Tag Archives: infographic

Getting People to Spend More Time on Your Web Page

17 Jan

Consider these observations from Vikas Agrawal, writing for CustomerThink:

“Did you know that humans now have shorter attention spans than goldfishes? A 2015 study conducted by Microsoft in Canada showed that the average attention span of humans has decreased by 4 seconds in the past 15 years. From 12 seconds in 2000, last year’s study showed that it is now at 8.25 seconds only, largely due to the advent of smartphones. This is actually a tad shorter compared to the attention span of goldfishes who are clocking in at 9 seconds.”

 

Now, consider the work on infographics by InfobrandZ:

“Pictures speak to us. They convey ideas that spark both our memories and our imaginations. Looking at a picture is indeed like reading a thousand words. More than that, it allows us to visualize relationships in a way that is not possible with words. And in that fact lies the power of Infographic Marketing.”

A Customer Service Infographic

9 Jan

Last week, we wrote about one aspect of customer service — the firm’s return policy — and its impact on consumer satisfaction.

Today, we are presenting a broad-based infographic on good customer service that was developed by  Exponential Solutions (The CUBE) Marketing. Thanks to Steve Hashman, one of the company founders, for providing the infographic.
 

 

What Are the Toughest Languages to Translate?

31 Dec

As we approach the end of 2016, we have presented some of the most popular of the nearly 1,500 posts that have appeared on Evans on Marketing. Today, to finish 2016, we discuss how difficult it is compete in multiple languages.

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When firms go global, language translation becomes more complex and time-consuming.

Dana Translation notes that:

“In today’s global environment and economy, interesting and important come in many languages. People and organizations often need to unlock the meaning within those documents with a perfect translation that conveys the intent of the document.”

“Many people don’t realize that languages don’t have a direct word-to-correlation, so a good translation requires an understanding of the nuances and shades of meaning in each language. Rules of grammar and the way people express themselves using figures of speech vary from culture to culture, and words with the same meaning may have different connotations that can slant the feeling that a translation conveys if chosen unwisely. That’s why machine translations so often go wrong, and why it pays to have a comprehensive translation service on your side.”

 

According to Dana, these are the hardest languages to translate.

 

The Psychology of Color

21 Dec

As we approach the end of 2016, we are going to present some of the most popular of the nearly 1,500 posts that have appeared on Evans on Marketing. Today, we cover how colors affect consumers’ product perceptions.
 

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From a marketing perspective, we tend to believe “perception is reality” — which means that what shoppers believe about product features is more important than the reality of those features.

With this in mind, Rachel Griffith has written a fascinating article for Fast Company on the impact of color on consumer perceptions. As she notes:

“When it comes to identifying your brand, your logo is probably the first thing your customers will think of. While honing the narrative and message behind your logo should of course be your primary concern, research suggests that your logo’s design — and specifically its colors — have more bearing on your customers’ opinions than you might think. Neuroscientist Bevil Conway, who has focused his recent research almost entirely on the neural machinery behind color, believes the science behind color processing to be very powerful and completely underexploited.”

“According to research complied by web design and marketing company WebPageFX, people make a subconscious judgment about a product in less than 90 seconds of viewing, and a majority of these people base that assessment on color alone. In fact, almost 85% of consumers cite color as the primary reason they buy a particular product, and 80% of people believe color increases brand recognition.”

To learn more about the perceptions of people with regard to red, yellow, blue, orange, green, and purple, click on the infographic from Fast Company.

 


 

A Personalized Self-Assessment Infographic

15 Dec

As we approach the end of 2016, we are going to present some of the most popular of the nearly 1,500 posts that have appeared on Evans on Marketing. Today, we cover personal self-assessment.

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No matter the stage in your career (or life), it is imperative that you regularly do a self-assessment. In the infographic below, there is a 20-item self-assessment quiz for you to take.

How do YOU fare on this quiz? What activities do YOU need to modify to improve your career profile? How can YOU be happier? 🙂

 

Personality Types and Career Choice

25 Oct

Our personalities affect every facet of our lives, including the jobs for which we are best suited. So, it is vital to understand your personality and how it will impact on your career success.

Let us turn to a large-scale study of 16 personality types by Truity Psychometrics titled “Does Your Personality Type Predict Your Career Destiny?”  [Click the preceding link to read in detail about the study.] Thousands of 12,000 people completed all or most of the research questionnaire for the online Truity study:

“Personality type assessments are one of the most commonly used tools in career planning. Extensive research, much of it based on the MBTI® assessment, has examined occupational trends among the 16 types, and studies have found clear differences in the occupations chosen by people of different personality types.”

 

“Our goal in this study was to objectively evaluate the assumptions that we make about the career paths of the 16 personality types. To this end, we aim to do a comprehensive analysis of various career outcomes among the 16 personality types and examine what differences, if any, exist between types.”

 

Here as an infographic look at the study results at Tech.co.


 

Public Wi-Fi: Popular, But Not Secure

20 Oct

Have you ever used free public Wi-Fi at the airport, Starbucks, Panera Bread, or other unsecured venues?  Is it safe from hacking, identity theft, and other invasions of privacy? No!! So, why do we use it?

According to Ian Barker, writing for Beta News:

“There’s an expectation that public Wi-Fi will be available pretty much everywhere we go these days. We access it almost without thinking about it, yet public networks rarely encrypt data leaving users vulnerable.”

“A new survey of more than 2,000 business users by networking company Xirrus finds that while 91 percent of respondents don’t believe public Wi-Fi is secure, 89 percent use it anyway. The report shows that 48 percent of Wi-Fi users connect to public Wi-Fi at least three times per week and 31 percent connect to public Wi-Fi every day.”

“When on public Wi-Fi, 83 percent of users access their E-mail, whether it’s for work or personal reasons, and 43 percent access work-specific information. ‘Today, the convenience of using public Wi-Fi, for a variety of work and recreational uses, supersedes security, which puts both individuals and businesses at risk. Most businesses do not offer secure connectivity options for customers and guests.’ says Shane Buckley, CEO of Xirrus.”

 

Take a look at the following infographic. Still think it’s a good idea to access private information via public Wi-Fi?


 

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