Tag Archives: tips

Are You Thinking of Using a Job Recruiter?

27 Feb

Job recruiters of all types can be very helpful to potential job applicants who are looking to move to the next level of their careers. BUT! Several factors should be kept in mind if you (as a job applicant) want to work with a recruiter.

“Whether they call themselves executive recruiters, headhunters, or executive search consultants, they’re the people who help companies fill open positions by finding the best candidate for the job. That means plenty of time spent prospecting for companies, searching for candidates, and staying glued to LinkedIn. We spoke to a few executive recruiters to learn their secrets—from how much they get paid to why they sometimes have a reputation for being less than polite.”

 

  1. “They work for the company, not the job seeker.”
  2. “They can earn big bucks for placing one candidate.”
  3. “They spend a lot of time with Excel. Recruiters will make and update lists of potential companies, job openings, and candidates Even if a company passes on one of their candidates, recruiters keep the names and contact information of good candidates in their spreadsheets for future opportunities.”
  4. “The word they hear most often is ‘no.’ On the candidate side, you are selling yourself as someone worthwhile to speak to—to open up and share intimate information about career dreams, compensation, and personal/family goals.”
  5. “They’re addicted to LinkedIn. Executive recruiters lurk in LinkedIn every day.”
  6. “Dealing with dejected or dishonest job seekers drains their energy.”
  7. “The burnout rate is high.”
  8. [Some] companies use them as a last resort.
  9. They’re spin doctors. Most recruiters are honest, respectful, and professional. But some  may be brusque when making cold calls or dealing with a candidate who isn’t a good match for an open job.”
  10. “They’re less competitive (with each other) than you might think.”
  11. “They accept the reality that the best candidate doesn’t always get the job. A mediocre candidate may beat out an outstanding candidate.”
  12. They love solving problems for their clients, working with people, and matching a job seeker to a company.”

 

Click the image to read a lot more!

Photo by iStock.

Photo by iStock.

 

Do You Have a Really Good Concept for a Startup Business?

23 Feb

Thinking of starting a new business? Can you properly and uniquely address the nine topics that are shown in the infographic below by StartBloggingOnline?

 

9 Ways to Validate Your Startup Ideas
 

Are You Vigilant in Protecting Your Reputation?

22 Feb

Whether we are reviewing our company’s reputation or our own personal self-brand, the results may be challenging because of the spread of fake news and the proliferation of negative social media comments. What we hope for perceptions of our reputation may not be in sync with the way others see us. And having a favorable reputation is critically important.

What can we do to have a well-respected reputation? Consider these suggestions from Sapir Segal, writing for Marketo:

Social media marketing requires a lot of patience and maintenance. Once you’ve established your social media presence and are generating engagement and measuring your ROI, the most important stage is to protect your hard work. Monitoring and protecting your social media presence from decline or extinction is just as pivotal as demonstrating it in the first place.”

“Controversial posts, account hacks, and inadvertent mistakes are all examples of threats that could harm your brand’s reputation. Luckily for marketers, many of these troubling factors are avoidable or correctable. To protect your social media reputation, you must have a careful eye for potential problems, a plan for handling crises, and a team you trust to write and manage the content. Here are three common mistakes that plague social media marketers: (1) unsupervised content publishing; (2) controversial content; and (3) account hacking.”

 

Click the image to read Segal’s solutions to these problems!

 

Which Elements of YOUR Emotional Intelligence Do YOU Need to Improve?

9 Feb

Emotional intelligence is a concept we should understand as marketers and in our own personal terms. According to Psychology Today, emotional intelligence is “the ability to identify and manage your own emotions and the emotions of others. It is generally said to include three skills: (1) Emotional awareness, including the ability to identify your own emotions and those of others. (2) The ability to harness emotions and apply them to tasks like thinking and problems solving. (3) The ability to manage emotions, including the ability to regulate your own emotions, and the ability to cheer up or calm down another person.”

Daniel Goleman and Richard E. Boyatzis, writing for Harvard Business Review, describe emotional intelligence in some depth:

“There are many models of emotional intelligence, each with its own set of abilities; they are often lumped together as ‘EQ’ in the popular vernacular. We prefer ‘EI,’ which we define as comprising four domains: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management. Nested within these domains are twelve EI competencies, learned and learnable capabilities that allow outstanding performance at work or as a leader . These include areas in which we are clearly strong: empathy, positive outlook, and self-control. But they also include crucial abilities such as achievement, influence, conflict management, teamwork and inspirational leadership. These skills require just as much engagement with emotions as the first set, and should be just as much a part of any aspiring leader’s development priorities.”

 

The twelve EI competencies are highlighted by More Than Sound. WHICH OF THEM ARE YOUR STRENGTHS AND WHICH OF THEM DO YOU NEED TO IMPROVE?

Self-Awareness (1) Emotional Self-Awareness:  “Emotionally self-aware leaders not only can be candid and authentic, they also can speak with conviction about their vision.”

Self-Management — (2) Emotional Self-Control: Leaders with self-control stay calm and clear-headed while under stress or during a crisis and maintain emotional balance.” (3) Achievement Orientation: “Leaders who have high standards for themselves and for others set measurable but challenging goals.” (4) Positive Outlook: Such a leader see others positively, and still expects the best of them (with a ‘glass half-full’ outlook).” (5) Adaptability: “This leader can juggle multiple demands, but remain focused on a group’s goals.”

Social Awareness (6) Empathy: “Such leaders listen attentively while understanding other’s perspectives, get along well with people of diverse backgrounds and cultures, and express their ideas in ways others understand.” (7) Organizational Awareness: “This leader can detect networking opportunities, read key power relationships, and understand the guiding values and unspoken rules that operate among people.”

Relationship Management — (8) Influence: “These leaders know how to appeal to others and how to build buy-in from key people.” (9) Coach and Mentor: “This leader has a genuine interest in helping others, and gives timely and constructive feedback to coworkers.” (10) Conflict Management: “They take time to understand different perspectives and work to find a common ground upon which everyone can agree.” (11) Inspirational Leadership:  “They articulate a shared mission in a way that inspires others to follow.” (12) Teamwork: “These leaders create an atmosphere of respect, helpfulness, and cooperation.”

 

 

Fortune’s 2017 Crystal Ball

8 Feb

Each year, Fortune magazine presents an interesting series of predictions for the coming year.

The 2017 “crystal ball” is based on these principles (and includes the use of IBM Watson 🙂 ):

“The election of Donald Trump to the presidency represents a seismic shift in American politics, an event with implications nearly impossible to predict. One casualty of the election, indeed, may be the science of prediction itself. For all their algorithmic gymnastics, pollsters and betting markets were utterly confounded by Trump’s win. Which is why it’s essential to have a prediction tool that relies as much on art (and whimsy) as it does on science. And this year, for some extra insight, we’ve even teamed up with artificial-intelligence powerhouse IBM Watson, which mined tens of millions of sources to help us spot hidden trends. Here, we offer our well-informed, intuitive take on the stories that will shape business—and much else—in the coming year.”

Fortune’s 2017 predictions are divided into several categories:

  • Techno-Futurism
  • Politics
  • Economy
  • The World
  • Trendsetters
  • More Companies Tie the Knot
  • Where Fortune Is Placing Its Bets
  • How We Did in 2016

 

Click the image to read the 2017 predictions.


 

Influencer Marketing: Coming of Age

1 Feb

One of our most popular emerging concepts is “influencer marketing.” What is it and how should it be used?

Consider these observations by Lee Oden (CEO of TopRank Marketing):

What does ‘influencer marketing’ mean to you? Are you thinking of celebrities posting product photos to Instagram? Or having a famous YouTuber run a contest for a meet and greet at an event? Why not send products to bloggers in the hopes that they’ll do a review and say nice things? Surely that’s not all enterprise marketers think of when it comes to the possible outcomes with influencer relationships.”

“The promise of brands collaborating or outright paying influential individuals to create content that lifts the brand’s credibility and reach to sell more products is something that companies of all sizes have been hot on – especially in the past 12 months. With a groundswell of interest, there are many divergent interpretations of what influencer marketing really means.”

“With so many different opinions, best practices, and even definitions, we set out with influencer marketing platform Traackr to bring clarity and future direction by conducting research into the practice for large, enterprise organizations. We also engaged my pal and respected futurist, author and analyst, Brian Solis of Altimeter Group to conduct an analysis of that research and write a report outlining what is working, what isn’t and future trends.”

 
Take a look at Influence 2.0: The Future of Influencer Marketing Research Report 2017, in-depth analysis and research on influencer marketing. Click on the image for the full report. [Note: a FREE signup is required.]

 


 

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