Tag Archives: tips

Attributes That Employers Study for Their Marketing Hires

25 Apr

What attributes do employers most value when considering candidates for marketing positions? Certainly, there are many possible answers to this question depending on the company, the specific job, and other criteria.

Nonetheless, here is an interesting delineation of factors that employers consider, as suggested by Geoffrey James for Inc.:

“Hiring great marketers can be challenging, though. Some marketers are great at appearing to be useful when they’re really accomplishing next to nothing. And, in my experience, some of the worst marketers have MBAs or years of experience. With that in mind, here’s what [employers should] look for in a marketing candidate.”

  1. A person who understands that marketing is a service. The first question to ask any candidate for a marketing job: ‘Define marketing.’ The answers will fall into three categories: (a) ‘Say whut?’ You’d be surprised how many marketers (including people with MBAs) don’t have a working definition of what they do, or plan to do, for a living. (b) ‘Marketing is strategic.’ Some marketers define marketing too broadly. Candidates who hold such bloated notions tend to squander their energy in too many directions. (c) ‘Marketing is a service.’ A top marketing candidate will tend to define marketing as a service that helps sales do its job more easily.”
  2. A person who likes being measured. Strong marketing groups (and the candidates you’d want to hire in them) are all about quantitative measurement. They’re familiar with marketing metrics (like conversion rates) and more than willing to have their work  judged on the basis of verifiable numbers.Weak marketing groups focus on activities, regardless of whether those activities generate sales opportunities or help salespeople close them. Such activities include brochures that nobody reads, fancy ads that generate zero sales leads, trade shows that are networking parties for the marketers, and more.
  3. A person who can write concisely.  We live in a constant state of information overload. Thus, the only marketing messages that are heard and remembered are short, vivid, and original. Unfortunately, some marketers are prone to use $5 words when 50¢ words would do the job better; biz-blab like ‘reach out,’ ‘circle back,’ and ‘pick your brain’; and clichés like ‘disruptive innovation,’ ‘industry-leading,’ and ‘state of the art.’ These sins can be deadly to marketers who must communicate with customers who are notoriously unwilling to wade through thick business prose.”
  4. A person who’s had some experience selling.  Great marketers have a deep respect for the job of selling. They realize that marketing is only meaningful if it helps salespeople do their job, which is much more important than any marketing task. You needn’t hold out for someone who’s sold for a living (although that would be ideal), but it is important that a marketing candidate know what it’s like to actually sell.”

Click the image to read more.

                   CREDIT: Getty Images

 

FREE Marketing Planning Tools!

17 Apr

Systematic, integrated, goal-oriented marketing plans are vital for long-run success. For example, see “Developing a Marketing Plan”.

Here are a number of marketing plan templates and sample marketing plans that provide good insights on how to better develop and enact marketing plans. Click on the links to access these templates and sample plans.

 
Here is the in-depth planning tool from Marketing Plan Now.

 

Ethical Selling: Not Necessarily an Oxymoron

4 Apr

Each year, Gallup conducts a survey on “Honesty/Ethics in Professions.” Here are the most recent results. As we can see, professionals in the health care professions are considered the most honest and ethical by Americans. On the other hand, car and insurance salespeople, advertising practitioners, and stockbrokers are rated quite low on these attributes. 
 

 

So what can these marketing professionals do to improve their standing among the public?

Consider these observations from Drew Hendricks, writing for Inc.:

“Sales itself is a fact of life; there’s something to sell to someone who wants to buy it; and salespeople are going to exist. Sales organizations need to ‘make a stand for ethical selling. Make sure it’s in your culture and communicate the importance and responsibility your salespeople and sales leadership have to represent the career of professional selling.’ Why do companies get an unhealthy sales culture? They’re pushing quota over quality, over long-term annual recurring revenue, and threatening those that aren’t ‘performing’ without understanding performance over time is powerful.”

“The most powerful conclusion one can take from the idea of ethical sales is to stand by key points: (1) Make thoughtful, careful research of a customer before even approaching them. (2) As Thorniley suggests, use ‘connected products, supported by predictive customer service [to anticipate] customer needs.’ (3) Think of the sales pipeline not as a one-stop process ending in a sale, but one that continually boosts customer happiness. (4) Don’t focus on closing; focus on making a sale that leaves the customer exhilarated and excited to have paid you.”

 

Click the image to read more from Hendricks.

CREDIT: Getty Images

 

Being Real on a Job Interview!

30 Mar

When going on job interviews, regardless of the level of the position, presenting yourself as authentic is essential. Over-inflating your accomplishments or presenting an untrue depiction of your true self often backfires.

Shane Parrish, writing for Quora, offers several valuable insights on this topic. How can a potential employer determine if an applicant is actually intelligent and not just a blowhard?

“I’ve been collecting little heuristics over the years. Here are a few that will get you thinking:

 
Now, take a a look at this short video clip from Inc. And click here to read more from Inc.

 

Be Careful in Making Promises to Customers

2 Mar

In the current highly competitive global marketplace, marketers face a difficult balancing act. On the one, they must promote their goods or services as superior to other firms’ offerings. On the other hand, if customers become unhappy because they buy something that does not meet their expectations, they may be lost to the overpromising firm forever. What we should do? Here’s one perspective from a company dealing with high-value clients.

As Joshua Hebert (CEO of Magellan Jets) writes for Fortune magazine:

“We know that everyone stumbles, and when that happens, the most important thing to do is minimize the damage and turn the mistakes into a positive. One of our most memorable setbacks was with a private travel customer who wanted us to help out when one of our competitors let her down. This was no small deal — one of the top celebrities in the world had a mechanical issue with her jet, and needed us to get her from London to New York overnight. What we did next wasn’t the best idea: We promised the world. Although we didn’t quite have everything lined up, we said we could make it happen on a moment’s notice. When we put the pieces together for the flight, we found the pilots would have too much time in the air that day. That would violated safety standards, so we had to tell them we could not complete the flight.”

“Here are a few things to keep in mind when big mistakes feel like the end of the world. Don’t delay bad news. If you don’t let people know about an issue, you’re hurting them and potentially creating an even bigger problem. Trust yourself When you make a mistake and say, ‘Here’s what I’m willing to do to fix it, and here’s what I’m not willing to do,’ it lets people know what’s most important to you. Being honest and only committing to submit high-quality work are examples of standards to stick by, even in tough situations. Institutionalize your lessons. It’s important to prevent mistakes from reoccurring. After the celebrity incident, we added a new flight support element to our team. Now, when “ASAP” trips are booked, we call customers every 15 minutes within a few hours of the flight for updates on their upcoming flight. Even if there is nothing to report, we touch base so there is no miscommunication.”

 

Click the image to learn about Magellan Jets.

 

How to Be a Better Public Speaker

28 Feb

For many people, public speaking can be tension-provoking, nerve racking, and more — especially for those who do not have much public speaking experience or who are presenting to large audiences.

So, take a deep breath, prepare well, be self-confident, and read these tips from Kevin Getch, writing for BusinessCollective (as presented by Tech.Co):

Be Humble — “Even if you present on a regular basis, don’t get over-confident. Even the pros slip once in awhile. Every moment you have on stage is a gift of people’s time and attention, so you should never turn it away by preparing inadequately.”

Have All Materials Ready Beforehand — “If you’re not able to commit your speech to memory, have a clear outline printed and easily accessible. Your cell phone is not a good substitute. I learned this when I forgot my lines and fumbled with my phone, trying to scroll to the right spot, but the pressure of 500+ eyes got the best of me. What came out of my mouth was a jumble of words. Now, I have hard copies of everything I may need. Print your material in a larger font with extra spacing to make the text easier to see and read. If you’re reading, make sure to look up at the audience often. It keeps people engaged.

Understand the Format of the Presentation — [From Evans on Marketing: Are you presenting on a stage or on the same level as the audience? Will you use a microphone? How much time do you have? Will there be a Q&A after the presentation? Are you presenting alone or with others? Are audience members experts or novices on your topic? Are PowerPoints and/or handouts expected? Etc.?]

Remember, Everybody Has Had Embarrassing Moments — “Rand Fishkin, a founder of Moz told me a story of his own. The greatest and most successful leaders in history have all experienced embarrassment and failure. In life and business, there will be times when you fail and times when you’re embarrassed. It’s going to happen. If there’s anything I’ve learned, it’s that you have to be comfortable with being uncomfortable in order to succeed.”

Practice Embarrassing Yourself — “While there may be consequences for poor judgment, taking chances often leads to a greater reward. As a leader, if you can’t accept your mistakes, you hold back your personal growth, your team’s growth and your company’s. It’s better to create an environment where people are encouraged to try new things and get out of their comfort zone, especially in low-pressure situations.

 
Click the image below to read more.
 

 

Are You Thinking of Using a Job Recruiter?

27 Feb

Job recruiters of all types can be very helpful to potential job applicants who are looking to move to the next level of their careers. BUT! Several factors should be kept in mind if you (as a job applicant) want to work with a recruiter.

“Whether they call themselves executive recruiters, headhunters, or executive search consultants, they’re the people who help companies fill open positions by finding the best candidate for the job. That means plenty of time spent prospecting for companies, searching for candidates, and staying glued to LinkedIn. We spoke to a few executive recruiters to learn their secrets—from how much they get paid to why they sometimes have a reputation for being less than polite.”

 

  1. “They work for the company, not the job seeker.”
  2. “They can earn big bucks for placing one candidate.”
  3. “They spend a lot of time with Excel. Recruiters will make and update lists of potential companies, job openings, and candidates Even if a company passes on one of their candidates, recruiters keep the names and contact information of good candidates in their spreadsheets for future opportunities.”
  4. “The word they hear most often is ‘no.’ On the candidate side, you are selling yourself as someone worthwhile to speak to—to open up and share intimate information about career dreams, compensation, and personal/family goals.”
  5. “They’re addicted to LinkedIn. Executive recruiters lurk in LinkedIn every day.”
  6. “Dealing with dejected or dishonest job seekers drains their energy.”
  7. “The burnout rate is high.”
  8. [Some] companies use them as a last resort.
  9. They’re spin doctors. Most recruiters are honest, respectful, and professional. But some  may be brusque when making cold calls or dealing with a candidate who isn’t a good match for an open job.”
  10. “They’re less competitive (with each other) than you might think.”
  11. “They accept the reality that the best candidate doesn’t always get the job. A mediocre candidate may beat out an outstanding candidate.”
  12. They love solving problems for their clients, working with people, and matching a job seeker to a company.”

 

Click the image to read a lot more!

Photo by iStock.

Photo by iStock.

 

%d bloggers like this: