A Message of Hope: Happiness Is a Choice

2 Jan

As we begin 2017, we are reblogging our most important post EVER! from among of the nearly 1,500 posts that have appeared on Evans on Marketing.

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A HEALTH AND HAPPY 2017 TO YOU AND YOURS!

Since beginning more than four years ago, Evans on Marketing has always presented posts in a professional and informative way on a wide range of business topics. Before this post, we (Joel Evans) have never written about ourselves on a personal level. As we usher in the New Year, this is a special post.

Today only, I am breaking break with our practice to cover a topic of extreme personal and societal importance. In this blog, I am going public on a private matter (being a cancer survivor) with the intent of helping others to deal with the ramifications of this insidious disease. The post is to dedicated to my family, my friends, and my wonderful group of doctors Thank you!

To quote the great Yankee baseball player Lou Gehrig, when he was honored at Yankee Stadium shortly before his death from ALS: “Today, I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the earth.” Here’s why. [After my story, PLEASE listen to the radio show in which I participated.]

In early 2015, my wonderful endocrinologist Dr. Joseph Terrana saw the results of a routine blood test that was part of my regular three-month testing as a diabetic and did not like the results. So, he sent me for an immediate CT-scan which showed a lump in my pancreas. Within a couple of weeks, I underwent 9-hour Whipple surgery by Dr. Gene Coppa of Northwell and the Hofstra Medical School. The tumor was malignant, but removed in full. After a short recuperation to build my strength, I then underwent six months of chemotherapy and other treatments under the supervision of Dr. Jeffrey Vacirca and his right-hand person Diana Youngs, nurse-practitioner, of NSHOA.

Why do I consider myself so lucky?

  • I was diagnosed REALLY early and able to have surgery shortly after my diagnosis. Unfortunately, pancreatic cancer can be a real killer because it is usually diagnosed too late. Eighty percent of those who get PC are diagnosed too late to have surgery.
  • My family and friends have been terrific since day one, and I have bonded with many other cancer survivors.
  • My medical team has been extraordinary. Besides being excellent professionals, they are caring and devoted people who are dedicated to making our lives as comfortable as possible.
  • I work in a profession that I love. I have been at Hofstra University for 42 years now; and except for having to sit out the spring 2015 semester, I have not missed a single class during the three semesters since then.
  • I have an innate personality trait and drive that encourage me to be upbeat about dealing with life’s events. That is why I have two mantras: “Live life every day” and “Happiness is a choice.”
  • On February 12, 2017, I will celebrate two years since my surgery. After finishing chemotherapy at the end of August 2015, I have had all clean CT-scans. Yea. My plan is to be around for many more years. 🙂

ADVICE:

  1. Do not avoid the doctor because you are afraid of what he/she may find.
  2. Early detection is the best way to mitigate your health problems. Have regular checkups and blood tests.
  3. Listen to the medical professionals!
  4. Surround yourself with family and friends who are supportive.
  5. Be upbeat; getting down is counter productive. [(a) When diagnosed, I set two goals: to dance at my daughter’s October 2015 wedding and to deliver a toast. Mission accomplished. I never thought these things wouldn’t happen. (b) People don’t believe me when I remark that I never said “why me”? Instead I say, “boy was I lucky to be diagnosed so early.”]
  6. Seek out your friends/acquaintances who have also dealt with cancer. They can be a wonderful resource and sounding board (when you don’t want to further burden your family).
  7. Be active. [I went to the gym while undergoing chemotherapy.]
  8. Live for tomorrow and the time thereafter. [In my case, that has meant getting involved with the Lustgarten Foundation, which engages in PC research. Click here to donate. My new passion is to give back to others through volunteer work.]

If you’re down to this point, thanks for reading. Next is a podcast from a radio show on which I appeared with two other cancer survivors:

“Wishing You a New Year of Hope and Resilience — The New Year’s Podcast 2017 on Psych Up Live is one that will invite you to embrace your own resilience and underscore the power of connection, gratitude and hope.”

“Surviving Cancer: Personal Glimpses of Resilience: In this episode Professor Joel Evans, Patricia Malone, and Dave Berger will share personal glimpses of their diagnosis, treatment and survival from cancer. You will hear about the impact of diagnosis, the role of family and friends. The question of stigma and the response of colleagues. You will hear about the expected and unexpected, the trust in medical teams and the personal factors that each drew upon to keep on going at the roughest of times. These are stories of pain, persistence, fear, gratitude and possibility.”

What Are the Toughest Languages to Translate?

31 Dec

As we approach the end of 2016, we have presented some of the most popular of the nearly 1,500 posts that have appeared on Evans on Marketing. Today, to finish 2016, we discuss how difficult it is compete in multiple languages.

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When firms go global, language translation becomes more complex and time-consuming.

Dana Translation notes that:

“In today’s global environment and economy, interesting and important come in many languages. People and organizations often need to unlock the meaning within those documents with a perfect translation that conveys the intent of the document.”

“Many people don’t realize that languages don’t have a direct word-to-correlation, so a good translation requires an understanding of the nuances and shades of meaning in each language. Rules of grammar and the way people express themselves using figures of speech vary from culture to culture, and words with the same meaning may have different connotations that can slant the feeling that a translation conveys if chosen unwisely. That’s why machine translations so often go wrong, and why it pays to have a comprehensive translation service on your side.”

 

According to Dana, these are the hardest languages to translate.

 

Tis the Season to Be Inspired and Hopeful — and Live Life Every Day

30 Dec

A HEALTH AND HAPPY 2017 TO YOU AND YOURS!

Since beginning more than four years ago, Evans on Marketing has always presented posts in a professional and informative way on a wide range of business topics. Before this post, we (Joel Evans) have never written about ourselves on a personal level. As we usher in the New Year, this is a special post.

Today only, I am breaking break with our practice to cover a topic of extreme personal and societal importance. In this blog, I am going public on a private matter (being a cancer survivor) with the intent of helping others to deal with the ramifications of this insidious disease. The post is to dedicated to my family, my friends, and my wonderful group of doctors Thank you!

To quote the great Yankee baseball player Lou Gehrig, when he was honored at Yankee Stadium shortly before his death from ALS: “Today, I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the earth.” Here’s why. [After my story, PLEASE listen to the radio show in which I participated.]

In early 2015, my wonderful endocrinologist Dr. Joseph Terrana saw the results of a routine blood test that was part of my regular three-month testing as a diabetic and did not like the results. So, he sent me for an immediate CT-scan which showed a lump in my pancreas. Within a couple of weeks, I underwent 9-hour Whipple surgery by Dr. Gene Coppa of Northwell and the Hofstra Medical School. The tumor was malignant, but removed in full. After a short recuperation to build my strength, I then underwent six months of chemotherapy and other treatments under the supervision of Dr. Jeffrey Vacirca and his right-hand person Diana Youngs, nurse-practitioner, of NSHOA.

Why do I consider myself so lucky?

  • I was diagnosed REALLY early and able to have surgery shortly after my diagnosis. Unfortunately, pancreatic cancer can be a real killer because it is usually diagnosed too late. Eighty percent of those who get PC are diagnosed too late to have surgery.
  • My family and friends have been terrific since day one, and I have bonded with many other cancer survivors.
  • My medical team has been extraordinary. Besides being excellent professionals, they are caring and devoted people who are dedicated to making our lives as comfortable as possible.
  • I work in a profession that I love. I have been at Hofstra University for 42 years now; and except for having to sit out the spring 2015 semester, I have not missed a single class during the three semesters since then.
  • I have an innate personality trait and drive that encourage me to be upbeat about dealing with life’s events. That is why I have two mantras: “Live life every day” and “Happiness is a choice.”
  • On February 12, 2017, I will celebrate two years since my surgery. After finishing chemotherapy at the end of August 2015, I have had all clean CT-scans. Yea. My plan is to be around for many more years. 🙂

ADVICE:

  1. Do not avoid the doctor because you are afraid of what he/she may find.
  2. Early detection is the best way to mitigate your health problems. Have regular checkups and blood tests.
  3. Listen to the medical professionals!
  4. Surround yourself with family and friends who are supportive.
  5. Be upbeat; getting down is counter productive. [(a) When diagnosed, I set two goals: to dance at my daughter’s October 2015 wedding and to deliver a toast. Mission accomplished. I never thought these things wouldn’t happen. (b) People don’t believe me when I remark that I never said “why me”? Instead I say, “boy was I lucky to be diagnosed so early.”]
  6. Seek out your friends/acquaintances who have also dealt with cancer. They can be a wonderful resource and sounding board (when you don’t want to further burden your family).
  7. Be active. [I went to the gym while undergoing chemotherapy.]
  8. Live for tomorrow and the time thereafter. [In my case, that has meant getting involved with the Lustgarten Foundation, which engages in PC research. Click here to donate. My new passion is to give back to others through volunteer work.]

If you’re down to this point, thanks for reading. Next is a podcast from a radio show on which I appeared with two other cancer survivors:

“Wishing You a New Year of Hope and Resilience — The New Year’s Podcast 2017 on Psych Up Live is one that will invite you to embrace your own resilience and underscore the power of connection, gratitude and hope.”

“Surviving Cancer: Personal Glimpses of Resilience: In this episode Professor Joel Evans, Patricia Malone, and Dave Berger will share personal glimpses of their diagnosis, treatment and survival from cancer. You will hear about the impact of diagnosis, the role of family and friends. The question of stigma and the response of colleagues. You will hear about the expected and unexpected, the trust in medical teams and the personal factors that each drew upon to keep on going at the roughest of times. These are stories of pain, persistence, fear, gratitude and possibility.”

Technology and Planned Obsolescence

27 Dec

As we approach the end of 2016, we are going to present some of the most popular of the nearly 1,500 posts that have appeared on Evans on Marketing. Today, we cover the topic of planned obsolescence.

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As defined in Evans Berman’s Marketing: “Planned obsolescence is a marketing practice that capitalizes on short-run material wearout, style changes, and functional product changes. In material planned obsolescence, firms choose materials and components that are subject to comparatively early breakage, wear, rot, or corrosion. In style planned obsolescence, a firm makes minor changes to differentiate the new year’s offering from the prior year’s. With functional planned obsolescence, a firm introduces new product features or improvements to generate consumer dissatisfaction with currently owned products.”

In recent years, NO company has applied planned obsolescence more than Apple. Yes, this practice has led to rapid advances in the technology of music players, tablets, and smartphones. But, does Apple’s philosophy also spur consumers to buy new product versions that they don’t need?

Apple has recently been criticized for its planned obsolescence strategy. Do YOU agree with this criticism?

Consider these observations by Catherine Rampell, writing for the New York Times:

“The new software and recent app updates from Apple offer fancy new features that existing users want; maybe the battery is sealed with tiny five-point screws for aesthetic considerations. Perhaps, but this isn’t the first time that tech analysts and random crazies on the Internet have noted that breakdowns in older Apple products can often coincide with when upgrades come onto the market. Many have taken this as evidence of ‘planned obsolescence,’ a term that dates to the Great Depression, when a real-estate broker suggested that the government should stimulate the economy by placing artificial expiration dates on consumer products so people would buy more.”

“There is, however, a simple way to effectively render an old product obsolete without fleecing your existing customers. Instead of degrading the old model, companies can offer innovations in the new model that make upgrading irresistible. Apple succeeded at doing this for a while, offering new iPhones that included major improvements. In the past, consumers were so excited about the cool new features, like Siri, the voice-activated interface, that they may not have minded (or even noticed) if their old phones started to deteriorate; they planned on upgrading anyway. This time around, that’s less true. The iPhone 5S and 5C offer fewer quantum improvements. Consumers are more likely to want their old phones to continue working at peak condition in perpetuity, and to feel cheated when they don’t.”

[Note from Evans on Marketing: Many consumers still believe that Apple practices planned obsolescence with its latest lines of phones, tablets, and computers. In 2016, for the first time in years, had a quarterly sales drop. Do YOU agree or disagree?]

 

 
Click the image to read more.

Illustration by Kelsey Dake

 

Congratulations Hofstra Marketing

26 Dec

The Marketing Faculty in the Zarb School of Business at Hofstra University is proud that our programs are included in TWO new 2017 rankings by College Choice, which “is an independent online publication dedicated to helping students and their families find the right college. We publish rankings and reviews that make choosing the best college easier, as well as resources to help students get into, pay for, and thrive at the college of their choice.”
 

Top 50 Bachelor’s in Marketing Programs for 2017

“Marketing managers—as well as their close cousins, advertising and promotions managers—generate interest in products and services. They work with just about everyone in an organization to do one thing really well: getting the word out! That’s not always as easy as it sounds. In order to get the word out, marketers have to understand what their promoting as well as the demand that’s out there for it—or in some cases, isn’t out there at all!There’s also the question of competition—in order to succeed, you have to know your enemy, and marketers will have intimate knowledge of their competitors’ products and services as well in order to best position themselves for success. They are also media wizards who use all sorts of mediums and platforms to get their message out.”

“There’s good news for the future of this profession, too. Nearly all sectors of marketing are slated to grow between 5 and 9 percent over the next several years according to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, and pay continues to look rewarding with median annual wages holding steady between $95,000 and $130,000 per year. Not too shabby!”

Number 36: “Through Hofstra’s Frank G. Zarb School of Business, students can earn a Bachelor of Business Administration with a major in Marketing. Dual degree programs are also available, allowing students to earn a bachelor’s and a master’s degree at an accelerated pace. Regardless of the degree program, Hofstra’s Department of Marketing & International Business provides exposure to award-winning faculty, internships with well-known companies in a variety of industries, and study abroad options.”

bachelors-2017
 

Top 35 Master’s in Marketing Programs for 2017

“From building an entire brand ethos to developing a network of relationships with people equally committed to innovative and sustainable progress, a career in marketing has literally innumerable possibilities. The degree can be applied to nearly every aspect of the business industry as well as the non-profit, government, health, and education sectors. Whatever your passion, marketing can be easily combined with it.”

“The Bureau of Labor Statistics anticipates a 19 percent growth in marketing research analysis in the next ten years, and a 9 percent growth in marketing management. On average, those with bachelors degrees in marketing make around $62,000 annually; however, for those who go on to get a masters degree—either in marketing specifically, or a MBA with specialization in marketing—those numbers easily double. In juxtaposing the job growth with the return on investment, it becomes clear that obtaining a graduate degree in marketing will serve you now and in the long run.”

Number 29: “Marketing graduate students, working toward a Masters of Science in Marketing, at Hofstra University take classes on distribution, internet marketing, social media utilization, marketing across cultures, analytics, customer behavior, innovation and new product marketing, business-to-business marketing, and sustainability marketing. Most notably, Hofstra students are prepared to become leaders in middle- to upper-level positions in an range of business settings. The program at Hofstra is unique in its emphasis on diversity and global perspective. Students are taught to communicate effectively, whatever the setting, to work well in teams, and to evaluate the social and ethical responsibilities of marketing in business organizations. They are also able to work and study outside of the traditional classroom and participate in several of real-world projects.”

masters-2017
 

The Psychology of Color

21 Dec

As we approach the end of 2016, we are going to present some of the most popular of the nearly 1,500 posts that have appeared on Evans on Marketing. Today, we cover how colors affect consumers’ product perceptions.
 

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From a marketing perspective, we tend to believe “perception is reality” — which means that what shoppers believe about product features is more important than the reality of those features.

With this in mind, Rachel Griffith has written a fascinating article for Fast Company on the impact of color on consumer perceptions. As she notes:

“When it comes to identifying your brand, your logo is probably the first thing your customers will think of. While honing the narrative and message behind your logo should of course be your primary concern, research suggests that your logo’s design — and specifically its colors — have more bearing on your customers’ opinions than you might think. Neuroscientist Bevil Conway, who has focused his recent research almost entirely on the neural machinery behind color, believes the science behind color processing to be very powerful and completely underexploited.”

“According to research complied by web design and marketing company WebPageFX, people make a subconscious judgment about a product in less than 90 seconds of viewing, and a majority of these people base that assessment on color alone. In fact, almost 85% of consumers cite color as the primary reason they buy a particular product, and 80% of people believe color increases brand recognition.”

To learn more about the perceptions of people with regard to red, yellow, blue, orange, green, and purple, click on the infographic from Fast Company.

 


 

Best Business Decisions Ever?

19 Dec

As we approach the end of 2016, we are going to present some of the most popular of the nearly 1,500 posts that have appeared on Evans on Marketing. Today, we cover our MOST popular post ever.

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In 2012, a book titled The Greatest Business Decisions of All Time was published. This book is by Verne Harnish (CEO of Gazelles) and the editors of Fortune.

As Fortune’s Brian Dumaine said:

“Once in a great while a leader makes a truly game-changing decision that shifts not only the strategy of a single company but how everyone does business as well. These big decisions are counter-intuitive — they go against the conventional wisdom. In hindsight, taking a different direction may seem easy, but these bet-the-company moves involve drama, doubt, and high tension. What made Apple’s board bring back Steve Jobs to the company?”

“What motivated Henry Ford to double the wages of his autoworkers, and how did that change the American economy for the next century? Why did Intel decide to spend millions to brand a microchip? The following stories, adapted from the new book The Greatest Business Decisions of All Time, provide the background to these pivotal moments. You’ll learn how these groundbreaking decisions have shaped the thinking of today’s top leaders.”

 
Click the image to read the introduction of the book. [Please note: Since the publication of the original post, Fortune has removed its excerpts. However, the book introduction may be accessed from Amazon. After clicking the book cover below, wait for the pages to fully load; then scroll down to the introduction (which starts at p. 27). It is VERY interesting.]


 
What other “big” business decisions would YOU cite besides those noted?
 

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