Tag Archives: consumer research

Connected Vehicles Generate BIG Data

14 Feb

This post is a follow-up to yesterday’s.

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As we know, the auto industry is in the midst of a major technological revolution. Although self-driving vehicles have garnered a huge amount of attention, “connected” vehicles will also have an enormous impact on marketing. Why? From the consumer’s point of view, connectivity means better Bluetooth interactivity, GPS systems, entertainment systems, roadside assistance, diagnostics, and more. From the seller’s point of view, connectivity means access to lots of big data.

Consider these observations from Felix Richter, writing for Statista:

“Modern cars are equipped with more than 100 sensors that create a constant stream of data. Measuring things like location, performance, physical parameters, and driving behavior, often several times per second, the amount of data generated by these sensors is immense. According to a McKinsey estimate, connected cars create up to 25 gigabytes of data per hour. That’s the equivalent of nearly 30 hours of HD video playback and more than a month’s worth of 24-hour music streaming.”

“According to the analysts in charge of our Digital Market Outlook, the data created by connected cars have a lot of potential in terms of monetization. Think insurance companies for example, who would likely be willing to pay good money to find out more about our driving habits. For more information about this exciting new market, please download our free market report Connected Car: Vehicle Services.”

 
Take a look at this chart to see how big the data collected from connected vehicles really are.


 

Globally, How Important Is Personal Grooming?

23 Feb

We know that different genders, countries, cultures, and sub-cultures have different views about personal grooming; and they typically act accordingly.

Recently, GFK (a firm with more than 13,000 market research experts who provide global insights matched with local market intelligence from more than 100 countries) conducted an in-depth study on personal grooming:

“Findings released by GfK from a 22-country survey show that women spend an average of almost five hours a week on personal grooming (bathing, shaving, dressing, hair, make-up), while men spend just over three hours. But what are the major (as opposed to minor) reasons that motivate people to try to look their best?”

“The most popular motivation, cited by 60 percent of the 27,000 people surveyed as a major reason for trying to look their best, is to feel good about themselves. This was followed by making a good impression on people they meet for the first time (44 percent) and setting a good example for their children (40 percent).”

“Men and women mirror each other in seeing these as the top three reasons for wanting to look good. But the number one reason – feeling good about themselves – resonates more strongly with women than men (67 percent versus 52 percent), while making a good first impression and setting a good example for their children are cited by almost the same percentage of men as women.”

 

Click the images for a larger version.

 

Click the GfK logo for a PDF of the research report.


 

How Healthy Are We? Perceptions Vs. Reality

2 Sep

In this era of consumer self-awareness, marketers are interested in health-related questions such as these: Do you think YOU are healthy? If yes or no, what criteria are you using? Are you being truthful or rationalizing? How would you describe your eating patterns and level of physical activity?

Recently, Nielsen conducted in-depth research on this subject. Here are some meaningful conclusions:

“Despite the recent explosion of the health-and-wellness industry, one-third of American adults remain clinically obese. According to findings in the Nielsen/NMI Health and Wellness in America report, we literally want to have our cake and carrot juice — and eat them, too. For example, while 75 percent of us say we feel we can manage health issues through proper nutrition, a whole 91 percent of us admit to snacking all day on candy, ice cream, and chips. So, why is there a disconnect between our what we know is healthy and what we actually do? What are the perceptions around ‘health foods’ that prevent us from making better choices? And how can retailers help bridge the gap?”

Click the image to access the Nielsen health-and-wellness report.
 

 

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