Advertisers Get Ready for the Super Bowl

31 Jan

Sunday’s a big day. And not just for football! It’s also the Super Bowl of Advertising. As you can see from the chart below, companies spent $262.5 million just for advertising time in 2012 (and this did not include the cost of producing those ads). The numbers for the 2013 Super Bowl are even higher — with some ad rates hitting $4 million per ONE 30-second commercial.

Click the chart for an interesting Wall Street Journal article on 2013’s Super Bowl advertising. And click here for a video preview of some ads and the importance of the half-time show.
 

 

7 Responses to “Advertisers Get Ready for the Super Bowl”

  1. Jeffrey Benesch January 31, 2013 at 9:32 am #

    I must say I am not really surprised by the figures for advertising costs during the Super Bowl. The sheer number of people who tune in to watch the game I believe already make the cost of ads during this time a worthwhile investment. Now add in the fact that ads during the Super Bowl are actually a huge pull for many of the viewers. The ads are just as big a talking and social point the next day as the game itself. Also if a company manages to make a successful ad they can be talked about for months and be mentioned among consumers for many Super Bowls thereafter.

  2. Nick Cavallino January 31, 2013 at 12:46 pm #

    Super Bowl Sunday is one of the biggest days in television for football fans, sports fans in general, and even people who have placed bets on each team. Throughout the game, a number of commercials come on and catch the attention of everyone watching. With its viewing numbers being very high, each commercial will attract existing advocates for their good/service, or attract new members who might be interested. Either way, it is a big day as well for companies to get their good or service out there. However, with ad rates being that high, the companies must have to execute in a highly fashionable and influential way, in order to catch the attention of the viewers.

  3. Steven Nadraus January 31, 2013 at 4:04 pm #

    That taco bell commercial looks hilarious! I love how the small print simply says “Do not do this”. Advertisements during the Super Bowl are definitely a high risk, high reward opportunity. It is one of the biggest stages for companies to showcase themselves and gain publicity. I am not surprised that Beyone will be doing the half time show. Jay-Z and his stunning wife always seem to capitalize on big money making opportunities. Beyonce is a great performer so I think the show will be good this year. I’m very excited to watch the game and all the other aspects of Super Bowl XLVII !

  4. Jeremy Musella February 1, 2013 at 8:22 pm #

    While I am disappointed my New York Jets did not make the Super Bowl, I, like millions of people throughout the world, will watch the Super Bowl. In my opinion, the grandeur of the Super Bowl is what makes it attractive to advertisers, fans of the other 30 NFL teams who are not represented in the game, and people who do not watch football at all. All eyes are on the Super Bowl, so companies know that people will watch their ads. If a company is spending $4 million on ONE ad, it better be a memorable commercial. Advertising during the Super Bowl is definitely high risk, high reward. The anticipation and hype surrounding the commercials is talked about as much as the game itself, so if a commercial is memorable and gets consumers discussing your product/service after the game, it will pay. However, the disappointing ads will be soon forgotten. Everyone remembers the winners (both of the Super Bowl and the ads).

  5. Sami Waseem February 5, 2013 at 6:49 pm #

    Although Super Bowl ads are extremely costly, such as $4 million for a 30 second slot, the benefit of the advertisement can sometimes last a lifetime. People do not forget a memorable ad and the fact that it is shown to such a large audience at a single given time leaves that ad to be even more memorable than it actually is or would be during normal air time. So although the prices are high, you’re not just paying for a 30 second slot, you’re investing in an advertisement that can mold and shape your company for a lifetime.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. The Most Talked-About Super Bowl Ads of All Time « Evans on Marketing - February 3, 2013

    […] value of Super Bowl advertising is not based solely on the number of eyeballs tuned into the game — far from […]

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