Tag Archives: opportunity

Getting People to Spend More Time on Your Web Page

17 Jan

Consider these observations from Vikas Agrawal, writing for CustomerThink:

“Did you know that humans now have shorter attention spans than goldfishes? A 2015 study conducted by Microsoft in Canada showed that the average attention span of humans has decreased by 4 seconds in the past 15 years. From 12 seconds in 2000, last year’s study showed that it is now at 8.25 seconds only, largely due to the advent of smartphones. This is actually a tad shorter compared to the attention span of goldfishes who are clocking in at 9 seconds.”

 

Now, consider the work on infographics by InfobrandZ:

“Pictures speak to us. They convey ideas that spark both our memories and our imaginations. Looking at a picture is indeed like reading a thousand words. More than that, it allows us to visualize relationships in a way that is not possible with words. And in that fact lies the power of Infographic Marketing.”

Self-Branding for Professional Success: An In-Depth Discussion

10 Jan

Want to learn more about branding and its features—including the evolution of branding and brand positioning? Want to learn more about how to create and nurture your own self-brand to enhance your professional growth opportunities? If you answer yes to either question, then this article is “must reading.”

The first part of the article (pages 1-10) covers the evolution of branding concepts, brand positioning, brand equity, the role of communications (including new media), and corporate branding.

The second part of the article (starting on the bottom of page 10) focuses on such aspects of self-branding as these: the factors impacting one’s professional self-brand, steps in self-branding, personal branding SWOT analysis, a career ladder approach to self-branding, self-brand management and re-invention, and creating and sustaining an online self-brand.

To enhance the discussion, there are several practical and colorful figures that illustrate the keys to superior professional self-branding.

[Click the IN logo at the bottom of the slideshow to access and download a PDF version of the paper.]

 

 

A Customer Service Infographic

9 Jan

Last week, we wrote about one aspect of customer service — the firm’s return policy — and its impact on consumer satisfaction.

Today, we are presenting a broad-based infographic on good customer service that was developed by  Exponential Solutions (The CUBE) Marketing. Thanks to Steve Hashman, one of the company founders, for providing the infographic.
 

 

Customer Service Means a Good Return Policy

3 Jan

Now that the 2016 holiday shopping season is over (except for spending gift cards), a vital question to consider from both the customer’s and retailer’s perspective is: What kind of return policy best serves my needs? For many consumers, the answer may be: an unlimited time frame to return a purchase. For many retailers, the answer may be: holding down costs as much as possible. In either case, the return policy is a key element of customer service.

These are some return practices disliked by consumers: [Note: Many good retailers do not follow these practices.]

  • An overly short time period to make a return for a full refund.
  • The amount of the refund for a gift item when the gift recipient does not have a receipt.
  • A discounted refund merely for opening the product’s box.
  • The time to process a refund for a return.
  • Items excluded from refunds, such as computer software.
  • The shipping fee to return a purchase made online.

 
Two of the acknowledged leaders are Amazon, whose return policy is easy to use and consumer friendly, and L.L. Bean, whose return policy has received various honors and awards.

As a prelude to a YouTube video about returns at L.L. Bean, Business Insider’s Sam Rega recently stated: Here’s what makes L.L.Bean’s ‘100% satisfaction guarantee’ the best return policy of any retailer.”
 

 

What Are the Toughest Languages to Translate?

31 Dec

As we approach the end of 2016, we have presented some of the most popular of the nearly 1,500 posts that have appeared on Evans on Marketing. Today, to finish 2016, we discuss how difficult it is compete in multiple languages.

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When firms go global, language translation becomes more complex and time-consuming.

Dana Translation notes that:

“In today’s global environment and economy, interesting and important come in many languages. People and organizations often need to unlock the meaning within those documents with a perfect translation that conveys the intent of the document.”

“Many people don’t realize that languages don’t have a direct word-to-correlation, so a good translation requires an understanding of the nuances and shades of meaning in each language. Rules of grammar and the way people express themselves using figures of speech vary from culture to culture, and words with the same meaning may have different connotations that can slant the feeling that a translation conveys if chosen unwisely. That’s why machine translations so often go wrong, and why it pays to have a comprehensive translation service on your side.”

 

According to Dana, these are the hardest languages to translate.

 

Technology and Planned Obsolescence

27 Dec

As we approach the end of 2016, we are going to present some of the most popular of the nearly 1,500 posts that have appeared on Evans on Marketing. Today, we cover the topic of planned obsolescence.

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As defined in Evans Berman’s Marketing: “Planned obsolescence is a marketing practice that capitalizes on short-run material wearout, style changes, and functional product changes. In material planned obsolescence, firms choose materials and components that are subject to comparatively early breakage, wear, rot, or corrosion. In style planned obsolescence, a firm makes minor changes to differentiate the new year’s offering from the prior year’s. With functional planned obsolescence, a firm introduces new product features or improvements to generate consumer dissatisfaction with currently owned products.”

In recent years, NO company has applied planned obsolescence more than Apple. Yes, this practice has led to rapid advances in the technology of music players, tablets, and smartphones. But, does Apple’s philosophy also spur consumers to buy new product versions that they don’t need?

Apple has recently been criticized for its planned obsolescence strategy. Do YOU agree with this criticism?

Consider these observations by Catherine Rampell, writing for the New York Times:

“The new software and recent app updates from Apple offer fancy new features that existing users want; maybe the battery is sealed with tiny five-point screws for aesthetic considerations. Perhaps, but this isn’t the first time that tech analysts and random crazies on the Internet have noted that breakdowns in older Apple products can often coincide with when upgrades come onto the market. Many have taken this as evidence of ‘planned obsolescence,’ a term that dates to the Great Depression, when a real-estate broker suggested that the government should stimulate the economy by placing artificial expiration dates on consumer products so people would buy more.”

“There is, however, a simple way to effectively render an old product obsolete without fleecing your existing customers. Instead of degrading the old model, companies can offer innovations in the new model that make upgrading irresistible. Apple succeeded at doing this for a while, offering new iPhones that included major improvements. In the past, consumers were so excited about the cool new features, like Siri, the voice-activated interface, that they may not have minded (or even noticed) if their old phones started to deteriorate; they planned on upgrading anyway. This time around, that’s less true. The iPhone 5S and 5C offer fewer quantum improvements. Consumers are more likely to want their old phones to continue working at peak condition in perpetuity, and to feel cheated when they don’t.”

[Note from Evans on Marketing: Many consumers still believe that Apple practices planned obsolescence with its latest lines of phones, tablets, and computers. In 2016, for the first time in years, had a quarterly sales drop. Do YOU agree or disagree?]

 

 
Click the image to read more.

Illustration by Kelsey Dake

 

Congratulations Hofstra Marketing

26 Dec

The Marketing Faculty in the Zarb School of Business at Hofstra University is proud that our programs are included in TWO new 2017 rankings by College Choice, which “is an independent online publication dedicated to helping students and their families find the right college. We publish rankings and reviews that make choosing the best college easier, as well as resources to help students get into, pay for, and thrive at the college of their choice.”
 

Top 50 Bachelor’s in Marketing Programs for 2017

“Marketing managers—as well as their close cousins, advertising and promotions managers—generate interest in products and services. They work with just about everyone in an organization to do one thing really well: getting the word out! That’s not always as easy as it sounds. In order to get the word out, marketers have to understand what their promoting as well as the demand that’s out there for it—or in some cases, isn’t out there at all!There’s also the question of competition—in order to succeed, you have to know your enemy, and marketers will have intimate knowledge of their competitors’ products and services as well in order to best position themselves for success. They are also media wizards who use all sorts of mediums and platforms to get their message out.”

“There’s good news for the future of this profession, too. Nearly all sectors of marketing are slated to grow between 5 and 9 percent over the next several years according to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, and pay continues to look rewarding with median annual wages holding steady between $95,000 and $130,000 per year. Not too shabby!”

Number 36: “Through Hofstra’s Frank G. Zarb School of Business, students can earn a Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Marketing. Dual degree programs are also available, allowing students to earn a bachelor’s and a master’s degree at an accelerated pace. Regardless of the degree program, Hofstra’s Department of Marketing & International Business provides exposure to award-winning faculty, internships with well-known companies in a variety of industries, and study abroad options.”

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Top 35 Master’s in Marketing Programs for 2017

“From building an entire brand ethos to developing a network of relationships with people equally committed to innovative and sustainable progress, a career in marketing has literally innumerable possibilities. The degree can be applied to nearly every aspect of the business industry as well as the non-profit, government, health, and education sectors. Whatever your passion, marketing can be easily combined with it.”

“The Bureau of Labor Statistics anticipates a 19 percent growth in marketing research analysis in the next ten years, and a 9 percent growth in marketing management. On average, those with bachelors degrees in marketing make around $62,000 annually; however, for those who go on to get a masters degree—either in marketing specifically, or a MBA with specialization in marketing—those numbers easily double. In juxtaposing the job growth with the return on investment, it becomes clear that obtaining a graduate degree in marketing will serve you now and in the long run.”

Number 29: “Marketing graduate students, working toward a Masters of Science in Marketing, at Hofstra University take classes on distribution, internet marketing, social media utilization, marketing across cultures, analytics, customer behavior, innovation and new product marketing, business-to-business marketing, and sustainability marketing. Most notably, Hofstra students are prepared to become leaders in middle- to upper-level positions in an range of business settings. The program at Hofstra is unique in its emphasis on diversity and global perspective. Students are taught to communicate effectively, whatever the setting, to work well in teams, and to evaluate the social and ethical responsibilities of marketing in business organizations. They are also able to work and study outside of the traditional classroom and participate in several of real-world projects.”

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