Tag Archives: text message

AOL Instant Messenger RIP

9 Oct

After 20 years on the market, AOL will discontinue AOL Instant Messenger (AIM) as of December 15, 2017. To that, we  say, AOL Instant Messenger RIP. Rest in Peace.

AOL Instant Messenger RIP. After 20 years, AIM is being shut down on December 15, 2017. There is too much newer technology for it to compete successfully.

Why is AIM being eliminated? One big reason is the growth of chat and other messaging services. As a result, AIM is obsolete. Today, many companies also offer online chat for shoppers.  For example, see this post. Using Live Chat Software to Enhance the Online Experience.

 

The Hey Day of AIM

In looking back at 1997, keep these factors in mind. The Internet was in its infancy. E-mail was emerging. There was no chat software. People connected with modems, not through broadband. The opportunity for the new service of “instant messaging” was enormous. Enter AIM.

As Josh Constine reports for TechCrunch:

“Initially, the chat experience was built into AOL desktop. AIM launched as a standalone app in 1997. Its iconic Away Messages were the ancestor to modern tweets and status updates. It battled for supremacy with ICQ and messengers from Yahoo and Microsoft MSN.”

And these are Scott Neuman’s observations for NPR:

“For many of us, AIM conjures up memories of dial-up modems, the sound of a ‘handshake’, and the phrase ‘You’ve Got Mail.’ ‘AIM tapped into new digital technologies and ignited a cultural shift, but the way in which we communicate with each other has profoundly changed,’ says Michael Albers, of  Oath Inc., a subsidiary of Verizon that bought AOL.”

At its peak in 2001, AIM attracted 100 million subscribers. In 2017 terms, that number may seem small. Think Facebook. But in 2001, this figure was huge. And as late as 2006, AIM accounted for a 52 percent market share for instant messaging market in the United States.

Nostalgic? Watch this YouTube video.

 

 

AOL Instant Messenger RIP

In sum, Neuman notes:

“Eventually text messaging, Google’s GChat, and Facebook took over. At the same time, AIM never fully figured out the shift to mobile. That led to AOL’s fall from grace, going from being valued at $224 billion in today’s money to $4.4 billion when sold to Verizon in 2015. For context on the business AOL let slip away, WhatsApp sold that same year to Facebook for more than $19 billion.”

How low has AIM fallen? As Rani Molli reports for Recode“As of August 2017, AIM had about 500,000 unique monthly visitors in the U.S., according to data from measurement company comScore. That doesn’t tell us exactly how many users AIM has, but it gives us a good idea of its audience.”

 

 

Your Text Messages ARE Being Spammed

13 Oct

If you are under the impression that spamming is confined to the Web and E-mail, you are wrong. Very wrong! According to recent research, text spamming is now a big problem. So, we all need to be more careful with our cell phones and one way to do so is to use stronger passwords and turn off your location tracker.

As eMarketer reports:

“Spam messages coming from SMS and messaging apps are becoming more widespread. Indeed, more than half of text message users worldwide receive an unsolicited message via SMS at least once a week, and more than a quarter say they’re spammed every day. Mobile Ecosystem Forum (MEF), a global trade body that addresses issues facing the mobile industry, and CLX Communications, a provider of cloud-based communication solutions for enterprises and mobile operates, surveyed 5,850 mobile media users in Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Nigeria, South Africa, the U.K. and the U.S. Most are being spammed frequently. In addition to the 28% of SMS users who are receiving unsolicited messages via SMS every day, 26% of mobile messaging app users are getting spam on their over-the-top (OTT) messaging apps just as frequently.”

 
Click the image to learn more.

 

Is Facebook’s Acquisition Strategy the Right Approach?

20 Feb

In recent years, Facebook has been in an aggressive acquisition mode. The most famous acquisition — until today — was Instagram in 2012 for $1 billion.

Now, Facebook has announced a bid for messaging company WhatsApp for $19 billion. Does this bid make sense. Take a look at this Wall Street Journal chart.

Source: Rani Molla/Wall Street Journal

 

Consider these observations, as reported by Reed Albergotti, Doug MacMillan, and George Stahl for the Wall Street Journal:

“‘While monetization will take time, we think the potential size of the user base and strong engagement on WhatsApp should ultimately lead to meaningful monetization,’ Sterne Agee analyst Arvind Bhatia said, adding that 70% of WhatsApp’s users use it daily, above Facebook’s 62%. ‘We note that WhatsApp’s user base is nearly 2x Twitter and growing at a significantly faster pace,’ the analyst said.”

“WhatsApp has long been seen as a takeover target for Internet giants. Google had reached out to buy the company several years ago, two people familiar with the situation said, while two other people said deal talks between the two companies also took place recently. A Google spokesman declined to comment. While Facebook’s shares fell Thursday, the decline would have been worse if Google had purchased WhatsApp.”

 Click on the image for a WSJ video.


 

How Do Consumers Feel About Marketing Via Text Messaging?

27 Sep

Check out this infographic.
 

 

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