Tag Archives: job interview

Job Interview Preparation Tips

17 Oct

The job interview may be the KEY step in the job search process. (First, you write a great resume to secure interviews!) With that in mind, this post tackles job interview preparation tips.

These are a few prior posts on the job interview.   Being Real on a Job Interview!   Be on Your BEST Behavior When Interviewing.   A Graduating B School Student Talks About Her Job Search.

 

Background

According to Hannah Morgan, writing for Savvy Intern:

“The interview is scheduled! You are ecstatic, as you should be. But now what? Begin preparing and practicing! How will you perfectly prepare for the interview? Perhaps you need an interview preparation guide. You’ve already done some preliminary research on the company. But now it’s time to dig deep. The more you know about the firm, its competitors and the overall market, the smarter you’ll appear. Too often people fail to thoroughly prepare the job interview for this specific job at this company. In other words, they tend to treat each interview as generic in nature.”

 

Job Interview Preparation Tips: 10 Steps to Success

Morgan offers a new 10-step guide with job interview preparation tips. To access her full guide, click the image below the tips.

  1. Get a Copy of the Most Current Job Description — What they’ve posted online may not be the full description or most recent version of job requirements. It isn’t unusual for a firm to have a different version of the job description for internal use. It may be more descriptive.”
  2. Prepare a Story for Each of the Job Requirements  — Go through each requirement listed in the job posting and develop an answer for how you meet the requirements.”
  3. Prepare Answers to the Most Common Interview Questions — You shouldn’t sound rehearsed. You should sound natural! Practice!
  4. Craft Your Opening Statement — You can pretty much count on this question. Prepare the best 1-minute response. Answer as if you were asked, why should we hire you.
  5. Research the Company — Look at the company Web site and career page. But don’t stop here. Google the firm and see what news is mentioned.”
  6. Know Something About the Interviewers — Thank goodness for LinkedIn. Go ahead and see where they used to work, what organizations and groups they belong to, and recommendations others have written.”
  7. Prepare Smart Questions — To understand the job and firm, ask questions! So, ask questions to learn expectations, how the team functions, and more.”
  8. Know the Format of the Interview — Will you be meet one-on-one, as a panel, via phone, Skype, or online video, and how long will the scheduled to last?”
  9. Bring Copies of Your Resume for Everyone — Don’t assume everyone will have a copy.”
  10. Know Exact Dates –If you haven’t completed an application, don’t say “see attached resume.” Fully and accurately complete the job application. It is a legal document. Do not lie, exaggerate or embellish.”

 

Job interview preparation tips. Click here to access the 10-step guide with job interview preparation tips.

 

Being Real on a Job Interview!

30 Mar

When going on job interviews, regardless of the level of the position, presenting yourself as authentic is essential. Over-inflating your accomplishments or presenting an untrue depiction of your true self often backfires.

Shane Parrish, writing for Quora, offers several valuable insights on this topic. How can a potential employer determine if an applicant is actually intelligent and not just a blowhard?

“I’ve been collecting little heuristics over the years. Here are a few that will get you thinking:

 
Now, take a a look at this short video clip from Inc. And click here to read more from Inc.

 

A Graduating B School Student Talks About Her Job Search

18 Apr

Guest Blogger

Alyson Guarino, Hofstra University

_______________________________________________

In a detailed commentary about the post “Are You Ready for a Months-Long Job Interview?”, Alyson Guarino, a graduating Zarb School of Business BBA student [and President of the Student Government Association at Hofstra] wrote the following about her job search. There are many lessons for job and internship seekers here.

After interviewing with three big firms, I can speak to the experience of having “months-long” job interviews. The interview process technically started in February 2015 when I began networking with company recruiters and current employees. In May 2015, I made sure to reach out to all of the firms that I was interested in joining, with the understanding that the hiring process began in mid-August.

In October 2015, I was selected to move forward in the interviewing process. The first round of interviews for two of the three firms were phone interviews with partners of the firm where I was interviewed on leadership, and various technical case studies. The third firm interviewed me in person and I sat with a recruiter, not a partner.

The next rounds of interviews were in person with multiple partners of the firm, and were also focused mostly around case studies, strategic thinking, and problem solving. The last round of interviews included daylong events where I was introduced to the different teams I would potentially be working with, and different partners of the firm. Offers from all three firms were extended to me in early November, and they required a response by early December.

After the offer is extended, [I learned that] the interview process is still not over because the potential employee can still have questions about the firm and want to interview the firm further. The entire process for me was 9 months, but the actual interviewing process was in fact months long.

The hiring process is a complicated and long process and when someone is seeking a job, managing the multiple interviews with various firms can seem like a full time job in itself!

Even before I began seeking full-time jobs for post graduation, I applied for internships for every winter break and summer session from 2012-2016 and each time I went through a separate hiring process.

The hiring process generally includes multiple interviews (phone and in person) as well as background checks, and drug tests. It can take a long time to hear back, but I think sending follow-up messages after the interview to thank them for their time makes it easier to follow up 2 weeks later if you have not heard anything.

The most important thing at the end of an interview that I ask is when can I expect to hear back? The most general answer is, “within 2-3 weeks”. The firms are typically in the middle of interviewing other potential candidates as well, so they need the time to decide who would be the best fit. The process can be longer for someone who was not the first choice.

After the offers were extended to me from the firms mentioned above, I had a certain amount of time to respond and if I declined the offer – they then had the chance to reach out to another potential candidate to provide an offer to them. However, they cannot receive an offer until I decline one. That means that person is waiting even longer to hear back.

The entire process can be exhausting, but can also be very rewarding. Interviewing can get easier and easier, and the entire process can actually begin to feel like second nature. I recommend staying organized and finding a way to manage all communication with the various companies that you have applied to (including correspondence, names and dates). It will come in handy when a recruiter or firm finally reaches out to you weeks later with a response, and you’re not exactly sure which company is calling. Stay organized, and enjoy the process!

 

Alyson, thanks for sharing and good luck in your job!


 

Are You Ready for a Months-Long Job Interview?

20 Jan

We know that the job hiring process is much tougher today than in the past — due to companies’ use of key-word computer software to pre-screen resumes, the downsizing of several major companies, and the number of applicants for each good job. But, another disheartening trend for job seekers is the longer hiring process used by many firms. Job seekers must be ready to deal with these trends without getting overly frustrated by them. A positive attitude, and endurance, are essential.

For example, in  today’s print version of the Wall Street Journal, Sue Shellenbarger’s report is titled “The Six-Month Job Interview”:

“It has never been easy to land a job, but a rise in hiring has added a new twist: Employers are taking nearly twice as long to hire people as they did several years ago. ​Companies need an average of 23 days to screen and hire new employees, up from 13 days in 2010, says Andrew Chamberlain, chief economist at the jobs and recruiting site Glassdoor, based on a study of nearly 350,000 interview reviews by the site’s users. Applicants run a gantlet of multiple interviews not only with bosses but with teams of prospective co-workers. Also, more people are being asked to submit business plans or face a battery of personnel tests.” [Click here to access the full Glassdoor report.]

“For job seekers, performing well during decision-making marathons requires a thick skin and new skills. Some get frustrated or blame themselves for delays in the hiring process. ‘It can be debilitating. It goes on and on,’ says Carole Osterer, Wayland, Mass., who completed a job search late last year. A human-resources manager at one employer called her with glowing comments. A month later, he called to say the company wasn’t interested after all. After another month, he reversed himself again and asked her to interview, says Ms. Osterer, a university research administrator. She did the interviews but never heard from the employer again.”

 

To read more about the elongated job search process (and see more tips like those below), click the image.

“HURDLE: Long silences between interviews are making you crazy. DO: Suppress your frustration and find a friendly way to stay in touch, such as sending an article of interest. DON’T: Call HR and demand to know your status.” Illustration: Tim Bower for The Wall Street Journal

 

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