Tag Archives: 2017

Best Business Books to Read in 2018

9 Jan

As we head into the new year, what are the best business books to read in 2018 ? With this in mind, we present links to many “best” business book lists. So, click a link below. And start reading a business book that interests you. 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

For comparison, take a look at Great Books to Read in 2017.

 

Best Business Books to Read in 2018

To access one or more of the “best’ links, click below. [Note: They appear in alphabetical order.]

 

Best Business Books of All Time

In addition to the lists recommending recent business books, there are lists citing the best business books of all time. Here are three such lists:

12 Best Business Books of All Time. From USA Today. This list is divided by category. Self-Improvement. Leadership and Management. Strategy. Marketing. Entrepreneurship. And General Business. Its number one for Marketing? Click the image for the full list of 12.

Best Business Books to Read in 2018

15 Best Business Books of All Time. From Business Insider. Its number one? Click the image for the full list of 15.

Best Business Books to Read in 2018

42 Best Business Books of All Time. From Book Authority. Based on Recommendations by Jeff Bezos, Warren Buffett, Eric Schmidt, Steve Jobs and 57 other experts. Its number one? Click the image for the full list of 42.

Best Business Books to Read in 2018
 

Professions Perceived as Most Ethical – and Most Unethical

4 Jan

Today, we discuss the professions perceived as most ethical – and most unethical. And this builds on our coverage of ethical firms and marketing practices:

For most of us, the leading study of ethics in the professions is from Gallup. Let’s look at its 2017 U.S. poll results.

 

U.S. Professions Perceived as Most Ethical – and Most Unethical

For several years, Gallup has polled the American public to learn how the ethics of 22 different professions are perceived.

Before reading further: Which professions do YOU view as the most ethical? And as the most unethical? In alphabetical order, here are the 22 professions:

(1) Advertising practitioners. (2) Auto mechanics. (3) Bankers. (4) Business executives. (5) Car salespeople. (6) Clergy. (7) Day care providers. (8) Grade school teachers. (9) Judges. (10) Lawyers. (11) Lobbyists. (12) Local officeholders. (13) Medical doctors. (14) Members of Congress. (15) Military officers. (16) Newspaper reporters. (17) Nurses. (18) Nursing home operators. (19) Pharmacists. (20) Police officers. (21) State officeholders. (22) TV reporters.

After doing your ranking, review Gallup’s December 2017 findings. And study this chart.

Professions Perceived as Most Ethical - and Most Unethical

As Gallup reports:

“For the 16th consecutive year, Americans’ ratings of the honesty and ethics of 22 occupations finds nurses at the top. And more than eight in 10 (82%) Americans describe nurses’ ethics as ‘very high’ or ‘high.’ In contrast, about six in 10 Americans rate members of Congress (60%) and lobbyists (58%) as ‘very low’ or ‘low’.”

“In sum, a majority of Americans rate six groups as ‘high’ or ‘very high’ for honesty and ethics. Besides nurses, that list includes military officers, grade school teachers, medical doctors, police officers, and pharmacists. Although the rating of pharmacists remains high, it fell 5 points from 2016. And this may reflect the opioid crisis.”

In 2017, “only members of Congress and lobbyists get majority negative ratings. Yet, the other 14 occupations rate ‘average’. Lawyers, local officeholders, bankers, and auto mechanics have majority ‘average’ marks. Also, the public is divided between positive and average rankings for both judges and clergy. And these two groups require honesty and ethical standards.”

 

2017 American Personal Consumption Spending

29 Dec

Due to a strong economy, this year has seen an uptick in consumer spending. So how good a shopping year has it been? Let’s look at 2017 American personal consumption spending.

 

Good Times: 2017 American Personal Consumption Spending

Before noting total-year spending, consider these posts:

Now, on to some interesting 2017 U.S. spending data.

According to 24/7 Wall St.:

“American consumers have spent $130.6 trillion so far in 2017. That is a 2.7% increase over 2016. And personal spending by U.S. consumers accounts for two-thirds of all spending in the United States. Thus, it is the primary driver of economic growth. Spending on luxury goods such as yachts and private planes has risen. So has spending on necessary expenses such as housing, food, and health care. Additionally, due to better technology more Americans are able to afford televisions, internet access, and other consumer electronics. Changes in technology have also led some Americans to abandon certain outdated products and services altogether.”

“To determine what Americans spent in 2017, we analyzed real personal consumption expenditures from January to November 2017 from the Bureau of Economic Analysis [BEA]. We chose 50 consumer categories that best represent what Americans spent in 2017. Money continues to circulate over the course of the year once it is spent. Thus, while personal consumption is a good reflection of how Americans spend their money, it far outweighs the total value of goods and services in the economy.”

Click the 24/7 Wall St. logo to read its fully story. Then, check out the top five spending categories below the logo.

2017 American Personal Consumption Spending -- Top 50 Categories
 

Top Five Categories: 2017 American Personal Consumption Spending

Here are 24/7 Wall St.’s top five spending categories based on BEA data.

  1. Occupied housing payments. 2017 spending: $19.39 trillion. Share of total expenditure: 14.85%. 1-year change: +1.24%. 10-year change: +14.01%.
  2. Groceries. 2017 spending: $7.89 trillion. Share of total expenditure: 6.04%. 1-year change: +2.49%. 10-year change: +5.14%.
  3. Physician and dental visits. 2017 spending: $6.68 trillion. Share of total expenditure: 5.12%. 1-year change: +4.40%. 10-year change: +25.80%.
  4. Restaurants and bars. 2017 spending: $5.61 trillion. Share of total expenditure: 4.30%. 1-year change: +0.84%. 10-year change: +15.65%.
  5. Clothing and footwear. 2017 spending: $4.24 trillion. Share of total expenditure: 3.25%. 1-year change: +2.01%. 10-year change: +19.08%.

 

Certain U.S. Travelers Like Loyalty Programs — And Use Them

30 Nov

As we know, there are various types of loyalty programs. And these include programs tied to banks, retailers, gas stations, etc. Among the promoted programs? Travel-related programs. They offer loyal customers free rooms, airline travel, upgrades, and more. This post focuses on travel programs. Certain U.S. travelers like loyalty programs — and use them.

 

Background

Often, firms go to great lengths to attract loyal shoppers. And with the competition today, that is not easy. In some instances, shoppers dislike loyalty programs. Period. In other cases, they use the programs infrequently. So, firms need to get their acts together. The goal: active customer loyalty.

Consider these posts:

Click the infographic.

As we know, there are various types of loyalty programs. Among the most popular programs? Travel-related offerings. They offer loyal customers free rooms, airline travel, upgrades, and more. This post covers travel programs. Certain U.S. travelers like loyalty programs -- and use them.

 

Certain U.S. Travelers Like Loyalty Programs

Travel loyalty programs offer tangible benefits. To wit, earn specified points. And receive a reward. Yet, travel programs are NOT in the top tier of loyalty programs. Surprising? Maybe. Maybe Not.

eMarketer reports that:

“Travel loyalty programs are popular with travelers. But they don’t have the same following among consumers overall. And this applies to young people. A survey of Internet users in North America from CrowdTwist found retail programs had the highest adoption among those 18 to 37. Meanwhile, travel and hospitality programs were in the middle.”

Thus, the bottom-line question: Travel-related firms have to work to increase use of their loyalty programs. So, what could they do to attract young adults?

Certain U.S. Travelers Like Loyalty Programs. But they rate low.

On the plus side, travelers like loyalty programs. In particular, they use hotel and airline loyalty programs. And business travelers have higher engagement than leisure travelers.

For further information, we again turn to eMarketer:

New data from Phocuswright and Acxiom found that 4 in 5 U.S. travelers were members of a travel-related loyalty program. Naturally, the point of such programs is to help drive revenues and add to the bottom line. eMarketer estimates that digital travel sales in the U.S. will total $189.62 billion this year. And that figure will grow to $219.69 billion by 2021.”

“The Phocuswright and Acxiom survey found that business travelers were more committed to loyalty programs than leisure travelers. This was across pretty much every segment of the travel market. The obvious reason:  They are apt to travel more frequently. For instance, 62% of business travelers had signed up for a hotel’s loyalty plan, compared with 54% of leisure travelers.”

Certain U.S. Travelers Like Loyalty Programs -- And Use Them, B2B vs. B2C.

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