According to consulting firm McKinsey:

Between now and 2025, the world’s top 600 cities (measured by absolute GDP) are expected to drive nearly two-thirds of global economic growth. Massive urbanization will continue across emerging markets, which will envelope three-quarters of these large cities. It is projected that by 2025, there will be 60 megacities — more than double the current number of urban behemoths — where GDP will exceed $250 billion, accounting for a full one-quarter of global GDP.”

As of 2025, “out of the 25 largest growth-contributing cities, 21 will be located in emerging markets, with a significant number of them in China. This represents a great leap from today’s status quo, in which only 4 of the 25 wealthiest cities are found in the developing world. Yet economic growth does not automatically mean consumption development — or luxury-market growth. Market growth in these cities is indeed conditioned by specific factors that differ from city to city. Variables such as birth rate, wealth distribution, and share of working women correspondingly affect growth in categories such as baby food, beauty products, luxury goods, and women’s fashion. To prioritize their efforts, companies will need to identify the biggest and fastest-growing cities with regard to their particular products and services.”

In McKinsey’s report The Glittering Power of Cities for Luxury Growth, Aimee Kim, Nathalie Remy, and Jennifer Schmidt describe “a road map of where luxury-goods companies should compete in the next decade.”

Here are two charts from that report.

 

 

 

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