Tag Archives: customer satisfaction

A Multi-Faceted Look at Customer Perceptions of Companies

6 Apr

Temkin (a customer experience research and consulting company) regularly conducts a number of surveys on customer perceptions of companies based on polls of 10,000 U.S. consumers across a number of industries. For 2017, people were asked about 331 companies across 20 industries. These surveys are then placed into overall and industry rankings.

Click on the links to access specific rankings:

  • 2017 Temkin Experience Ratings — “The Temkin Experience Ratings are based on consumer feedback of their recent interactions with companies. We asked consumers to rate three components of the experience, Success, Effort, and Emotion, on a 7-point scale.”
  • 2016 Temkin Forgiveness Ratings — “The Temkin Forgiveness Ratings are based on consumer feedback on companies with which our survey respondents have recently interacted. We asked consumers how likely they would be to forgive the companies if those firms made a mistake.”
  • 2016 Temkin Trust Ratings — “The Temkin Trust Ratings are based on consumer feedback on companies with which our survey respondents have recently interacted. We asked consumers how much they trust those firms.”
  • 2016 Temkin Customer Service Ratings — “The Temkin Customer Service Ratings are based on feedback gathered from consumers regarding companies they’ve recently interacted with. We asked consumers to rate how satisfied they are with recent customer service experiences on a 7-point scale.”
  • 2016 Temkin Web Experience Ratings — “The Temkin Web Experience Ratings are based on consumer feedback on companies with which our survey respondents have recently interacted. We asked consumers how satisfied they are with the online interactions with those firms.”

These are the 20 industries encompassed in the Temkin ratings: Airlines, Auto Dealers, Banks, Computers & Tablets, Credit Cards, Fast Food, Health Plans, Hotels & Rooms, Insurance, Investments, Parcel Delivery, Rental Cars & Transport, Retailers, Software Firms, Streaming Media, Supermarkets, TV & Appliances, TV/Internet Service, Utilities, Wireless Carriers.
 
 

 

What Customers Want from a Program Loyalty

3 Apr

The quest for customer loyalty continues to be both a critical goal and a major challenge for companies of all types and sizes. [See 1, 2, 3.]

Today, we highlight an infographic from Colourfast (an international paper and plastic card printer based in Ontario, Canada) that looks at “what customers want to know before joining your loyalty program.”

Why is this perspective of customer loyalty programs to companies? According to Colourfast, American households have memberships in 29 loyalty programs but are active in just 12 of them; and a large percentage of shoppers do not even sign up for loyalty programs because of the hassle involved.

 


 

Be Careful in Making Promises to Customers

2 Mar

In the current highly competitive global marketplace, marketers face a difficult balancing act. On the one, they must promote their goods or services as superior to other firms’ offerings. On the other hand, if customers become unhappy because they buy something that does not meet their expectations, they may be lost to the overpromising firm forever. What we should do? Here’s one perspective from a company dealing with high-value clients.

As Joshua Hebert (CEO of Magellan Jets) writes for Fortune magazine:

“We know that everyone stumbles, and when that happens, the most important thing to do is minimize the damage and turn the mistakes into a positive. One of our most memorable setbacks was with a private travel customer who wanted us to help out when one of our competitors let her down. This was no small deal — one of the top celebrities in the world had a mechanical issue with her jet, and needed us to get her from London to New York overnight. What we did next wasn’t the best idea: We promised the world. Although we didn’t quite have everything lined up, we said we could make it happen on a moment’s notice. When we put the pieces together for the flight, we found the pilots would have too much time in the air that day. That would violated safety standards, so we had to tell them we could not complete the flight.”

“Here are a few things to keep in mind when big mistakes feel like the end of the world. Don’t delay bad news. If you don’t let people know about an issue, you’re hurting them and potentially creating an even bigger problem. Trust yourself When you make a mistake and say, ‘Here’s what I’m willing to do to fix it, and here’s what I’m not willing to do,’ it lets people know what’s most important to you. Being honest and only committing to submit high-quality work are examples of standards to stick by, even in tough situations. Institutionalize your lessons. It’s important to prevent mistakes from reoccurring. After the celebrity incident, we added a new flight support element to our team. Now, when “ASAP” trips are booked, we call customers every 15 minutes within a few hours of the flight for updates on their upcoming flight. Even if there is nothing to report, we touch base so there is no miscommunication.”

 

Click the image to learn about Magellan Jets.

 

How Big a Hurdle Is Ad Blocking in 2017?

17 Feb

Ad blocking is becoming an enormous problem for online marketers, going from a nuisance a couple of years ago to a major threat today. ARE YOU PREPARED TO HANDLE IT?

Technopedia describes ad blockers as follows:

“An ad blocker is a program that will remove different kinds of advertising from a Web user’s experience online. These programs target certain kinds of ads, such as pop-ups, banner ads ,and other common forms of online ad blockers work in many different ways. Some are standalone programs, while others are features of more comprehensive customizing services, or add-ons for a particular browser or operating system. Some browser-specific programs, like PithHelmet for Safari, or other programs for browsers, like Opera, are designed to work well in a particular environment. Others work with Windows or another operating system to block pop-ups or other kinds of ads.”

“Users have a wide range of options for blocking out different kinds of ads. Some programs delete cookies and other Web markers to effectively limit ads. Web proxy programs like Privoxy can be effective ad blockers. Some users will choose to block Adobe Flash in order to block annoying video ads, which are now common on some websites. There are also freeware programs that may use simple principles to block out advertising.”

So, how much of a threat is ad blocking in 2017? Even though eMarketer has scaled back its estimates slightly; ad blocking is still growing significantly. As eMarketer notes:

“eMarketer has scaled back its estimates of ad blocking users in the U.S., reducing the number to 75.1 million. At that level, more than one-quarter (27.5%) of US internet users will use ad blockers this year. While the estimate has been reduced, growth is still significant, at 16.2% in 2017.”

“Ad blocking is much more common among desktop/laptop users than smartphone users. For smartphones, the incidence of ad blocking is less than 8%. That’s partly because mobile ad blockers are often not as effective — especially within apps — as they are on desktops and laptops. Ad blocking continues to be far more prevalent among younger people. This year, 41.1% of millennials will use ad blockers, r estimates. The use is lower among Gen X internet users at 26.9%, and for baby boomers, ad blocking is at 13.9%.”

 
Click the image to read more.

US Ad Blocking User Penetration, Desktop/Laptop vs. Smartphone, 2014-2018 (% of population)

 

What Was Hot in 1997?

16 Feb

We tend to spend a lot of time looking at the “hot new things,” such as connected vehicles, virtual assistants, and a lot more. But, as marketers, we seldom look back to the past to see what was hot then in terms of fads and long-running successes. What hot high-tech products from 20 years ago can YOU name?

Recently, CNET published an entertaining slideshow: “Flashback fun! Return with us now to the thrilling days of the late 1990s, when the Interweb was young, the CD was king, and the cloud was a white, fluffy thing that floated above your head while you gabbed on your cordless telephone.”

 

Click the image to see the CNET slideshow. Which of the items shown in the slideshow were fads; which were long-run successes?


 

Don’ts for Businesses Using Social Media

30 Jan

In this new era of fake news, alternative truth, and inflammatory messages on social media, it is a good time for us to appraise (or reappraise) our own use of social media. Are we doing the best we can to avoid careless mistakes or inflammatory language?

Recently, Annie Pilon described “20 Taboo Topics to Stay Away from on Your Company’s Social Media Channels” for Small Business Trends. Here are some of her observations. PLEASE keep them in mind when utilizing social media and reacting to comments by others:

“If you use social media to promote your business online, you’ve probably put a lot of thought into what types of posts to share. But sometimes it can be just as important to consider what NOT to post on social media.”

             “Making fun of specific groups of people can go too far.

Even the occasional complaint about customers can be enough to damage your brand.

Avoid complaining about your employees online.

Customers want to know that you have a team that they can trust.

Nonconstructive criticism about public figures can seem petty to your social media followers.

You don’t want to be too intrusive when asking questions of your followers.

Be careful not to share anything that’s not true, as it can make your business look bad and lead to your followers being misinformed.

Healthy competition can be good for a business, even on social media. But there’s a big difference between a friendly back-and-forth and trash-talking.

Social media also isn’t the place to share sensitive or confidential information about customers.

Don’t share with followers every time you’re having a bad day or just feeling ‘blah’ about your business.

Posting anything illegal, whether it’s drug use or even just speeding, is a very bad idea.

Stay away from sharing any content that could be considered controversial.

It’s also best not to post anything that’s irrelevant to your audience.”

 

Click the image to learn more from Pilon.


 

Great Books to Read in 2017

26 Jan

As we continue to look ahead to 2017, there are various books that provide valuable information and that are highly rated by reviewers. Here are a few sources for YOU to check out, by topic.

Click the images to read the reviews.
 

“5 Must Read Books That’ll Inspire Entrepreneurs in 2017”


 

“12 New Books to Help You Build Wealth and Get more More Done in 2017”


 

“11 Great Business Books to Read Right Now”

 

“20 Books Every Marketer Should Read in 2017”

 

“Top 15 Best Books on Social Media Marketing for 2017”

 

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