Tag Archives: opportunities

Do YOU Understand the Multicultural Millennial?

16 May

As with other age-based groups, such as baby boomers, the diversity of millennials is often underappreciated. For example, U.S. baby boomers are all those born between 1946 and 1964. This group is certainly NOT homogeneous. The oldest baby boomers turn 71 this year, with most of them living in retirement as empty nesters. The youngest baby boomers turn 53 this year, with most of them active in the workforce and with many of them having 18-to-25 year olds living at home.

Likewise, today’s generation of millennials (those born between 1981 and 2000) is not homogeneous — an important concept for marketing strategies. Millennials are not one-size-fits-all! One way of better classifying millennials is to study their backgrounds.

According to Roger Roman, reporting for Push C&M:

“The millennial generation in the U.S. is now 75 million strong. Like any generation, millennials are not homogeneous, as the group includes consumers from a wide range of ages and ethnic backgrounds. Notably, 42% of U.S. millennials are people of African-American, Asian-American, and Hispanic heritage.”

“Multicultural millennials are carving their own paths forward in several ways: They are bridging gaps between their own generation and others, and they are bridging gaps between their birth cultures and others. This group’s comfort in different scenarios and cultures creates a virtual ‘multiplier effect,’ a key distinction from non-Hispanic white millennials.”

 

Here is an informative infographic from PUSH C&M for marketers to consider.


 

Attributes That Employers Study for Their Marketing Hires

25 Apr

What attributes do employers most value when considering candidates for marketing positions? Certainly, there are many possible answers to this question depending on the company, the specific job, and other criteria.

Nonetheless, here is an interesting delineation of factors that employers consider, as suggested by Geoffrey James for Inc.:

“Hiring great marketers can be challenging, though. Some marketers are great at appearing to be useful when they’re really accomplishing next to nothing. And, in my experience, some of the worst marketers have MBAs or years of experience. With that in mind, here’s what [employers should] look for in a marketing candidate.”

  1. A person who understands that marketing is a service. The first question to ask any candidate for a marketing job: ‘Define marketing.’ The answers will fall into three categories: (a) ‘Say whut?’ You’d be surprised how many marketers (including people with MBAs) don’t have a working definition of what they do, or plan to do, for a living. (b) ‘Marketing is strategic.’ Some marketers define marketing too broadly. Candidates who hold such bloated notions tend to squander their energy in too many directions. (c) ‘Marketing is a service.’ A top marketing candidate will tend to define marketing as a service that helps sales do its job more easily.”
  2. A person who likes being measured. Strong marketing groups (and the candidates you’d want to hire in them) are all about quantitative measurement. They’re familiar with marketing metrics (like conversion rates) and more than willing to have their work  judged on the basis of verifiable numbers.Weak marketing groups focus on activities, regardless of whether those activities generate sales opportunities or help salespeople close them. Such activities include brochures that nobody reads, fancy ads that generate zero sales leads, trade shows that are networking parties for the marketers, and more.
  3. A person who can write concisely.  We live in a constant state of information overload. Thus, the only marketing messages that are heard and remembered are short, vivid, and original. Unfortunately, some marketers are prone to use $5 words when 50¢ words would do the job better; biz-blab like ‘reach out,’ ‘circle back,’ and ‘pick your brain’; and clichés like ‘disruptive innovation,’ ‘industry-leading,’ and ‘state of the art.’ These sins can be deadly to marketers who must communicate with customers who are notoriously unwilling to wade through thick business prose.”
  4. A person who’s had some experience selling.  Great marketers have a deep respect for the job of selling. They realize that marketing is only meaningful if it helps salespeople do their job, which is much more important than any marketing task. You needn’t hold out for someone who’s sold for a living (although that would be ideal), but it is important that a marketing candidate know what it’s like to actually sell.”

Click the image to read more.

                   CREDIT: Getty Images

 

FREE: 2017 Edition of Careers in Business

11 Apr

Learn about the many opportunities and challenges facing those interested in a career in business. The latest data are included. Lots of data!!
 

Outline of Topics:
  • General Hints
  • Background Data By Occupation
  • Long-term Trends
  • Hot Long-term Business Career Opportunities
  • Bureau Of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Outlook Handbook
  • LinkedIn
  • “Find A Job” Resources

 

 

2015 Student Opportunities from Marketing Edge

9 Mar

Opportunities from Marketing EDGE

Hello,

My name is Rachel Fontana and I am the Assistant Program Manager at Marketing EDGE. Marketing EDGE is a nonprofit organization dedicated to educating, developing, growing, and employing college students in the field of marketing.

I am thrilled to announce that Marketing EDGE and Google are currently recruiting high achieving marketing students for our Interactive Marketing Immersion Xperience (I-MIX) program.

I-MIX immerses a select group of college students nationwide in seminars and workshops focused on interactive marketing. Our presenters, mostly Google staff members, will share information about what they do and provide advice on how to prepare for a successful career in the field. Furthermore, participants will have an opportunity to attend a career and resume workshop led by a premier career coach, to network with experienced marketing executives, and to compete in an interactive marketing campaign challenge.

Our 2015 I-MIX program will take place on Google’s Mountain View campus from May 30th through June 3rd.

This truly unique marketing intensive presents students with a chance to…

  • Visit Google’s main campus
  • Participate in company specific workshops and get insights into major marketing campaigns and strategies directly from top Google executives
  • Develop a better understanding of new and evolving marketing platforms: mobile, social, and search
  • Receive resume critique that will help prepare them for the tough job market ahead
  • Work on a practical marketing business case
  • Interact and network with marketing students and marketing professionals from across the country

We would love to engage your undergraduate marketing students in this year’s program and would appreciate you sharing this information with them.

All students wishing to submit their online application before the quickly approaching April 3rd deadline may do so via the following link: www.marketingedge.org/marketing-programs/imix-summer-program/imix-application.

If you or your students have any questions regarding our 2015 I-MIX program, please see the I-MIX information page or contact me directly at RFontana@marketingEDGE.org.
 
Marketing EDGE - I-MIX 2015_Page_1

Marketing EDGE - I-MIX 2015_Page_2
 

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