Tag Archives: Internet

Important New Report on 2017 Internet Trends

5 Jun

For more than two decades, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers (KPCB) has produced a comprehensive annual Internet Trends Report.

The latest report was introduced at the Code Conference in Rancho Palos Verdes, California, on May 31, 2017: “The annual report compiles and analyzes data from a wide range of sources, providing insights on the state of the Internet Economy. The slideshow deck covers a broad array of topics, including global Internet user trends, advertising and E-commerce, gaming, online media, digital health, and much, much more. This guide is intended to highlight some of the key topics of discussion in this year’s edition – and to help media navigate the report.”

Thanks to KPCB for making this 355-page slideshow available through Slide Share.
 

 

Seniors More Active on the Net

3 Jun

For years, there has been a pretty direct correlation between age and Internet use — with those 65+ and older having relatively interest. But times are changing!!

As just reported by Felix Richter for Statista:

“While young people in the United States have grown up using technology and spend a substantial part of their lives online, people from older generations are not what we often refer to as ‘digital natives.’ A record 46 million seniors live in the United States and many of them are still disconnected from the digital world.”

“However, according to Pew Research Center, technology adoption of Americans aged 65 and older is on the rise. 67 percent of U.S. seniors now use the Internet, up from just 12 percent in 2000. As our chart illustrates, older Americans still trail the overall adult population in terms of tech usage, but the digital gap is no longer as pronounced as it used to be.”

 

Infographic: U.S. Seniors No Longer Disconnected From the Digital World | Statista You will find more statistics at Statista

 

Ransomware Now a BIGGER Problem — What Can YOU Do?

15 May

We have written several times before about the devastating results caused by ransomware hacking (see, for example, 1, 2, 3). “Ransomware is malware. The hackers demand payment, often via Bitcoin or prepaid credit card, from victims in order to regain access to an infected device and the data stored on it.” [Ransomware: The Smart Person’s Guide, by James Sanders]

Now, we are under the worst global cyberattack involving ransomware to date. On Friday May 12, 2017, Nicole Perlroth and David E. Sanger reported for the New York Times that:

“Hackers began exploiting malicious software stolen from the U.S. National Security Agency and executed damaging cyberattacks. This amounted to an audacious global blackmail attempt spread by the Internet. By late Friday, attacks had spread to more than 74 nations. Kaspersky Lab, a Russian cybersecurity firm, said Russia was worst-hit, followed by Ukraine, India, and Taiwan. Reports also came from Latin America and Africa. The attacks appeared to be the largest ransomware assault on record, but the scope of damage was hard to measure. It was not clear if victims were paying ransom, which began at about $300 to unlock individual computers, or even if those who did pay would regain access to their data. Transmitted via E-mail, the malicious software demanded ransom before users could be let back in — with a threat that data would be destroyed if demands were not met.”

Today, Gerry Mullany and Paul Mozur report for the New York Times that:

“A global cyberattack spread to thousands more computers on Monday as workers logged in at the start of a new workweek. Universities, hospitals, businesses, and daily life were disrupted, but no catastrophic breakdowns were reported. In Europe, where the cyberattack first emerged, officials said it appeared that a second wave — based on copycat variants of the original software — had not yet materialized. New disruptions were most apparent in Asia, where many workers had already left on Friday when the attack occurred. China reported disruptions at nearly 40,000 organizations, including 4,000 academic institutions, figures that experts say are likely to be low estimates, given the prevalence of pirated software.”

Also today, Statista’s Dyfed Loesche notes that: “Ransomware can make you want to cry. A malicious program called ‘WannaCry’ has affected 200.000 people or organizations in 150 countries since Friday. Data by Symantec show that almost every industrial sector has been affected by ransomware in recent years. However, some types of companies are more vulnerable or more often targeted by cybercriminals trying to extort money for data than others. The analysis shows that the services sector was by far most affected by ransomware in 2016.”

 

Check out Statista’s synopsis. Click the chart for a larger view.

 

What Can YOU Do to Better Protect Against Ransomware?

Unfortunately, there is nothing that we can do to 100% protected against malicious ransomware. However, there are steps we can take to better safeguard our computers, phones, tablets, and other smart devices. Here are several tips, first, an infographic from Europol (click the image for a larger version) and, then, a few links:

 

How Dominant Is Amazon Online?

24 Apr

It’s no surprise to any of us that Amazon is by far the leading online U.S. retailer. But would you be surprised to learn that Apple’s most recent annual online revenues exceeded those of Walmart? Or to learn that Amazon’s online revenues for its most recent year were greater than the next 14 U.S. retailers COMBINED (according to eMarketer)?

In the following chart compiled by us from eMarketer, E-commerce and store revenues are shown for the 15 leading online U.S. retailers. Highlighted in the chart are E-commerce revenues, growth in E-commerce revenues, E-commerce revenues as a % of company revenues, store sales and store sales growth, and overall revenues and revenue growth for the firms’ most recent reported year.  [Note: The table shows that Amazon had more than $40 billion in B2B revenues].

Among store-based retailers in the chart, E-revenues as a % of company revenues are highest for Williams-Sonoma, Nordstrom, Macy’s, and Gap. They are lowest for Walmart, Costco, Target, and Home Depot. And while E-commerce sales grew for most firms in the chart, store revenues  declined for more retailers.

Click here to see the same types of data from eMarketer on many more retailers. Click the chart for a larger version of it.

 


 

Is Yahoo a Good Buy for Verizon?

17 Oct

When it began in 1994 and for many years thereafter, Yahoo was a Web dynamo with tons of viewers, a leading search engine, lots of content, multiple points of contact, and more. But in recent years, Yahoo has fallen on really tough times. Hopefully, it will still have something to offer Verizon after the latter’s recent purchase of Yahoo (click here to see the current URL).

Consider the title of this Forbes article by Brian Solomon — “Yahoo Sells To Verizon In Saddest $5 Billion Deal In Tech History”:

“Yahoo was once the king of the Internet, a $125 billion behemoth as big in its time as Facebook or Google are today. Now it’s being sold to Verizon for comparative chump change. But the biggest story is how Yahoo squandered its massive head start and let each wave of new technology in search, social, and mobile pass it by. Yahoo remains largely the same company it was a decade ago — a portal that hundreds of millions of users rely on for everything from news and weather to key functions like E-mail and games like fantasy football. Yet Yahoo missed the opportunity of a generation to convert its early lead and millions of users into more than just a portal. As the attention of the world shifted to smartphone apps, Yahoo’s last advantage in the desktop world has faded.”

“The one thing that kept Yahoo afloat for this long is Jerry Yang’s risky $1 billion bet on Alibaba in 2005. That bought 40% in what would become China’s E-commerce king. Yahoo sold parts of that holding over time, but its current stake is still worth more than $30 billion at today’s prices. However, the investment was so successful that it became worth far more than Yahoo’s flagging core business.”

 
Now, eMarketer reports still more bad news for Yahoo and new parent Verizon:

“Yahoo is looking at sizeable decreases in ad revenues according to eMarketer’s latest forecast of worldwide ad spending. And recent news about issues with the company’s E-mail service, including both hacked passwords and news of an undisclosed surveillance program, isn’t helping. eMarketer expects Yahoo’s ad business to decrease in size this year—and not for the first time. After a 3.5% drop in worldwide ad revenues in 2015, in September, eMarketer predicted a further 10.2% decrease for 2016. We expect growth of under 1% next year, and 1% in 2018.”

 

An Infographic Look at the Evolution of Web Design

16 Mar

Web design and the quality/features of Web sites have certainly come a long way over the last 25 years.

AmeriCommerce has put together an excellent infographic on the evolution of Web design:

“During the 25 years since the Internet entered our lives, change has been the only constant. And nowhere has that trend of ongoing change been more evident than in the world of Web design. We all know how important great design is today, but what did Web design look like in 1990? How has it changed over the years? And what can we expect to happen in coming years? We take a look at the history of Web design in our latest infographic.”

 
The History of Web Design
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Internet Security Threats: 2014

5 Oct

Symantec — which provides security, storage, and systems management solutions — has released its Internet Security Threat Report 2014, a comprehensive 98-page document:

“Symantec has established the most comprehensive source of Internet threat data in the world through the Symantec™ Global Intelligence Network, which is made up of more than 41.5 million attack sensors and records thousands of events per second. This network monitors threat activity in over 157 countries and territories through a combination of Symantec products and services such as Symantec DeepSight™ Threat Management System, Symantec™ Managed Security Services, Norton™ consumer products, and other third-party data sources.”

Click the image to access a PDF file of the full report.
 
Internet Security 2014
 

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