Tag Archives: Suzanne Phillips

Are You Always “On”? Living in a Connected World: Segment 3

12 Jul

We live in a digitally connected world, where many of us are regularly “on.” However, some firms are still fighting back against this phenomenon. Consider this example (from Jane E. Brody, writing for the NY Times):

“Hurray for the HotBlack Coffee cafe in Toronto for declining to offer Wi-Fi to its customers. It’s HotBlack’s reason for the electronic blackout that is cause for praise. As its president, Jimson Bienenstock, explained, his aim is to get customers to talk with one another instead of being buried in their portable devices. “It’s about creating a social vibe. We’re a vehicle for human interaction, otherwise it’s just a commodity.”

 
Recently, Zarb School of Business Distinguished Professor Joel Evans of Hofstra University did an extended radio interview with Suzanne B. Phillips, Psy.D. on living in a connected world and the growing phenomenon of always being “on.” Connectivity involves using digital devices to interact with the outside world, including smartphones, smart TVs, wearable devices, GPS, computers, tablets, home security systems, and more. This interview is divided into three segments for YouTube. Click here to see Segment 1 and click here to Segment 2.
 

Segment 3 highlights these topics:

• Connectivity by social media platform
• Demographics of followers by social media platform
• Growth of mobile connectivity
• Many benefits of connectivity
• Many downsides of connectivity
• Recommendations
• Always be smart and protect yourself
• Think before posting
 
 

 

Are You Always “On”? Living in a Connected World: Segment 2

11 Jul

We live in a digitally connected world, where many of us are regularly “on.” According to Annie Kjellstrom:

“Until recently, we connected with one another in person. We planned activities around what we liked to do together, not the best status update. We made photo albums (real ones) as a tribute to good times and we only shared important updates about our lives with people who were a part of them. Being connected meant sharing ourselves with those closest to us — without a need to document, broadcast, or archive relationships.”

“Today, being ‘connected’ is a much more complicated concept. In some cases, digital connections are even required to validate offline relationships — after all, you’re not really dating unless it’s ‘Facebook official.’”

 

Recently, Zarb School of Business Distinguished Professor Joel Evans of Hofstra University did an extended radio interview with Suzanne B. Phillips, Psy.D. on living in a connected world and the growing phenomenon of always being “on.” Connectivity involves using digital devices to interact with the outside world, including smartphones, smart TVs, wearable devices, GPS, computers, tablets, home security systems, and more. This interview is divided into three segments for YouTube. Click here to see Segment 1.

 

Segment 2 highlights these topics:

• • Smartphone’s impact on quality of work – distractions
• Myth of multitasking
• Challenges of teaching in a smartphone-connected world
• Societal acceptance of always being on – no code of conduct and few limits on use
• Explosion of connected devices and how they can be used (“smart” devices)
• 13 billion connected devices for people as of 2020
• Currently, 3.6 connected devices per person
• Growth of social media platforms
• [U.S.] Lifetime, more than 5 full years per person spent on social media – more than time on eating or personal interactions
• Social media by gender

 

 

Are You Always “On”? Living in a Connected World: Segment 1

10 Jul

We live in a digitally connected world, where many of us are regularly “on.” According to a study by A.T. Kearney of 10,000 ‘connected consumers’ (people who say they connect to the Internet at least once a week):

“Our findings are fascinating and at times counterintuitive. Here’s the quick view: Continuous connectivity. More than half of survey respondents say that they are connected to the Internet nearly every waking hour.Four motivations for connectivity. People go online because it meets four basic, universal needs: interpersonal connection, self-expression, exploration, and convenience. The power of social media. Social networks are where connected consumers spend the most time online. They are effective in gaining brand interest and purchases among younger consumers. Yet, number of users on a social network is not necessarily an indication of engagement or purchases. The convergence of physical and online stores. While most purchases today are still made in store, more than half of survey respondents say they prefer shopping online and the online experience. Connectivity does not mean consumers do everything online; but being connected offers access, speed, and convenience.”

 

Recently, Zarb School of Business Distinguished Professor Joel Evans of Hofstra University did an extended radio interview with Suzanne B. Phillips, Psy.D. on living in a connected world and the growing phenomenon of always being “on.” Connectivity involves using digital devices to interact with the outside world, including smartphones, smart TVs, wearable devices, GPS, computers, tablets, home security systems, and more. This interview is divided into three segments for YouTube.
 

Segment 1 highlights these topics:

• Evolution of connectivity – today, it is much more high-tech and less personal
• How connected people are – from waking to going to sleep
• Reliance on the smartphone to access the Internet and social media
• Many of the motivations behind digital connectivity
• Time spent with and uses of digital connectivity
• Passive versus interactive connectivity
• Global perspective
• Differences by age
• Personal connectivity at work

 

 

Self-Branding Across Roles and Life Stages: Part 3

19 May

Recently, Zarb School of Business Distinguished Professor Joel Evans of Hofstra University did an extended radio interview with Suzanne Phillips, Psy.D. on self-branding from different perspectives and across our diverse roles. Self-branding — how we see ourselves and how we want to be perceived by others — is a key to long-term personal and career success.

In this post, we are including Part 3 of the interview, which is broken into three parts/posts.
 

 
 
How can you use self-branding to consider what you want to do after college?

  • Click on the self-assessment test URL at the Radio America page for this program. http://goo.gl/Fwdy9r
  •  

How can you use self-branding after retirement?

  • We have to first ask ourselves what we want to do in our retirement? Be a volunteer, travel more, work part-time, be more active as a grandparent, serve on local boards, etc.?
  • For each of these roles, we need a different (and maybe new) self-brand that we can project to others.
  • Our self-brand should be reflective of the role we are pursuing.
    • Here’s a personal example. I’m reaching the point where I am thinking about retiring from my full-time job in a couple of years.
    • My wife thinks I’ll go crazy in retirement (HER perception of my self-brand).
    • On the other hand, I have a good idea what I want to do then, as I recast my self-brand. I want to teach a graduate class at least once a year. I want to do volunteer work for a health-related nonprofit organization. I want to stay active in social media. I want to keep going to the gym and mingling with people there. I’m sure that as the time approaches, I will come up with more “to do” items. [Besides traveling more]
    • No matter what, I will have a strong impact on how others see me.

 

Self-Branding Across Roles and Life Stages: Part 2

18 May

Recently, Zarb School of Business Distinguished Professor Joel Evans of Hofstra University did an extended radio interview with Suzanne Phillips, Psy.D. on self-branding from different perspectives and across our diverse roles. Self-branding — how we see ourselves and how we want to be perceived by others — is a key to long-term personal and career success.

In this post, we are including Part 2 of the interview, which is broken into three parts/posts.
 

 
How can you translate your self-brand into a resume?

  • Join LinkedIn and browse through the profiles of others in the field you would like to have a career. Look at their descriptions of themselves.
  • Always do multiple drafts of a new resume and show them to people you trust. Include key words that are included in each job description.
  • You should always articulate your self-brand at the top of a resume. ( How – an example) Again, include buzz words from job descriptions.

Senior professor at Hofstra’s Zarb Business School. Long-time consultant. Leading textbook author. Active blogger & LI group manager. Motivated teacher. Frequent speaker. (22 words)

  • The resume should be modified to fit the job description. This is 2016, not 1976. There is no excuse for not modifying your resume to the position sought.
  • A self-brand statement should reflect the stage of your career that you are in currently.

 

Self-Branding Across Roles and Life Stages: Part 1

17 May

Recently, Zarb School of Business Distinguished Professor Joel Evans of Hofstra University did an extended radio interview with Suzanne Phillips, Psy.D. on self-branding from different perspectives and across our diverse roles. Self-branding — how we see ourselves and how we want to be perceived by others — is a key to long-term personal and career success.

In this post, we are including Part 1 of the interview, which is broken into three parts/posts.

 

  • These are some factors to consider:
    • You must have a clear sense of your self-brand.
    • What are my short-term and long-term career and personal goals?
    • How close am I to reaching these goals?
    • What specific activities must I engage in/do (in each role and life stage) to reach these goals?
    • When I set my self-brand for each role & life stage, is it perceived that way by others? Can others get beyond stereotypes? Often, others do not see us as we see ourselves.
      • If I relate this to myself, I know there are clear differences in how I view myself and how others view me – and this has evolved through my own life stages and roles undertaken.
      • Today, I am a senior citizen by virtually every definition and seen as such by some others; but I don’t see myself that way.
      • For example, as a professor, even though I am the “old guy,” I run three blogs and I’m very active in social media. So, clearly, the stereotype about seniors and social media doesn’t apply to me.
      • Also as a professor, I understand that my students today see my gray hair, wrinkles, and bald spot and do not relate to me the same way now as they did when I started teaching. To address this, I wear loud and colorful ties and socks with fun patterns (such cats’ faces), and I show a lot of videos.
      • In another recent role, as father of the bride, my friends and family saw another side of me. But it was the other side that I wanted them to see.
    • Authenticity is imperative for a self-brand to be perceived as desired by others. Faking won’t cut it.

 

Self-Branding Across Roles and Life Stages: Overview

16 May

Recently, Zarb School of Business Distinguished Professor Joel Evans of Hofstra University did an extended radio interview with Suzanne Phillips, Psy.D. on self-branding from different perspectives and across our diverse roles. Self-branding — how we see ourselves and how we want to be perceived by others — is a key to long-term personal and career success.

In this overview post, we are setting the stage for the interview, which is broken into three forthcoming parts/posts.

We have three major challenges in self-branding: (1) We must first understand ourselves and have personal clarity in deciding what self-brand we want to project to others. (2) There is often a gap between how we view ourselves and how others perceive us. We need to consider and act upon this. (3) Our self-brand must reflect EACH role we play; that is why we have multiple self-brands that we project to others (whether we realize it or not). Each role is usually distinctive: job professional, parent, friend, etc.

Consider these points from Professor Evans:

  • Honest self-assessment is a tough task for many people. We don’t like to think about our faults and hear that others have negative things to say about us. And self-assessment is time-consuming and needs to be conducted periodically – not just once. But self-assessment is perhaps the most important ingredient in crafting our self-brand for our various roles and life stages.
  • These are some factors to consider:
    • You must have a clear sense of your self-brand.
    • What are my short-term and long-term career and personal goals?
    • How close am I to reaching these goals?
    • What specific activities must I engage in/do (in each role and life stage) to reach these goals?
    • When I set my self-brand for each role & life stage, is it perceived that way by others? Can others get beyond stereotypes? Often, others do not see us as we see ourselves.
      • If I relate this to myself, I know there are clear differences in how I view myself and how others view me – and this has evolved through my own life stages and roles undertaken.
      • Today, I am a senior citizen by virtually every definition and seen as such by some others; but I don’t see myself that way.
      • For example, as a professor, even though I am the “old guy,” I run three blogs and I’m very active in social media. So, clearly, the stereotype about seniors and social media doesn’t apply to me.
      • Also as a professor, I understand that my students today see my gray hair, wrinkles, and bald spot and do not relate to me the same way now as they did when I started teaching. To address this, I wear loud and colorful ties and socks with fun patterns (such cats’ faces), and I show a lot of videos.
      • In another recent role, as father of the bride, my friends and family saw another side of me. But it was the other side that I wanted them to see.
    • Authenticity is imperative for a self-brand to be perceived as desired by others. Faking won’t cut it.

How can you translate your self-brand into a resume?

  • Join LinkedIn and browse through the profiles of others in the field you would like to have a career. Look at their descriptions of themselves.
  • Always do multiple drafts of a new resume and show them to people you trust. Include key words that are included in each job description.
  • You should always articulate your self-brand at the top of a resume. ( How – an example) Again, include buzz words from job descriptions.

Senior professor at Hofstra’s Zarb Business School. Long-time consultant. Leading textbook author. Active blogger & LI group manager. Motivated teacher. Frequent speaker. (22 words)

  • The resume should be modified to fit the job description. This is 2016, not 1976. There is no excuse for not modifying your resume to the position sought.
  • A self-brand statement should reflect the stage of your career that you are in currently.

Things I look for in a resume (starting from the top):

  1. Good grammar and spelling — reflects a lot on one’s self brand.
  2. A professional-looking e-mail address – NOT a birthday or other cute address.
  3. A clear, distinctive self-branding statement in no more than 25 words. Includes:
    1. The type of position sought.
    2. Unique skill set.
    3. Motivation/enthusiasm.
    4. Team player.
    5. The statement varies by career stage and should brand the person appropriately.
  4. Work experience:
    1. ALWAYS include buzz words related to a specific job opening.
    2. Position/self-brand each job properly.
    3. Place greater emphasis on recent jobs. Use bullet points. Cite numerical accomplishments.
    4. Older jobs and internships should be shorter and focus on accomplishment. Do NOT “dumb down” these jobs.
    5. Your work experience should reflect upward mobility/advancement and changes your self-brand over time.
    6. Be creative in citing job dates if you have been a job hopper – such as linking related positions together with a broader date range.
  5. Education:
    1. Site school, degree, major, date of graduation for each job.
    2. If you have little work experience, Be sure that you cite courses that reflect your self-brand.
    3. Only cite your GPA if it is high.
    4. Education goes first ONLY if this is the key attribute you have to offer early in your career.
  6. Special skills: Cite only distinctive or job-required skills, such as experienced with social media content or business analytics specialist.
  7. Don’t forget to have a strong LinkedIn profile and shoot to have at least 100 connections to show that you are known in the business world.

How can you use self-branding to consider what you want to do after college?

  • Click on the self-assessment test URL at the Radio America page for this program. http://goo.gl/Fwdy9r

How can you use self-branding after retirement?

  • We have to first ask ourselves what we want to do in our retirement? Be a volunteer, travel more, work part-time, be more active as a grandparent, serve on local boards, etc.?
  • For each of these roles, we need a different (and maybe new)  self-brand) that we can project to others.
  • Our self-brand should be reflective of the role we are pursuing.

 

 

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