Tag Archives: McKinsey

Personalized Marketing’s Future Looks Engaging: Tips

4 Dec

As we know, personalized marketing is a big deal. Thus, personalized marketing’s future looks engaging [pun intended 🙂 ]. Let’s see why. And offer several tips.

 

Background on Personalized Marketing

So, how should we define personalized marketing? Consider these observations from three prior posts:

  • One of the toughest issues for marketers is how much to personalize. On the one hand, firms need as much customer data as possible to target individual shoppers. On the other hand, many customers want their privacy. And they do not appreciate it when they are overly tracked. [1]
  • In today’s high-tech marketing environment, personalization is a major competitive advantage. Thus, personalization can involve products such as the NikeiD footwear line as well one-to-one communications. As Conversant Media puts it: “Virtually everyone agrees a personalized message tailored to an individual’s wants and needs is more apt to drive a sale than a general one.” [2]
  • Neustar (a data-intelligence firm) published a report on personalized marketing. “Customers expect it. And technology enables it. As a result, brands that deliver it generate huge increases in ROI. Personalization goes beyond adding a customer’s name to communication. Customers expect relevant content in the right channel at the right time. Whether on a brand’s Web site, a social network, or an E-mail inbox. For brands, delivering one-to-one experience at scale requires leveraging complex data sets, processes, and platforms.” [3]

 

Personalized Marketing’s Future Looks Engaging

Consulting giant McKinsey & Co. produces excellent FREE material. And it covers diverse topics. Recently, it published this article. “What Shoppers Really Want from Personalized Marketing.” In that article, McKinsey notes:

“Gotten an unsolicited and irrelevant offer on something you’ve done online? Know the creepy feeling that ‘someone is watching me’? This reaction is the third rail of the drive to personalize interactions with customers. And that’s a problem because, if done right, personalization can be a huge hit. Targeted communications that are relevant and useful create lasting customer loyalty and drive revenue growth. The challenge: To personalize in a way that doesn’t cross lines and delivers genuine value and relevance. But how do you know?”

Click the image to access the article.

Personalized Marketing's Future Looks Engaging. Overview.

 

Personalized Marketing Tips

According to McKinsey, what do consumers value most?

 1. “Give me relevant recommendations I wouldn’t have thought of myself. Shoppers don’t want constant reminders of products they’ve already bought or searched for. Especially if the ads appear either too soon, too often, or too late in the process.” Instead, personalize products. The figure shows a McKinsey example of this. 

Personalized Marketing's Future Looks Engaging. Product recommendation stage.

2. “Talk to me when I’m in shopping mode. Previous order data can provide useful cues about activities. Such as ordering a gift for someone’s birthday or anniversary.”

3. “Remind me of things I want to know but might not track. So, help shoppers track specific events. Such as when someone may be running out of an item bought earlier. When a desired item is back in stock or on sale. Or when a new style is launched for a product or category the shopper has often bought.”

4. “Know me no matter where I interact with you. Thus, communications that seamlessly straddle online and offline experiences make a customer feel a firm really knows them.” And the figure shows a McKinsey example of this.

Personalized Marketing's Future Looks Engaging. Personalized discount.

5. “Share the value in a way that’s meaningful to me. For instance, loyalty programs and purchase data are useful. (a) By telling firms the products an individual customer buys. (b) By seeing how often he or she buys. (c) Be learning when they buy. (d) And by knowing what product categories they never buy. Thus, personalizing (‘gamifying’) the experience leads to purchases and new buying behavior.”

 

What Is the State of Global Fashion?

6 Dec

Around the world, the fashion industry — at all levels and for all segments — is a key driver of the global economy. It generates trillions (that’s trillions 🙂 ) of dollars of revenue and employs millions of workers.

Recently, McKinsey & Company released a detailed report on the global fashion industry. Here are some of its findings:

“Fashion is one of the past decade’s rare economic success stories. Over that period, the industry has grown at 5.5 percent annually, according to the McKinsey Global Fashion Index, to now be worth an estimated $2.4 trillion. In fact, not only does it touch everyone, but it would be the world’s seventh-largest economy if ranked alongside individual countries’ GDP.”

“Yet, 2016 was one of the industry’s toughest years. Terrorist attacks in France, the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom, and the volatility of the Chinese stock market have created shocks to the global economy. At the same time, consumers have become more demanding, more discerning, and less predictable in their purchasing behavior, which is being radically reshaped by new technologies. It’s against this backdrop that McKinsey has teamed with the Business of Fashion to shine a light on the fragmented, complex ecosystem that underpins this giant global industry.”

“So what will change in 2017? No one would put money on volatility and uncertainty lessening. Nonetheless, our report finds that fashion companies are hopeful they can improve their performance through a combination of organic growth and leveraging new technologies. Successful companies will invest more to nurture local clientele: 2017 will be the year of organic growth by deepening relationships with existing clients, rather than through geographic, channel, and store-network expansion. And digital innovation will go behind the scenes: digitization will be the key to supply-chain efficiency, lowering procurement costs, and the enhancement of sourcing opportunities.”

 svgz_insights_the-state-of-fashion-ex1_svgz
 
To access the full report, click on the image below.

 

A McKinsey Report: How Innovative Are the Chinese?

26 Oct

McKinsey & Company regularly publishes reports about doing business in China. Click here to visit its McKinsey China Web site.

McKinsey firm has just produced a new report on Chinese innovativeness:

“New research by the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) suggests that to realize consensus growth forecasts—5.5 to 6.5 percent a year—during the coming decade, China must generate two to three percentage points of annual GDP growth through innovation, broadly defined. If it does, innovation could contribute much of the $3 trillion to $5 trillion a year to GDP by 2025. China will have evolved from an ‘innovation sponge,’ absorbing and adapting existing technology and knowledge from around the world, into a global innovation leader.”

“Our analysis suggests that this transformation is possible, though far from inevitable. To date, when we have evaluated how well Chinese companies commercialize new ideas and use them to raise market share and profits and to compete around the world, the picture has been decidedly mixed. China has become a strong innovator in areas such as consumer electronics and construction equipment. Yet in others—creating new drugs or designing automobile engines, for example—the country still isn’t globally competitive. That’s true even though every year it spends more than $200 billion on research (second only to the United States), turns out close to 30,000 Ph.Ds in science and engineering, and leads the world in patent applications (more than 820,000 in 2013).”

“When we look ahead, though, we see broad swaths of opportunity. Our analysis suggests that by 2025, such new innovation opportunities could contribute $1.0 trillion to $2.2 trillion a year to the Chinese economy—or equivalent to up to 24 percent of total GDP growth.”
 

Click the image to access the full report.

 

A Provocative Take on the Future of Self-Driving Cars

26 Jun

Self-driving cars are in the late stages of testing in the United States. Besides safety issues, consumer skepticism, the regulatory environment will have a major impact on how quickly and widely that self-driving cars make it in the market.

Given that self-driving cars will/may be sold in the very near future, we need to better understand where the marketplace will be headed. Recently, McKinsey’s Michele Bertoncello and Dominik Weewe published a thought-provoking view of self-driving cars: “Ten Ways Autonomous Driving Could Redefine the Automotive World — The Development of Self-Driving, or Autonomous, Vehicles Is Accelerating. Here’s How They Could Affect Consumers and Companies.”

  1. “Industrial fleets lead the way.”
  2.  “Car OEMs [original equipment manufacturers face a decision. Automakers worldwide will likely define and communicate their strategic position on AVs in the next two to three years.”
  3.  “New mobility models emerge. While OEMs are developing autonomous vehicles, a variety of other transport-mobility innovations are already hitting the road.”
  4.  “The car-service landscape changes.”
  5.  “Car insurers might shift their business model. Car insurers have always provided consumer coverage in the event of accidents caused by human error. With driverless vehicles, auto insurers might shift the core of their business model, focusing mainly on insuring car manufacturers from liabilities from technical failure of their AVs, as opposed to protecting private customers from risks associated with human error in accidents.”
  6.  “Companies could reshape their supply chains.”
  7.  “Drivers have more time for everything. AVs could free as much as 50 minutes a day for users, who will be able to spend traveling time working, relaxing, or accessing entertainment.”
  8.  “Parking becomes easier. AVs could change the mobility behavior of consumers, potentially reducing the need for parking space in the United States by more than 5.7 billion square meters.”
  9.  “Accident rates drop. By mid-century, the penetration of AVs and other ADAS could ultimately cause vehicle crashes in the United States to fall from second to ninth place in terms of their lethality ranking among accident types.”
  10.  “AVs accelerate robotics development for consumer applications.”

 
Click the chart to read the full article.

McK1
 

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