Tag Archives: experiental marketing

Meet Pepper: The Humanoid Robot

15 Jul

As we have noted numerous times over the past few years, technology has been changing the face of business — for both small and large firms. So, are we ready for personalized robots taking our orders and payment at restaurants?

According to Maria LaMagna, reporting for MarketWatch:

“Soon, when restaurant-goers hear ‘May I take your order?’, those words may be coming from a robot. Some restaurants have started experimenting with human-like robots instead of human cashiers, allowing consumers to pay for their meals without interacting with another person. Although many restaurants have allowed digital ordering, either online, by kiosk, or on tablets at the table, the practice of using humanoid, or human-like robots, is still in its earliest stages, and it’s primarily happening in Asia so far. Experts say the robots could benefit restaurants and lead to wider adoption — if diners aren’t too freaked out by them.”

“Pizza Hut is the latest company to try a robot cashier, in a partnership with robotics company SoftBank Robotics and MasterCard, which has created the payment app. The application works only with MasterCard’s MasterPass, a digital wallet that allows payment by MasterCard cards, as well as credit, debit, or prepaid cards.”

“SoftBank’s robot is named Pepper. It has a face and can even respond to human customers with some emotional intelligence. For example, if a customer seems more tentative to interact with a robot, Pepper will be more reserved, whereas if a customer is more energetic, Pepper will be, too. It looks like an alien, with eyes and a touchscreen on its chest, and it’s the size of a small child.”

Here is a photo of Pepper from MasterCard. Below the photo, there is a fun YouTube video.
 

 

 

An In-Depth Infographic on Blogging

6 Jul

Thinking of starting or improving your own blog? Do you want your blog to go from good to great?

The Wise Startup Blog has developed a terrific infographic with more than one hundred ideas on developing and posting a blog. Take a look.

 


 

20 More New Apps to Check Out

28 Jun

Yesterday, we posted an infographic on Which Newer Apps Are Poised to Take Off? But, the apps cited there are by no means the only new apps to know about and consider utilizing.

Recently, The Guardian (a British publication) named other 20 new apps that are “coming to a screen near you.” Here is the list in alphabetical order):

  • Airtime “Created by Napster co-founder Sean Parker, this is a new spin on chats, using live video of you and up to five friends, while enabling you to pull in videos, music, and GIFs to share.”
  • Beme — “Launched by YouTube star Casey Neistat, this video-sharing app tries to make ‘honesty’ its virtue with an emphasis on unfiltered videos. You can’t review what you’ve shot before sharing it, but you can see people’s reactions.”
  • Flipagram — “A bit like Instagram, but with the ability to add music to photos and videos before sharing. Licensing deals mean the music is legit, and the app can share to Instagram and other social networks as well as its own community.”
  • FreshTeam — “As a messaging app for office teams, FreshTeam gets colleagues pinging messages back and forth, as well as jumping into voice calls and checking one another’s location on a map.”
  • Kimoji — “Kimoji has a stinking 2.5-out-of-5 stars rating on Apple’s app store, although it’s tempting to wonder how many people are reviewing its figurehead Kim Kardashian rather than the app. If you’ve ever wished there were more shoes, nails, and bottoms in your emoji keyboard, it’s worth a look.”
  • Miitomo — “Nintendo’s long-awaited first mobile app. It’s based on the company’s Mii avatars: you create a character and dress it up, insert it into photos, and send it off to interact with friends’ Miis.”
  • MSQRD  — “This app has made a smartphone craze out of ‘face-swapping,’  proving so popular that Facebook bought it. There are other ‘selfie animations’ to explore.”
  • Mush — “This is a location-based social app for mothers, helping them meet other parents in their area for messaging and playdates. It also offers advice on all things involving British motherhood.”
  • Musical.ly — “This is a social network for amateur music-video creators. It  is an app for making and sharing lip-sync videos with friends.”
  • Once — “Is modern dating just about swiping through dozens of  profiles looking for matches? Once is different, showing you a single match every day and giving you 24 hours to get in touch. Or not.”
  • Peach — “It’s about messaging friends, but also sending doodles, sharing music, and rating…  anything you like.”
  • QuizChat — “News site BuzzFeed’s quizzes are regularly shared on social networks, but its standalone QuizChat app aims to get you completing them with friends in pairs.”
  • Rando — “This sounds like a dreadful idea: pick a photo at random from your smartphone; then send it to a friend. You can also send GIFs or quotes. Its developer says he made it to make people think about what’s lurking in their camera rolls, and whether they’re happy to share it.”
  • Rapha RCC — “This is a social app for cyclists, tied to the Rapha Cycling Club. It costs £135 a year, with the app helping you see nearby rides with other members (and organise them yourself) as well as managing your profile and sharing bike talk.”
  • Shelfie — “Take a photo of your bookshelf and it’ll tell you which books are available as free (or at least discounted) E-books. It’s also a social reading network for chatting.”
  • Stylezz — “This is the latest in social fashion apps. You can browse the latest outfits from fashion bloggers by following their profiles, but you can also share photos of your own.”
  • Talkshow — “Subtitled ‘texting in public,’ this app aims to get people hosting virtual chatrooms about any topic they like, encouraging visitors to contribute their thoughts and images.”
  • Vidku — “It is entering a crowded market of video-sharing apps, but its selling point is control. You can share your clips publicly or in private groups, with the option to ‘unshare’ them from individual friends or whole groups whenever you want.”
  • WonderBox — “From children’s apps firm Duck Duck Moose, this is a social app designed to be used within families. That means private messaging between parents and children, and creative challenges to share.”
  • Yubl — “A UK social startup, this is another app with an emphasis on groups: friends, not co-workers in this case. It focuses on visuals created by you.”

 
Here is a video clip about Yubl.


 

The Dollar Shave Club Goes Humorous

17 Jun

Over the last several years, the Dollar Shave Club has revolutionized the way that shaving items are sold. Since its inception, the DSC has generated hundreds of millions of dollars in sales. And its success has generated new online competition, include the venerable Gillette brand — which now has its own online shave club: the Gillette Shave Club.

In response to the heightened competition, the DSC has just introduced a new, humorous advertising campaign.
 

 

Twitter Turns to Emojis to Boost Business

16 Jun

We have noted recently (1, 2) that emojis are gaining a much bigger role in marketing — both through videos and social media sites. Now, Twitter is hopping onto the emoji bandwagon.

As George Slefo reports for Advertising Age:

“Advertisers will either cry with laughter or happiness following Twitter’s announcement of emoji based-targeting. Its move precedes World Emoji Day [which is on July 17].”

“Advertisers can target consumers who have tweeted or engaged with tweets that feature emojis. Thus, someone in Chicago who tweets a pizza emoji can be targeted by a local restaurant to come in for a slice of deep dish.”

“More than 110 billion emojis have been tweeted since 2014, according to Twitter, which says they can signal a person’s mood or mindset.”

 
Click the emojis’ image to read more.


 

A Timeline on Advertising’s History

14 Jun

Here’s a question for YOU: When and where did the first print ads appear? 25 years ago? 50 years ago? 100 years ago? 200 years ago? How about more than 500 years ago in England (book ads tacked to church doors), as a HubSpot timeline shows.

As Jami Oetting writes for HubSpot:

“Many people believe that advertising has changed so much that looking toward the past is futile. Innovation, new technology and tools, and disrupting ideas are the focus of both headlines and boardroom conversations. What can we even learn from history that would be relevant for today?”

“Much of what makes a brand successful today is the same as it was 10, 50, and 100 years ago. The challenges that agencies help clients overcome are nothing novel. By understanding the past, we can more clearly understand what’s been done, what’s really ‘new,’ and the models we can emulate for future success. We can better understand why certain business practices exist, which provides context when making changes. It’s worth looking back to understand our current situation and how we can build a better industry for the future.”

 
Click the ad below from 1472 to access a fun and informative advertising timeline from HubSpot.


 

Part Two. Being Happier at Work: An Infographic

7 Jun

As we posted yesterday (“Part One. Being Happier in Life: An Infographic”), one of our key life goals should be happiness, a state of well-being and contentment. This applies to our work lives — not just our personal lives. So again, a good starting point is to ask ourselves how happy are we in our career path and in our current job? Do we understand our level of work-related happiness? What can we do to be happier at work?

According to Happify: “What do the people who are most satisfied with their jobs have in common? Learn these insider tips for being happier and more fulfilled during your 9 to 5.”

Check out the Happify infographic on happiness at work.
 

 

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