Tag Archives: experiental marketing

What People Want from Brands On Social Media

18 Jul

Last week, we posted about “Are You Always “On”? Living in a Connected World.” (1, 2, 3) As we noted, whether we are referring to companies’ behavior on social media or to our own efforts on social media, care must always be taken — and bad/inappropriate behavior avoided.

Consider these observations and charts from a study conducted by Sprout Social (“Bringing Businesses & People Closer Together”):

“Plenty of brands are doubling down on social snark [an attitude or expression of mocking irreverence and sarcasm] and reaping the benefits of more media visibility. But does this correlate to sales? To understand how brand personality impacts purchasing decisions, Sprout Social surveyed 1,000 consumers on which traits they want brands to demonstrate on social and what action specific brand responses such as humor or friendliness prompt.”

 

“The limelight most often falls on big brands with big social personalities, but what’s in it for the rest of us? While 75% of consumers believe there’s value in brands exhibiting humor on social, only 36% are willing to purchase from brands they believe are funny. And those brands have to bring it, because funny can quickly slide into annoying if not fresh, relevant, and interesting. That’s a big problem when 50% of consumers say they would unfollow a brand that annoyed them on social and 23% would walk away from your brand completely by vowing to never buy you again. Ouch.”

 

 

 

 

Click the image below for the full report.


 

True Fit’s “Shop for Others” App

29 Jun

We spend a lot of time (and money 🙂 ) shopping for others. Sometimes we enter the right information and sometimes we don’t. That’s why the gift receipt was invented for refunds. LOL.

Now, True Fit has devised a new app (“Shop for Others”) to make it easier to buy the right gift:

“Birthdays, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, back to school, the holidays; it seems like it’s always the season to shop for someone. For those of us who go out on a limb and buy footwear and apparel for friends and family, your online shopping experience just got a lot better. For those of you who opt for giving the gift card rather than an outfit because you’re not confident about the fit of clothes or shoes for others, you’re in luck. We’re happy to announce that purchasing apparel and footwear for friends and family just got a whole lot easier with True Fit’s newest feature, ‘Shop For Others.’”

Here’s how Shop for Others works:

Create and Save a Profile for a Family Member or Friend — Retailers who support this capability have the profile icon with a red ‘Plus Sign’ next to the standard True Fit recommendation. Shoppers are then prompted to fill in a few short questions about the person he or she is shopping for, which may include gender, height, weight, and a well-fitting or favorite piece of clothing in their closet, and it’s corresponding size and brand.  To complete the profile for improved fit accuracy, you can even fill in optional details, like stomach (Is it flat, average or round?), shoulders (are they narrow, average, or broad?), and torso (is it short, average or long?).”

 

Click the image to read more.


 

Better Understanding Returns of Online Purchases

13 Jun

Online retailers need to better deal with two key aspects of the customer purchase process: abandoning the shopping cart just before checking out and handling the returns of online purchases. This post focuses on the second factor — returns.

Navar surveyed almost 700 U.S. consumers who returned at least one online purchase over the preceding 12 months to understand people’s attitudes towards returns when shopping online. As summarized in a press release about the study:

“‘An online return is a critical moment in the customer journey. Retailers have an opportunity to impress and delight customers, especially high-value segments like millennials and affluent shoppers. They treat returns as a natural part of the buying process and have come to expect convenience and transparent communication,’ says Amit Sharma, CEO of Narvar. ‘If retailers can meet these high expectations, they can use returns to improve customer satisfaction, inspire loyalty and fuel new revenue streams.'”

“U.S. millennials make 54 percent of their purchases online. As they buy more online, they return more too. Yet, retailers are not meeting expectations, with 48 percent of millennials saying returns are a hassle. As many as 60 percent of millennials admit to keeping purchases they dislike because they don’t want to deal with the hassle of returning them, which is 18 percent higher than shoppers over the age of 30. High-income shoppers have similar perceptions and behaviors as millennials when it comes to returns. They are also 1.5 times more likely than the average consumer to return an online purchase. This signals a new opportunity for retailers to differentiate themselves by addressing consumers’ desire for convenience, communication and flexibility in the post-purchase experience.”

 

Click the image to read more of the highlights from the Narvar study.


 

Coming Up Short with Customer Loyalty Programs

9 Jun

As we have reported before (click here, for example): “The quest for customer loyalty continues to be both a critical goal and a major challenge for companies of all types and sizes.” Given the importance of customer loyalty, why don’t more firms do a better job with their loyalty programs?

According to eMarketer:

“Firms invest heavily in loyalty programs — a key part of their growth strategy to hook today’s fickle and disloyal consumers. More than four-fifths of consumers said such programs make them more likely to continue business with brands; two-thirds said they modify spending to maximize loyalty benefits; and nearly three-quarters said they would recommend brands with good programs, according to a recent Bond Brand Loyalty study, in partnership with Visa. (The annual study covered 400+ loyalty programs across industries and surveyed over 28,000 North American consumers who participate in at least one program, most in the U.S.)”

“However, the study also suggested that many marketers may not have gotten their loyalty programs right. While the number of loyalty memberships each American consumer belongs to has risen each year to 14+ from under 11 in 2014, the number of programs that consumers remain active in has declined to under 7 from about 8 in 2014. Only 22% of loyalty members feel their brand experience is better than that of non-member. With personalization being a big buzzword, only a quarter of loyalty members said they are happy with the level of personalization experience, the study found.”
 
 
Click the image to learn more.


 

What Will You Buy for Mom This Year?

4 May

According to the National Retail Federation, as reported by Ana Serafin Smith, Mother’s Day 2017 is expected to generate record revenues for retailers:

“Consumers say they will spend more than ever on Mother’s Day this year as they shower moms with everything from jewelry to special outings at favorite restaurants, according to the National Retail Federation’s annual survey conducted by Prosper Insights & Analytics. Mother’s Day shoppers are expected to spend an average of $186.39 for the holiday, up from last year’s $172.22. With 85 percent of consumers surveyed celebrating the holiday, total spending is expected to reach $23.6 billion. That’s the highest number in the survey’s 14-year history, topping last year’s previous record of $21.4 billion.”

“According to the survey, consumers plan to spend $5 billion on jewelry (purchased by 36 percent of shoppers), $4.2 billion on special outings such as dinner or brunch (56 percent), $2.6 billion on flowers (69 percent), $2.5 billion on gift cards (45 percent), $2.1 billion on clothing (37 percent), $2 billion on consumer electronics (15 percent), and $1.9 billion on personal services such as a spa day (24 percent).”

 
  What do YOU plan to give mom this year? 🙂


 
Check out this video from the NRF.


 

FORTY Facts on the Psychology of Color

5 Apr

Color is a very important component  of the marketer’s toolbox, as we have reported before (see 1, 2.)

Colin Cieloha of Skilled.co makes these observations:

“Are colors in business important? It is not something that I ever thought needed a serious consideration. I always thought that color was there to make things look pretty. Recent studies have proven that color can impact on behavior, thoughts, emotions, and even the subconscious decisions that we make. Color is a key tool that can be used for marketing purposes to drive sales and increase conversion rates.”

“Do you know that the reason why red is such a popular color choice for clearance sales is because it evokes a sense of urgency and can even raise our heart rate? The psychology of color is explored in an infographic from the team at Skilled.co which you can view in full below. Take a look and find out how color can boost your business.”

 

 

What’s Ahead for the Subscription Box Service?

13 Mar

Are subscription boxes a fad or sustainable business model? According to Jameson Morris, a specialist in the field: “A subscription box is a recurring, physical delivery of niche-oriented products packaged as an experience and designed to offer additional value on top of the actual retail products contained in a box.”

Morrison further notes that to be considered a subscription box service, these elements are needed: 

“Must be a physical delivery (digital subscriptions can’t be classified as a subscription box). 

Must be a recurring subscription/membership (of any term or frequency). 

Must feature one or more of the following value propositions:

Surprise (at least 1 or more items in the box must be unknown to the customer before delivery). Discovery (slightly different than ‘Surprise’. Discovery-oriented subscriptions don’t have to have ‘mystery’ items, it’s more about consumers ‘discovering’ items they’ve never seen before).

Curation (a thoughtfully picked variety of products related to a specific niche or category). 

Savings (a clear savings on the price paid for the box versus the total retail value of the items inside). 

Thoughtful Presentation (From custom packaging to the way products are arranged inside the box). 

Convenience (convenience cannot be implied solely by the fact that it’s a recurring ‘auto-delivery’. Rather, think of the fresh ingredient subscription boxes like Blue Apron or Green Chef–they deliver convenience in the form of pre-prepared ingredients and recipes).”

 

According to eMarketer:

“A March survey from AYTM Market Research of 1,000 US consumers showed that while a little over half of respondents said they have used at least one subscription service, almost two-fifths who had used one said they had canceled.”

“’To stay the distance, brands using a subscription model need a very strong point of difference and superior customer service,’ said Sarah Boumphrey, global lead of economies and consumers at Euromonitor International. She added that subscription services also need to come up with other avenues of revenue. For instance, Birchbox, a leader in the space, has brick-and-mortar stores.”

“Differentiation will be even more crucial, as there are signs that suggest the industry’s growth is slowing. Traffic to subscription service sites in January rose 18%, according to Hitwise. Though that’s healthy growth, it’s well off the 56% gain registered a year earlier.”

 
Click the image to read more.


 

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