blogging; it was the first to have a membership model that allowed members of the community to comment on the work of others.”
  • 2002 — “Technorati, one of the first blog search engines (but today a company of “advertising technology specialists”), launched in February 2002. That month, blogger Heather B. Armstrong was fired for writing about her colleagues on her personal blog, Dooce.com. While it’s not clear if she was the first blogger to be terminated because of her personal Web site’s content, it sparked a conversation about privacy and freedom of expression for bloggers.”
  • 2003 — “TypePad and WordPress launched in 2003, offering new platform options to a growing number of bloggers. That year, live blogging was estimated to have started — the Guardian was one of the first outlets on record to make use of live blogging during the 2003 prime minister’s question time.”
  • 2004-2005 — “It wasn’t until the middle part of the decade that visual content really had the opportunity to take root. In February 2004, videographer Steve Garfield , who went on to be one of the Web’s first video bloggers, declared it to be the “year of the video blog.” YouTube launched only a year later in February 2005, shortly thereafter inviting the public to upload their own videos. It actually began as a short-lived dating site. YouTube turned its focus to general video uploads (which seemed to take effect by June 2005). Huffington Post launched that May.”
  • 2006-2007 — Microblogging was introduced (sharing stories, news, and other content in the smallest format possible). “The start of life in 140 characters (or less) began in March 2006, when Twitter co-founder and CEO Jack Dorsey sent out the world’s first tweet. Microblogging continued to gain momentum in February 2007 with the launch of Tumblr — yet another blogging platform that encouraged users to be brief. Being able to comment on blogs was becoming less of a novelty, and more a point of contention.”
  • 2008-2011 — “During this period of four years, there weren’t many major events that propelled how or why people blogged. By 2010, 11% of bloggers reported earning their primary income from blogging.” Google  made some changes that would impact bloggers in 2011 with its rollout of the “Panda” algorithm change. A lot of that had to do with bloggers having a lack of inbound links — a link to your Web site that comes from another one.”
  • 2012In August, a co-founder of Pyra Labs — the creators of Blogger — Evan Williams, created Medium, one of the newest blogging platforms. Today, people can use it to write and publish original content, like most other blogging platforms. But Medium is continuing to blur the line between news reporting and blogging. On its Web site, the company describes itself as serving up ‘daily news reimagined, straight from the people who are making and living it.’ That year, LinkedIn introduced its Influencers program, which recruited notable business figures to guest blog on LinkedIn’s publishing platform.”
  • 2013-present — “Recently, the creators of WordPress announced they would be rolling out the .blog domain. Until November 9, 2016, users have to apply for one of the highly-coveted domains. [and it won’t come cheap]. But here’s the cool thing about .blog — even though it was made by the creators of WordPress, you don’t have to use the WordPress platform in order to build a blog on that domain.”
  • Forecasting the Future — “How blogging continues to change will determine what our careers look like, and  all marketers, corporate or otherwise , are encouraged  to blog on behalf of their respective brands. It might seem like a lot of work, but if the evolution of blogging has indicated nothing else, it’s that the sphere will only continue to expand. And that’s something marketers should continue to pay attention to — not just the growth of blogging, but how many different interpretations [platforms] of it exist.”

 

Click the image to read a lot more by Zantal-Wiener.

 

Americans Don’t Trust Mass Media

20 Sep

Yes, the mass media have been criticized in many quarters for their coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign. But the issue of trust goes far beyond political coverage. It deals more directly with the competition from nontraditional media that has led to (1) more “got you” stories, (2) the quest to be first with a story even if not certain about the facts, (3) the focus on headlines more than content, and much more.

According to a new survey by Gallup:

In 2016, “Americans’ trust and confidence in the mass media ‘to report the news fully, accurately, and fairly’ has dropped to its lowest level in Gallup polling history, with 32% saying they have a great deal or fair amount of trust in the media. This is down eight percentage points from last year.”

Gallup began asking about media trust in 1972, and on a yearly basis since 1997. Over the history of the entire trend, Americans’ trust and confidence hit its highest point in 1976, at 72%, in the wake of widely lauded examples of investigative journalism regarding Vietnam and the Watergate scandal. After staying in the low to mid-50s through the late 1990s and into the early years of the new century, Americans’ trust in the media has fallen slowly and steadily. It has consistently been below a majority level since 2007.”

 
Click the chart to read more.

 

An In-Depth Infographic on Blogging

6 Jul

Thinking of starting or improving your own blog? Do you want your blog to go from good to great?

The Wise Startup Blog has developed a terrific infographic with more than one hundred ideas on developing and posting a blog. Take a look.

 


 

The Fast-Growing Era of Tailored Ads by Country

30 Jun

Unlike in the past when firms could use universal themes in their ads around the globe, with just minor changes, today, companies need to use a more tailored approach in the face of stiff competition.

As an example, KFC has really stepped up its advertising strategy — and not just in the United States. Here are a selection of tailored ads from around the world. We feature YouTube ads from SEVEN countries here.
 

From the USA YouTube Channel: There is now an “extra crispy” Colonel Sanders played by actor George Hamilton, known for his perpetual tan.


 

From the India YouTube Channel: The new limited edition KFC Watt A Box will not only fill you up but also your smartphone.


 

From the UK and Ireland YouTube Channel: KFC Rollerskater — Bring home the weekend with KFC.


 

From the South Africa YouTube Channel: Through #‎TasteGuarantee, KFC is making sure that customers are happy and satisfied with every meal, and continue to get the great tasting food you know and love!


 

From the Hong Kong YouTube Channel: “Finger Lickin’ Good Edible Nail Polish.” [This ad is in Chinese.]


 

From the Philippines YouTube Channel: For those preferring hot tasting chicken, KFC Hot Shots is getting customers all fired up! 


 

From the Thailand YouTube Channel: The legend is back by popular demand — KFC crispy chicken Chilliwack, cheese, onions, peppers , dark burn. [This ad is in Thai.]

 

Twitter Turns to Emojis to Boost Business

16 Jun

We have noted recently (1, 2) that emojis are gaining a much bigger role in marketing — both through videos and social media sites. Now, Twitter is hopping onto the emoji bandwagon.

As George Slefo reports for Advertising Age:

“Advertisers will either cry with laughter or happiness following Twitter’s announcement of emoji based-targeting. Its move precedes World Emoji Day [which is on July 17].”

“Advertisers can target consumers who have tweeted or engaged with tweets that feature emojis. Thus, someone in Chicago who tweets a pizza emoji can be targeted by a local restaurant to come in for a slice of deep dish.”

“More than 110 billion emojis have been tweeted since 2014, according to Twitter, which says they can signal a person’s mood or mindset.”

 
Click the emojis’ image to read more.


 

Pepsi’s 5-Second Emoji Ads

5 May

As we noted recently, companies are finding greater uses for the emoji (“a small digital image or icon used to express an idea, emotion, etc.”) in their marketing efforts.

Pepsi will start using emojis in FIVE-SECOND TV ads later this month, according to E.J. Schultz writing, for Advertising Age:

“For Pepsi, short is sweet when it comes to ads, which is why it is taking the unusual step of running five-second TV ads to support the cola’s new emoji-designed bottles. The brand will run more than 100 online and TV ads beginning in mid-May that are five seconds in length, a Pepsi spokeswoman confirmed. “Consumers want a shorter form of everything. This is our way of transforming media to make it more relevant to consumers.” The firm is also seeking to make ads as contextually relevant as possible. So an ad running during a baseball game will have a baseball theme.”

 
Here is a Pepsi’s YouTube teaser for the new emoji ads. ]Note: The teaser is about 40 seconds.🙂 ]
 

 

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