Tag Archives: job qualifications

The Popularity of Marketing Internships: Be Prepared and Don’t Wait!

6 Feb

Internships provide great opportunities for real-world experiences, a great addition to a resume, and contacts for future employment. DID YOU KNOW that marketing-related internships are among the most popular by companies? This augurs well for a career in marketing. 🙂

First, consider this:  Research by Burning Glass Technologies shows that:

“More than ever there is a narrow season for internship recruitment. That season peaks in March – ahead of when many students begin to think about summer opportunities. And employers expect interns to arrive already equipped with knowledge of critical skills in software and other areas that enable them to be productive on the first day. If you wait until the end of the semester to get an internship, you have waited too long. Recruiting for internships begins in January and peaks in March. Then demand begins to taper off sharply. There is a small second bump in September for term-time internships as the school year begins.” The concentration of postings in March has increased steadily over the past five years. In March 2016, there were 29,360 internships posted, an 11% increase over the 2011-2015 average, and a 2% increase over the 28,796 postings in March 2015.

“The total number of internships posted in 2016 was 216,333.”


Of the top 20 U.S. internship fields, FIVE of the most popular six are marketing-related. As reported by the New York Times, Burning Glass found the following internship popularity in its research [Marketing-related is denoted by color.]:

1. BUSINESS OPERATIONS (Internship postings from September 2015 to October 2016: 58,949) — Most in-demand skills: Project management, business administration, scheduling, customer service, economics

2. MARKETING (Internship postings from September 2015 to October 2016: 35,498) — Most in-demand skills: Social media, marketing, Adobe Photoshop, Facebook, market research

4. SALES AND BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT (Internship postings from September 2015 to October 2016: 28,227) — Most in-demand skills: Sales, business development, marketing, customer service, project management

5. MEDIA, COMMUNICATIONS, PUBLIC RELATIONS (Internship postings from September 2015 to October 2016: 28,140) — Most in-demand skills: Social media, journalism, Adobe Photoshop, marketing, technical writing and editing

6. DATA ANALYTICS (Internship postings from September 2015 to October 2016: 26,438) — Most in-demand skills: Data analysis, data collection, market research, mathematics, project management


Click the image to read Burning Glass Technologies full report.


Don’ts for Businesses Using Social Media

30 Jan

In this new era of fake news, alternative truth, and inflammatory messages on social media, it is a good time for us to appraise (or reappraise) our own use of social media. Are we doing the best we can to avoid careless mistakes or inflammatory language?

Recently, Annie Pilon described “20 Taboo Topics to Stay Away from on Your Company’s Social Media Channels” for Small Business Trends. Here are some of her observations. PLEASE keep them in mind when utilizing social media and reacting to comments by others:

“If you use social media to promote your business online, you’ve probably put a lot of thought into what types of posts to share. But sometimes it can be just as important to consider what NOT to post on social media.”

             “Making fun of specific groups of people can go too far.

Even the occasional complaint about customers can be enough to damage your brand.

Avoid complaining about your employees online.

Customers want to know that you have a team that they can trust.

Nonconstructive criticism about public figures can seem petty to your social media followers.

You don’t want to be too intrusive when asking questions of your followers.

Be careful not to share anything that’s not true, as it can make your business look bad and lead to your followers being misinformed.

Healthy competition can be good for a business, even on social media. But there’s a big difference between a friendly back-and-forth and trash-talking.

Social media also isn’t the place to share sensitive or confidential information about customers.

Don’t share with followers every time you’re having a bad day or just feeling ‘blah’ about your business.

Posting anything illegal, whether it’s drug use or even just speeding, is a very bad idea.

Stay away from sharing any content that could be considered controversial.

It’s also best not to post anything that’s irrelevant to your audience.”


Click the image to learn more from Pilon.


Great Video Brand Examples on Instagram

21 Sep

Instagram now has 500 million active users, and it is rapid pulling away from Twitter (whose user base has been rather stagnant). Instagram’s popularity has not gone unnoticed by brand marketers who have been posting pictures and videos in great numbers.

Recently, HubSpot wrote about some of the best video examples of brands using Instagram. According to  Lindsay Kolowich:

Remember when Instagram first started allowing users to post videos back in 2013? The first Instagram videos had to be recorded on your phone and could only be up to 15 seconds long. Those were the days that people compared Instagram video to its Twitter-owned counterpart, Vine. Instagram’s come a long way since then, and it’s blown Vine out of the water. Like most of the other popular social networks, the folks at Instagram have made changes to its platform that make it easier for people to post and share videos.”

“In late March 2016, Instagram announced it would start rolling out the ability for Instagram users to upload 60-second videos. For iOS users, it added that users would soon be able to make videos out of multiple clips from their camera rolls. Thanks to these changes, marketers can use the Instagram app to relate with their fans and customers, to communicate their business’ personalities and brand stories, and to express artistic creativity.”

Here are a few of the 17 brands cited by HubSpot. Click on their names to access their Instagram pages. The posts with video have a video camera in the upper right corner:


Getting Off a Bad Career Path

11 Jun

We all aspire to great careers — with jobs that we find fulfilling, that have cooperative workmates, that have bosses who respect us and our abilities, that have the potential for upward mobility, and that compensate us fairly.

So, happens when our career goals are not being fulfilled?

Here are some observations from By J.T. O’Donnell, Founder and CEO, CareerHMO.com — writing for Inc.:

Step 1: Get clear on your pivot. You need to choose a new career direction based on the facts. What problems do you want to solve? What skills do you want to leverage? How do you want to provide value to an employer?  The more specific you can be about your new career direction, the easier it will be to connect the dots and get a new job doing what you want.” [Click the preceding link to access a free quiz.]

Step 2: Create an ‘interview bucket list.’ A targeted, proactive job search always produces better results. When you identify the companies you would most like to work for, you can build a job search plan that lets you work smarter.” [Click the preceding link to access interview bucket list tips.]

Step 3: Make new career friends. It still holds true that 80 percent of all jobs are obtained via referral. If you are changing careers, you need to meet people who are working for the companies on your interview bucket list.”

Step 4: Seek a ‘lily pad’ job. Getting a job at a company that has the kind of career opportunities you want to move into might start with you doing something for them that leverages the skills you gained in the career you’re trying to get out of. Once you’ve got your foot in the door, you can use your professional savvy to impress the employer into giving you a shot at doing what you really want to do.”

Click the image to read tips from O’Donnell regarding each of the above steps.

CREDIT: Getty Images


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