Tag Archives: opportunity

Are You Vigilant in Protecting Your Reputation?

22 Feb

Whether we are reviewing our company’s reputation or our own personal self-brand, the results may be challenging because of the spread of fake news and the proliferation of negative social media comments. What we hope for perceptions of our reputation may not be in sync with the way others see us. And having a favorable reputation is critically important.

What can we do to have a well-respected reputation? Consider these suggestions from Sapir Segal, writing for Marketo:

Social media marketing requires a lot of patience and maintenance. Once you’ve established your social media presence and are generating engagement and measuring your ROI, the most important stage is to protect your hard work. Monitoring and protecting your social media presence from decline or extinction is just as pivotal as demonstrating it in the first place.”

“Controversial posts, account hacks, and inadvertent mistakes are all examples of threats that could harm your brand’s reputation. Luckily for marketers, many of these troubling factors are avoidable or correctable. To protect your social media reputation, you must have a careful eye for potential problems, a plan for handling crises, and a team you trust to write and manage the content. Here are three common mistakes that plague social media marketers: (1) unsupervised content publishing; (2) controversial content; and (3) account hacking.”

 

Click the image to read Segal’s solutions to these problems!

 

Leadership Infographic (2): Are You Using the Best Approach for YOU?

21 Feb

As we posted yesterday, there are various leadership styles from which to select. Today, we ask: What leadership style is best for you? This infographic is also from Headway Capital.
 

Click on the image for a larger view.

 
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Leadership Infographic (1): What Type of Leader Are You?

20 Feb

What is your leadership style? Are you happy with it? Are there areas you need to work on to improve?

As Barbara Davidson notes for Headway Capital:

“Leadership can be a rewarding experience, but there are many different ways to lead your team to success. Do you know which is best for you? Could you be a pace-setting leader, dishing out hard deadlines to motivate fast results? Or maybe you’re a coach, working closely with your star players to help them achieve top results. Whatever your management style, the important thing is to know what your strengths are and which skills need to develop. Our new infographic offers a great flowchart to help you identify what type of leader you are.”

 

Click on the image for a larger view.

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Connected Vehicles Generate BIG Data

14 Feb

This post is a follow-up to yesterday’s.

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As we know, the auto industry is in the midst of a major technological revolution. Although self-driving vehicles have garnered a huge amount of attention, “connected” vehicles will also have an enormous impact on marketing. Why? From the consumer’s point of view, connectivity means better Bluetooth interactivity, GPS systems, entertainment systems, roadside assistance, diagnostics, and more. From the seller’s point of view, connectivity means access to lots of big data.

Consider these observations from Felix Richter, writing for Statista:

“Modern cars are equipped with more than 100 sensors that create a constant stream of data. Measuring things like location, performance, physical parameters, and driving behavior, often several times per second, the amount of data generated by these sensors is immense. According to a McKinsey estimate, connected cars create up to 25 gigabytes of data per hour. That’s the equivalent of nearly 30 hours of HD video playback and more than a month’s worth of 24-hour music streaming.”

“According to the analysts in charge of our Digital Market Outlook, the data created by connected cars have a lot of potential in terms of monetization. Think insurance companies for example, who would likely be willing to pay good money to find out more about our driving habits. For more information about this exciting new market, please download our free market report Connected Car: Vehicle Services.”

 
Take a look at this chart to see how big the data collected from connected vehicles really are.


 

The State of Big Data in 2017

13 Feb

As we have noted several times over the years (see for example: 1, 2, 3), big data are an important element of the marketer’s toolbox. So, what is the state of big data in 2017?

Recently, eMarketer published its Big Data Roundup for 2017:

“Most key objectives of marketers are rooted in big data, from targeting and customer relationship management to attribution — and even artificial intelligence. eMarketer has curated this Roundup of articles, insights, and interviews to help you understand why and how advertisers and marketers are putting these large, complex data sets to work.”

 

“Big data are gradually becoming a part of U.S. business, and companies that are able to take advantage of their scope and complexity appear to be seeing benefits. In January 2017, research from NewVantage Partners  revealed that at least half of organizations are incorporating some type of big data initiative. Not all areas businesspeople were polled on got high marks. Of the big data initiatives executives were asked about, establishing a data-driven culture and making over their business for the future had the lowest success rates, both at 27.9%.”

 

Click the image to view the Roundup report.

 

How the Global Population Is Evolving

10 Feb
For many marketers, understanding the shifts in the global population is imperative. Take a look at this video to learn more.

 


 

Which Elements of YOUR Emotional Intelligence Do YOU Need to Improve?

9 Feb

Emotional intelligence is a concept we should understand as marketers and in our own personal terms. According to Psychology Today, emotional intelligence is “the ability to identify and manage your own emotions and the emotions of others. It is generally said to include three skills: (1) Emotional awareness, including the ability to identify your own emotions and those of others. (2) The ability to harness emotions and apply them to tasks like thinking and problems solving. (3) The ability to manage emotions, including the ability to regulate your own emotions, and the ability to cheer up or calm down another person.”

Daniel Goleman and Richard E. Boyatzis, writing for Harvard Business Review, describe emotional intelligence in some depth:

“There are many models of emotional intelligence, each with its own set of abilities; they are often lumped together as ‘EQ’ in the popular vernacular. We prefer ‘EI,’ which we define as comprising four domains: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management. Nested within these domains are twelve EI competencies, learned and learnable capabilities that allow outstanding performance at work or as a leader . These include areas in which we are clearly strong: empathy, positive outlook, and self-control. But they also include crucial abilities such as achievement, influence, conflict management, teamwork and inspirational leadership. These skills require just as much engagement with emotions as the first set, and should be just as much a part of any aspiring leader’s development priorities.”

 

The twelve EI competencies are highlighted by More Than Sound. WHICH OF THEM ARE YOUR STRENGTHS AND WHICH OF THEM DO YOU NEED TO IMPROVE?

Self-Awareness (1) Emotional Self-Awareness:  “Emotionally self-aware leaders not only can be candid and authentic, they also can speak with conviction about their vision.”

Self-Management — (2) Emotional Self-Control: Leaders with self-control stay calm and clear-headed while under stress or during a crisis and maintain emotional balance.” (3) Achievement Orientation: “Leaders who have high standards for themselves and for others set measurable but challenging goals.” (4) Positive Outlook: Such a leader see others positively, and still expects the best of them (with a ‘glass half-full’ outlook).” (5) Adaptability: “This leader can juggle multiple demands, but remain focused on a group’s goals.”

Social Awareness (6) Empathy: “Such leaders listen attentively while understanding other’s perspectives, get along well with people of diverse backgrounds and cultures, and express their ideas in ways others understand.” (7) Organizational Awareness: “This leader can detect networking opportunities, read key power relationships, and understand the guiding values and unspoken rules that operate among people.”

Relationship Management — (8) Influence: “These leaders know how to appeal to others and how to build buy-in from key people.” (9) Coach and Mentor: “This leader has a genuine interest in helping others, and gives timely and constructive feedback to coworkers.” (10) Conflict Management: “They take time to understand different perspectives and work to find a common ground upon which everyone can agree.” (11) Inspirational Leadership:  “They articulate a shared mission in a way that inspires others to follow.” (12) Teamwork: “These leaders create an atmosphere of respect, helpfulness, and cooperation.”

 

 

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