Tag Archives: Google

Facebook and Google: Stronger Rules for Online Advertisers

5 Sep

In response to some complaints about online ads, both Facebook and Google have been working on expanded rules for advertisers to follow.

FACEBOOK

As described by Working Media Group:

“Facebook continues to crack down on the shady side of its social network. Last month, Facebook announced that it has started fighting back against advertisers and page owners that link to sites that violate Facebook’s rules but hide those links from Facebook’s reviewers. In the past, these offenders would disguise the actual destination of the link attached to an ad or post, or they would come up with ways to dupe Facebook’s reviewers by directing them to a dummy page when vetting a link but would take people using Facebook’s mobile app to the offending page. But Facebook has figured out how to detect these so-called ‘cloaking’ schemes.”

“Any advertiser or page that Facebook finds disguising links that violate its Advertising Policies and/or Community Standards will be banned, the company said. Pages that don’t use cloaking shouldn’t be affected. Since going after cloaked links over the past few months, Facebook has fended off “thousands of these offenders,” according to the blog post.”

 

Click the image to read more from Facebook about its new process.

 

GOOGLE

As George Slefo reports for Advertising Age:

“Betty Crocker might want to check her inbox Thursday [last month]. The iconic brand is one of roughly a thousand online publishers were set to receive an email from Google warning them that they are showing ‘highly annoying, misleading, or harmful’ ads. Although there aren’t many ads on Betty Crocker’s Web site, it does have popups, especially on its mobile site. And that’s in violation of the Better Ads Standard, an industry effort born within the Coalition for Better Ads. Google is part of the Justice League-type group, as are Facebook, Procter & Gamble, Unilever, Washington Post,Interactive Advertising Bureau, ad-buying giant GroupM, Association of National Advertisers, and others. But Google carries particular weight because it’s the self-appointed hero that plans to block ‘annoying’ ads in its popular Chrome browser starting early next year.”

 

Credit: Illustration by Tam Nguyen/ Ad Age

 

Click here to access the site of the Coalition for Better Ads.

Click here to access Google’s Ad Experience Report tool.

 

Which Are the Leading B2B Firms?

23 Mar

A lot of public attention is paid to business-to-consumer (B2C) companies, far more than to business-to-business (B2B) firms — even though B2B firms generate trillions of dollars of revenue per year. Interestingly, some of the leaders in B2B are also leaders in B2B!

To partly close the public visibility gap, Sacunas annually publishes a list of the top 100 business-to-business companies:

“We believe the best brands don’t just command the most market share; they’re the companies that also make experience a part of their success. We took a holistic approach to identifying the Top 100 Global B2B Brands of 2016 to find those that focused on more than revenue. We measured multiple brand data points across their people, products, digital footprints, market command, and innovation. Our companies to watch are digitally-savvy market leaders who will be defining their industry landscapes for 2017. They are forward thinkers who know how to push the right boundaries, treat employees, and simply have some serious B2B swag.”

“In today’s economy, price point no longer defines market share; experiences are the strategic differentiator for brands. Consumers, especially millennials, are willing to pay a premium for optimally designed experiences. The companies that rose to our top ten B2B brands are experience connoisseurs – they know how to design for their customers and end consumers. These companies not only do their research and make great products, but they also design seamless experiences and invest significantly in innovation – driving the design economy towards the next big thing.”

The top 5 organizations in the new B2B list are [click the company names to see why]:

  1. Google/Alphabet
  2. General Electric
  3. Intel
  4. AECOM
  5. Apple

Note: About 15 of the top 100 B2B firms also have a significant in B2C markets.
 
Click the image to see the full list of 100 organizations.

 

The Best Firms If You Want to Work in Tech

8 Mar

If you want to work for a technology company, TechRepublic has ranked these as the best employers [Click the company names to visit their jobs’ Web sites.]:

  1. Facebook — “Never pay for lunch (or dry cleaning) again when you start your career at Facebook. In addition to health insurance, employees are given benefits such as $700 a year for fitness and $250 annually for running Facebook ads.”
  2. Google — “This pet-friendly workplace is designed so no employee is ever more than 150 feet food.  massages are subsidized, transportation is sustainable, and game rooms are pretty much everywhere. And every employee is encouraged to spend 20 percent of time working on a personal passion project.”
  3. World Wide Technology –“The CEO’s Glassdoor approval rating is 100 percent. About 75 percent of employees use the firm’s telecommuting option. And World Wide Technology has an on-site clinic where employees and family members can see doctors and stay healthy.”
  4. FAST Enterprises — “Its Annual General Meeting (AGM) is an all-expense paid, annual trip for employees and their families where they are recognized for accomplishments. These workers are known as FASTies.”
  5. LinkedIn — “Its speaker series has hosted the likes of President Obama. The cafe has kombucha on tap, and there’s a rock wall right there in the office.”

 
Click the image for a TechRepublic slideshow of TWENTY top technology employers.

Courtesy of Apple


 

How Do YOU Feel About Chatbots?

20 Jun

Now that chatbots have been gaining in popularity, what exactly is a chatbot and what does it do? According to Scott Carey, writing for Techworld:

“Before chatbots, there were just bots — based on software designed to automate a specific task. A chatbot is built on the same premise; however, it delivers this task around a single function, namely chat, or simulated conversation. A chatbot uses machine learning to pick up on conversational cadences, allowing it to effectively mimic human conversation and react to spoken or written prompts to deliver a service.”

“The chatbot is essentially a user interface which can be plugged into a number of data sources via APIs [application program interfaces] so it can deliver information or services on demand, such as weather forecasts or breaking news.”

As further discussed by Knowledge@Wharton:

“While chatbots have been around in various rudimentary forms for years — think of Clippy, Microsoft’s paper clip virtual assistant — they have been taking off lately as advances in machine learning and artificial intelligence make them more versatile than ever. Among the most well-known chatbots: Apple’s Siri.”

“In rapid succession over the past few months, Microsoft, Facebook, and Google have each unveiled their chatbot strategies, touting the potential for this evolving technology to aid users and corporate America with its customer-service capabilities as well as business utility features like organizing a meeting. Yahoo joined the bandwagon recently, launching its first chatbots on a chat app called Kik Messenger.”

 
Click the image to read more from Knowledge@Wharton.


 

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