Tag Archives: career

Being Real on a Job Interview!

30 Mar

When going on job interviews, regardless of the level of the position, presenting yourself as authentic is essential. Over-inflating your accomplishments or presenting an untrue depiction of your true self often backfires.

Shane Parrish, writing for Quora, offers several valuable insights on this topic. How can a potential employer determine if an applicant is actually intelligent and not just a blowhard?

“I’ve been collecting little heuristics over the years. Here are a few that will get you thinking:

 
Now, take a a look at this short video clip from Inc. And click here to read more from Inc.

 

The Best Firms If You Want to Work in Tech

8 Mar

If you want to work for a technology company, TechRepublic has ranked these as the best employers [Click the company names to visit their jobs’ Web sites.]:

  1. Facebook — “Never pay for lunch (or dry cleaning) again when you start your career at Facebook. In addition to health insurance, employees are given benefits such as $700 a year for fitness and $250 annually for running Facebook ads.”
  2. Google — “This pet-friendly workplace is designed so no employee is ever more than 150 feet food.  massages are subsidized, transportation is sustainable, and game rooms are pretty much everywhere. And every employee is encouraged to spend 20 percent of time working on a personal passion project.”
  3. World Wide Technology –“The CEO’s Glassdoor approval rating is 100 percent. About 75 percent of employees use the firm’s telecommuting option. And World Wide Technology has an on-site clinic where employees and family members can see doctors and stay healthy.”
  4. FAST Enterprises — “Its Annual General Meeting (AGM) is an all-expense paid, annual trip for employees and their families where they are recognized for accomplishments. These workers are known as FASTies.”
  5. LinkedIn — “Its speaker series has hosted the likes of President Obama. The cafe has kombucha on tap, and there’s a rock wall right there in the office.”

 
Click the image for a TechRepublic slideshow of TWENTY top technology employers.

Courtesy of Apple


 

Looking for Marketing Salary Information?

1 Mar

We’ve talked before about salary information sites such as PayScale. Today, we’re highlighting another valuable salary guide — Good Calculators.

At  the salary calculator section of the site, you can learn salaries by state, occupation, and career, and all occupations by region.

Here are several marketing career salary examples from Good Calculators. [PLEASE NOTE: In reviewing these numbers, please keep in mind that they refer to specific careers. In each state, all of the careers illustrated below are available!]

  • Arizona, management occupations, food service managers — average annual salary = $55,010; average hourly salary = $26.45; no. of employees: 3,360
  • California, management occupations, marketing managers — average annual salary = $161,640; average hourly salary = $77.71; no. of employees: 32,800
  • Florida, management occupations, lodging managers — average annual salary = $64,980; average hourly salary = $31.24; no. of employees: 3,430
  • Illinois, management occupations, public relations and fundraising managers — average annual salary = $107,060; average hourly salary = $51.47; no. of employees: 3,210
  • Maryland, sales and related occupations, advertising sales agents — average annual salary = $61,760; average hourly salary = $29.69; no. of employees: 1,260
  • New York, management occupations, marketing managers — average annual salary = $186,940; average hourly salary = $89.88; no. of employees: 14,860
  • North Carolina, sales and related occupations, real-estate brokers — average annual salary = $60,010; average hourly salary = $28.85; no. of employees: 6,020
  • Ohio, management occupations, sales managers — average annual salary = $124,960; average hourly salary = $60.08; no. of employees: 12,140
  • Pennsylvania, management occupations, purchasing managers — average annual salary = $117,960; average hourly salary = $56.71; no. of employees: 1,820
  • South Carolina, sales and related occupations, securities/financial services brokers — average annual salary = $92,940; average hourly salary = $44.68; no. of employees: 1,410
  • Texas, sales and related occupations, first-line supervisors of non-retail sales workers — average annual salary = $84,730; average hourly salary = $40.74; no. of employees: 25,630

 
To learn A LOT MORE about salary possibilities by state, occupation, and career, click the image.


 

Are You Thinking of Using a Job Recruiter?

27 Feb

Job recruiters of all types can be very helpful to potential job applicants who are looking to move to the next level of their careers. BUT! Several factors should be kept in mind if you (as a job applicant) want to work with a recruiter.

“Whether they call themselves executive recruiters, headhunters, or executive search consultants, they’re the people who help companies fill open positions by finding the best candidate for the job. That means plenty of time spent prospecting for companies, searching for candidates, and staying glued to LinkedIn. We spoke to a few executive recruiters to learn their secrets—from how much they get paid to why they sometimes have a reputation for being less than polite.”

 

  1. “They work for the company, not the job seeker.”
  2. “They can earn big bucks for placing one candidate.”
  3. “They spend a lot of time with Excel. Recruiters will make and update lists of potential companies, job openings, and candidates Even if a company passes on one of their candidates, recruiters keep the names and contact information of good candidates in their spreadsheets for future opportunities.”
  4. “The word they hear most often is ‘no.’ On the candidate side, you are selling yourself as someone worthwhile to speak to—to open up and share intimate information about career dreams, compensation, and personal/family goals.”
  5. “They’re addicted to LinkedIn. Executive recruiters lurk in LinkedIn every day.”
  6. “Dealing with dejected or dishonest job seekers drains their energy.”
  7. “The burnout rate is high.”
  8. [Some] companies use them as a last resort.
  9. They’re spin doctors. Most recruiters are honest, respectful, and professional. But some  may be brusque when making cold calls or dealing with a candidate who isn’t a good match for an open job.”
  10. “They’re less competitive (with each other) than you might think.”
  11. “They accept the reality that the best candidate doesn’t always get the job. A mediocre candidate may beat out an outstanding candidate.”
  12. They love solving problems for their clients, working with people, and matching a job seeker to a company.”

 

Click the image to read a lot more!

Photo by iStock.

Photo by iStock.

 

Leadership Infographic (2): Are You Using the Best Approach for YOU?

21 Feb

As we posted yesterday, there are various leadership styles from which to select. Today, we ask: What leadership style is best for you? This infographic is also from Headway Capital.
 

Click on the image for a larger view.

 
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Leadership Infographic (1): What Type of Leader Are You?

20 Feb

What is your leadership style? Are you happy with it? Are there areas you need to work on to improve?

As Barbara Davidson notes for Headway Capital:

“Leadership can be a rewarding experience, but there are many different ways to lead your team to success. Do you know which is best for you? Could you be a pace-setting leader, dishing out hard deadlines to motivate fast results? Or maybe you’re a coach, working closely with your star players to help them achieve top results. Whatever your management style, the important thing is to know what your strengths are and which skills need to develop. Our new infographic offers a great flowchart to help you identify what type of leader you are.”

 

Click on the image for a larger view.

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Which Elements of YOUR Emotional Intelligence Do YOU Need to Improve?

9 Feb

Emotional intelligence is a concept we should understand as marketers and in our own personal terms. According to Psychology Today, emotional intelligence is “the ability to identify and manage your own emotions and the emotions of others. It is generally said to include three skills: (1) Emotional awareness, including the ability to identify your own emotions and those of others. (2) The ability to harness emotions and apply them to tasks like thinking and problems solving. (3) The ability to manage emotions, including the ability to regulate your own emotions, and the ability to cheer up or calm down another person.”

Daniel Goleman and Richard E. Boyatzis, writing for Harvard Business Review, describe emotional intelligence in some depth:

“There are many models of emotional intelligence, each with its own set of abilities; they are often lumped together as ‘EQ’ in the popular vernacular. We prefer ‘EI,’ which we define as comprising four domains: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, and relationship management. Nested within these domains are twelve EI competencies, learned and learnable capabilities that allow outstanding performance at work or as a leader . These include areas in which we are clearly strong: empathy, positive outlook, and self-control. But they also include crucial abilities such as achievement, influence, conflict management, teamwork and inspirational leadership. These skills require just as much engagement with emotions as the first set, and should be just as much a part of any aspiring leader’s development priorities.”

 

The twelve EI competencies are highlighted by More Than Sound. WHICH OF THEM ARE YOUR STRENGTHS AND WHICH OF THEM DO YOU NEED TO IMPROVE?

Self-Awareness (1) Emotional Self-Awareness:  “Emotionally self-aware leaders not only can be candid and authentic, they also can speak with conviction about their vision.”

Self-Management — (2) Emotional Self-Control: Leaders with self-control stay calm and clear-headed while under stress or during a crisis and maintain emotional balance.” (3) Achievement Orientation: “Leaders who have high standards for themselves and for others set measurable but challenging goals.” (4) Positive Outlook: Such a leader see others positively, and still expects the best of them (with a ‘glass half-full’ outlook).” (5) Adaptability: “This leader can juggle multiple demands, but remain focused on a group’s goals.”

Social Awareness (6) Empathy: “Such leaders listen attentively while understanding other’s perspectives, get along well with people of diverse backgrounds and cultures, and express their ideas in ways others understand.” (7) Organizational Awareness: “This leader can detect networking opportunities, read key power relationships, and understand the guiding values and unspoken rules that operate among people.”

Relationship Management — (8) Influence: “These leaders know how to appeal to others and how to build buy-in from key people.” (9) Coach and Mentor: “This leader has a genuine interest in helping others, and gives timely and constructive feedback to coworkers.” (10) Conflict Management: “They take time to understand different perspectives and work to find a common ground upon which everyone can agree.” (11) Inspirational Leadership:  “They articulate a shared mission in a way that inspires others to follow.” (12) Teamwork: “These leaders create an atmosphere of respect, helpfulness, and cooperation.”

 

 

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