Tag Archives: tips

Have YOU Thought About an Infographic Résumé?

6 Jun

It is a very cluttered job marketplace now. Hundreds — if not thousands — of job applicants apply for attractive jobs. So, how you stand out better in a crowd? Think of devising a highly visual infographic résumé.

According to Margaret Magnarelli, writing for Monster.com:

“There’s no question: You’re far more interesting than your résumé lets on. You have an A+ work ethic, an impressive portfolio of skills, and an epic list of accomplishments to your name. You make scintillating water cooler conversation, to boot. Everyone who knows you knows that you’re at the cutting edge of your field. So why are you still sending out résumés that look not so different from the ones your mom and dad sent out 30 years ago?”

“Text-only résumés are yesterday’s news. The infographic or visual résumé — which uses charts, icons, and other graphic design elements to show vs. tell a person’s professional story — is the new darling of the recruiting world. A picture is, after all, worth 1,000 words.”

Click on the image to see several infographic résumé examples from Monster.com.

Click here for the source of this chart.

 

There are many sites that offer FREE infographic résumé templates. Here are a few of them (in no particular order!):

 

Video Tips to Help Improve YOUR Self-Confidence

29 May

Are there times when YOU don’t feel confident to speak in public, pursue a new job, ask for a promotion, etc.? This happens to most of us at one time or another. What can YOU do to be more motivated and self-confident? LEARN from and enjoy the six video clips that are shown below! 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

This first video is to give you a chuckle and psych you up for the other — more serious — videos.
 

 
This next video has been viewed more than 9 million times. And the others have all been viewed several hundred thousand times or more!!!
 

 

 

 

 

 

Ever Wondered What You Can Do with Google Analytics?

9 May

All almost all of us have heard of Google Analytics. So, what is it and what information can be generated from using it?

As described by Google:

“Google Analytics gives you the digital analytics tools you need to analyze data from all touchpoints in one place, for a deeper understanding of the customer experience. You can then share the insights that matter with your whole organization. Build a complete picture: Understand your site and app users to better evaluate the performance of your content, products, and more. Get insight only Google can give you: Access Google’s proprietary audience data and machine learning capabilities to help get the most out of your data. Connect your digital analytics to results: Google Analytics is built to work with Google’s media and publisher products so you can use your digital analytics insights to drive real impact. Make your digital analytics data work for you: Process and share massive amounts of data quickly with an easy-to-use interface combined with shareable reports.”

Click here to read more about the capabilities of Google Analytics; and click here for a free sign-up for Google Analytics.

Morgan Jones — writing for Practical E-Commerce — provides a number of valuable tips for small and medium-sized businesses on how to better use Google Analytics data:

Niche E-commerce merchants must focus on cash flow. They do not have large capital reserves to support unprofitable investments. Although growing sales is good for the ego, growing cash flow is what puts food on the table. In this article, I’ll address how to use Google Analytics to track profitability by product category — reporting on sales, cost of goods sold, and advertising expense — to maximize cash flow.”

  • Reporting Sales by Product Category — Google Analytics E-commerce tracking can report sales by product category. To view sales by category, go to Conversions > E-commerce > Product Performance and select ‘Product Category.’”
  • Reporting Cost of Goods Sold by Product Category — Google Analytics has a feature to import product cost data. To set this up, first create a new custom metric at Admin > Property > Custom Definitions > Custom Metrics.”
  • Reporting Advertising Cost by Product Category — Setting up a reporting dashboard to track gross profit after advertising cost enables merchants to identify which categories generate the most cash flow. The optimal way to report advertising cost by product category is to structure advertising campaigns and ad groups to align with product categories. That way Google AdWords, Bing Ads, and other campaigns and their ad groups can be combined with category sales to report gross profit after advertising.”

Click the image to read a lot about Jones’ how-to tips.

 


 

Attributes That Employers Study for Their Marketing Hires

25 Apr

What attributes do employers most value when considering candidates for marketing positions? Certainly, there are many possible answers to this question depending on the company, the specific job, and other criteria.

Nonetheless, here is an interesting delineation of factors that employers consider, as suggested by Geoffrey James for Inc.:

“Hiring great marketers can be challenging, though. Some marketers are great at appearing to be useful when they’re really accomplishing next to nothing. And, in my experience, some of the worst marketers have MBAs or years of experience. With that in mind, here’s what [employers should] look for in a marketing candidate.”

  1. A person who understands that marketing is a service. The first question to ask any candidate for a marketing job: ‘Define marketing.’ The answers will fall into three categories: (a) ‘Say whut?’ You’d be surprised how many marketers (including people with MBAs) don’t have a working definition of what they do, or plan to do, for a living. (b) ‘Marketing is strategic.’ Some marketers define marketing too broadly. Candidates who hold such bloated notions tend to squander their energy in too many directions. (c) ‘Marketing is a service.’ A top marketing candidate will tend to define marketing as a service that helps sales do its job more easily.”
  2. A person who likes being measured. Strong marketing groups (and the candidates you’d want to hire in them) are all about quantitative measurement. They’re familiar with marketing metrics (like conversion rates) and more than willing to have their work  judged on the basis of verifiable numbers.Weak marketing groups focus on activities, regardless of whether those activities generate sales opportunities or help salespeople close them. Such activities include brochures that nobody reads, fancy ads that generate zero sales leads, trade shows that are networking parties for the marketers, and more.
  3. A person who can write concisely.  We live in a constant state of information overload. Thus, the only marketing messages that are heard and remembered are short, vivid, and original. Unfortunately, some marketers are prone to use $5 words when 50¢ words would do the job better; biz-blab like ‘reach out,’ ‘circle back,’ and ‘pick your brain’; and clichés like ‘disruptive innovation,’ ‘industry-leading,’ and ‘state of the art.’ These sins can be deadly to marketers who must communicate with customers who are notoriously unwilling to wade through thick business prose.”
  4. A person who’s had some experience selling.  Great marketers have a deep respect for the job of selling. They realize that marketing is only meaningful if it helps salespeople do their job, which is much more important than any marketing task. You needn’t hold out for someone who’s sold for a living (although that would be ideal), but it is important that a marketing candidate know what it’s like to actually sell.”

Click the image to read more.

                   CREDIT: Getty Images

 

FREE Marketing Planning Tools!

17 Apr

Systematic, integrated, goal-oriented marketing plans are vital for long-run success. For example, see “Developing a Marketing Plan”.

Here are a number of marketing plan templates and sample marketing plans that provide good insights on how to better develop and enact marketing plans. Click on the links to access these templates and sample plans.

 
Here is the in-depth planning tool from Marketing Plan Now.

 

Ethical Selling: Not Necessarily an Oxymoron

4 Apr

Each year, Gallup conducts a survey on “Honesty/Ethics in Professions.” Here are the most recent results. As we can see, professionals in the health care professions are considered the most honest and ethical by Americans. On the other hand, car and insurance salespeople, advertising practitioners, and stockbrokers are rated quite low on these attributes. 
 

 

So what can these marketing professionals do to improve their standing among the public?

Consider these observations from Drew Hendricks, writing for Inc.:

“Sales itself is a fact of life; there’s something to sell to someone who wants to buy it; and salespeople are going to exist. Sales organizations need to ‘make a stand for ethical selling. Make sure it’s in your culture and communicate the importance and responsibility your salespeople and sales leadership have to represent the career of professional selling.’ Why do companies get an unhealthy sales culture? They’re pushing quota over quality, over long-term annual recurring revenue, and threatening those that aren’t ‘performing’ without understanding performance over time is powerful.”

“The most powerful conclusion one can take from the idea of ethical sales is to stand by key points: (1) Make thoughtful, careful research of a customer before even approaching them. (2) As Thorniley suggests, use ‘connected products, supported by predictive customer service [to anticipate] customer needs.’ (3) Think of the sales pipeline not as a one-stop process ending in a sale, but one that continually boosts customer happiness. (4) Don’t focus on closing; focus on making a sale that leaves the customer exhilarated and excited to have paid you.”

 

Click the image to read more from Hendricks.

CREDIT: Getty Images

 

Being Real on a Job Interview!

30 Mar

When going on job interviews, regardless of the level of the position, presenting yourself as authentic is essential. Over-inflating your accomplishments or presenting an untrue depiction of your true self often backfires.

Shane Parrish, writing for Quora, offers several valuable insights on this topic. How can a potential employer determine if an applicant is actually intelligent and not just a blowhard?

“I’ve been collecting little heuristics over the years. Here are a few that will get you thinking:

 
Now, take a a look at this short video clip from Inc. And click here to read more from Inc.

 

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