Tag Archives: online advertising rules

Facebook and Google: Stronger Rules for Online Advertisers

5 Sep

In response to some complaints about online ads, both Facebook and Google have been working on expanded rules for advertisers to follow.

FACEBOOK

As described by Working Media Group:

“Facebook continues to crack down on the shady side of its social network. Last month, Facebook announced that it has started fighting back against advertisers and page owners that link to sites that violate Facebook’s rules but hide those links from Facebook’s reviewers. In the past, these offenders would disguise the actual destination of the link attached to an ad or post, or they would come up with ways to dupe Facebook’s reviewers by directing them to a dummy page when vetting a link but would take people using Facebook’s mobile app to the offending page. But Facebook has figured out how to detect these so-called ‘cloaking’ schemes.”

“Any advertiser or page that Facebook finds disguising links that violate its Advertising Policies and/or Community Standards will be banned, the company said. Pages that don’t use cloaking shouldn’t be affected. Since going after cloaked links over the past few months, Facebook has fended off “thousands of these offenders,” according to the blog post.”

 

Click the image to read more from Facebook about its new process.

 

GOOGLE

As George Slefo reports for Advertising Age:

“Betty Crocker might want to check her inbox Thursday [last month]. The iconic brand is one of roughly a thousand online publishers were set to receive an email from Google warning them that they are showing ‘highly annoying, misleading, or harmful’ ads. Although there aren’t many ads on Betty Crocker’s Web site, it does have popups, especially on its mobile site. And that’s in violation of the Better Ads Standard, an industry effort born within the Coalition for Better Ads. Google is part of the Justice League-type group, as are Facebook, Procter & Gamble, Unilever, Washington Post,Interactive Advertising Bureau, ad-buying giant GroupM, Association of National Advertisers, and others. But Google carries particular weight because it’s the self-appointed hero that plans to block ‘annoying’ ads in its popular Chrome browser starting early next year.”

 

Credit: Illustration by Tam Nguyen/ Ad Age

 

Click here to access the site of the Coalition for Better Ads.

Click here to access Google’s Ad Experience Report tool.

 

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