Tag Archives: joel evans

Are You Always “On”? Living in a Connected World: Segment 3

12 Jul

We live in a digitally connected world, where many of us are regularly “on.” However, some firms are still fighting back against this phenomenon. Consider this example (from Jane E. Brody, writing for the NY Times):

“Hurray for the HotBlack Coffee cafe in Toronto for declining to offer Wi-Fi to its customers. It’s HotBlack’s reason for the electronic blackout that is cause for praise. As its president, Jimson Bienenstock, explained, his aim is to get customers to talk with one another instead of being buried in their portable devices. “It’s about creating a social vibe. We’re a vehicle for human interaction, otherwise it’s just a commodity.”

 
Recently, Zarb School of Business Distinguished Professor Joel Evans of Hofstra University did an extended radio interview with Suzanne B. Phillips, Psy.D. on living in a connected world and the growing phenomenon of always being “on.” Connectivity involves using digital devices to interact with the outside world, including smartphones, smart TVs, wearable devices, GPS, computers, tablets, home security systems, and more. This interview is divided into three segments for YouTube. Click here to see Segment 1 and click here to Segment 2.
 

Segment 3 highlights these topics:

• Connectivity by social media platform
• Demographics of followers by social media platform
• Growth of mobile connectivity
• Many benefits of connectivity
• Many downsides of connectivity
• Recommendations
• Always be smart and protect yourself
• Think before posting
 
 

 

Prof. Joel Evans’ YouTube Channel

11 Jul
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Source: Prof. Joel Evans’ YouTube Channel
 

Are You Always “On”? Living in a Connected World: Segment 2

11 Jul

We live in a digitally connected world, where many of us are regularly “on.” According to Annie Kjellstrom:

“Until recently, we connected with one another in person. We planned activities around what we liked to do together, not the best status update. We made photo albums (real ones) as a tribute to good times and we only shared important updates about our lives with people who were a part of them. Being connected meant sharing ourselves with those closest to us — without a need to document, broadcast, or archive relationships.”

“Today, being ‘connected’ is a much more complicated concept. In some cases, digital connections are even required to validate offline relationships — after all, you’re not really dating unless it’s ‘Facebook official.’”

 

Recently, Zarb School of Business Distinguished Professor Joel Evans of Hofstra University did an extended radio interview with Suzanne B. Phillips, Psy.D. on living in a connected world and the growing phenomenon of always being “on.” Connectivity involves using digital devices to interact with the outside world, including smartphones, smart TVs, wearable devices, GPS, computers, tablets, home security systems, and more. This interview is divided into three segments for YouTube. Click here to see Segment 1.

 

Segment 2 highlights these topics:

• • Smartphone’s impact on quality of work – distractions
• Myth of multitasking
• Challenges of teaching in a smartphone-connected world
• Societal acceptance of always being on – no code of conduct and few limits on use
• Explosion of connected devices and how they can be used (“smart” devices)
• 13 billion connected devices for people as of 2020
• Currently, 3.6 connected devices per person
• Growth of social media platforms
• [U.S.] Lifetime, more than 5 full years per person spent on social media – more than time on eating or personal interactions
• Social media by gender

 

 

Are You Always “On”? Living in a Connected World: Segment 1

10 Jul

We live in a digitally connected world, where many of us are regularly “on.” According to a study by A.T. Kearney of 10,000 ‘connected consumers’ (people who say they connect to the Internet at least once a week):

“Our findings are fascinating and at times counterintuitive. Here’s the quick view: Continuous connectivity. More than half of survey respondents say that they are connected to the Internet nearly every waking hour.Four motivations for connectivity. People go online because it meets four basic, universal needs: interpersonal connection, self-expression, exploration, and convenience. The power of social media. Social networks are where connected consumers spend the most time online. They are effective in gaining brand interest and purchases among younger consumers. Yet, number of users on a social network is not necessarily an indication of engagement or purchases. The convergence of physical and online stores. While most purchases today are still made in store, more than half of survey respondents say they prefer shopping online and the online experience. Connectivity does not mean consumers do everything online; but being connected offers access, speed, and convenience.”

 

Recently, Zarb School of Business Distinguished Professor Joel Evans of Hofstra University did an extended radio interview with Suzanne B. Phillips, Psy.D. on living in a connected world and the growing phenomenon of always being “on.” Connectivity involves using digital devices to interact with the outside world, including smartphones, smart TVs, wearable devices, GPS, computers, tablets, home security systems, and more. This interview is divided into three segments for YouTube.
 

Segment 1 highlights these topics:

• Evolution of connectivity – today, it is much more high-tech and less personal
• How connected people are – from waking to going to sleep
• Reliance on the smartphone to access the Internet and social media
• Many of the motivations behind digital connectivity
• Time spent with and uses of digital connectivity
• Passive versus interactive connectivity
• Global perspective
• Differences by age
• Personal connectivity at work

 

 

FREE: 2017 Edition of Careers in Business

11 Apr

Learn about the many opportunities and challenges facing those interested in a career in business. The latest data are included. Lots of data!!
 

Outline of Topics:
  • General Hints
  • Background Data By Occupation
  • Long-term Trends
  • Hot Long-term Business Career Opportunities
  • Bureau Of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook
  • LinkedIn
  • “Find A Job” Resources

 

 

Don’ts for Businesses Using Social Media

30 Jan

In this new era of fake news, alternative truth, and inflammatory messages on social media, it is a good time for us to appraise (or reappraise) our own use of social media. Are we doing the best we can to avoid careless mistakes or inflammatory language?

Recently, Annie Pilon described “20 Taboo Topics to Stay Away from on Your Company’s Social Media Channels” for Small Business Trends. Here are some of her observations. PLEASE keep them in mind when utilizing social media and reacting to comments by others:

“If you use social media to promote your business online, you’ve probably put a lot of thought into what types of posts to share. But sometimes it can be just as important to consider what NOT to post on social media.”

             “Making fun of specific groups of people can go too far.

Even the occasional complaint about customers can be enough to damage your brand.

Avoid complaining about your employees online.

Customers want to know that you have a team that they can trust.

Nonconstructive criticism about public figures can seem petty to your social media followers.

You don’t want to be too intrusive when asking questions of your followers.

Be careful not to share anything that’s not true, as it can make your business look bad and lead to your followers being misinformed.

Healthy competition can be good for a business, even on social media. But there’s a big difference between a friendly back-and-forth and trash-talking.

Social media also isn’t the place to share sensitive or confidential information about customers.

Don’t share with followers every time you’re having a bad day or just feeling ‘blah’ about your business.

Posting anything illegal, whether it’s drug use or even just speeding, is a very bad idea.

Stay away from sharing any content that could be considered controversial.

It’s also best not to post anything that’s irrelevant to your audience.”

 

Click the image to learn more from Pilon.


 

Self-Branding for Professional Success: An In-Depth Discussion

10 Jan

Want to learn more about branding and its features—including the evolution of branding and brand positioning? Want to learn more about how to create and nurture your own self-brand to enhance your professional growth opportunities? If you answer yes to either question, then this article is “must reading.”

The first part of the article (pages 1-10) covers the evolution of branding concepts, brand positioning, brand equity, the role of communications (including new media), and corporate branding.

The second part of the article (starting on the bottom of page 10) focuses on such aspects of self-branding as these: the factors impacting one’s professional self-brand, steps in self-branding, personal branding SWOT analysis, a career ladder approach to self-branding, self-brand management and re-invention, and creating and sustaining an online self-brand.

To enhance the discussion, there are several practical and colorful figures that illustrate the keys to superior professional self-branding.

[Click the IN logo at the bottom of the slideshow to access and download a PDF version of the paper.]

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