Tag Archives: trends

Social Media Posts and Interaction: A HubSpot Study

28 Mar

How well do industries do in their social media engagement? Is the frequency of posting related to the level of audience participation? HubSpot recently conducted a research study on this (“2015 Social Media Benchmarks Report”). The full 49-page report may be accessed for FREE by filling out a simple form. THE RESULTS MAY SURPRISE YOU!!

As summarized by Ayaz Nanji, writing for MarketingProfs:

“Businesses that post more often to social media do not necessarily generate more engagement per post, according to a recent report from HubSpot. The report was based on HubSpot social media data for 7,000+ businesses in nine industries (real estate, healthcare, hardware, nonprofit/education, manufacturing, business/financial services, consumer goods/retail/E-commerce, marketing services, and software/technology).”

“There is no positive correlation with industries that publish more social media posts per week and interactions per post, the analysis found; in fact, there’s a very slight negative correlation. Businesses in the two industries that post the least (consumer goods/retail/E-commerce and manufacturing) have two of the highest interaction per post averages, whereas companies in the industry that posts the most (real estate) have the lowest number of interactions per post on average.”

Take a look at these three charts from HubSpot. Click them to read more at MarketingProfs.
 

 

 

 

The State of Wearable Technology

27 Mar

To date, the current popularity of wearable technology seems to be more of a company and media public relations campaign than based on actual sales revenues. In many cases, firms have not met their sales goals for the latest in wearable technology; and consumer interest is far less than expected. This is in some part due to consumers questioning whether they really need wearable technology when they have the most-advanced smartphones which are capable of doing so much.

Although some firms have succeeded with their wearable technology, Google has virtually withdrawn Google Glass from the marketplace. So, it will be interesting to see how Apple fares when it introduces its high-tech watch next month.


 
Take a look at the following infographic on wearable technology to see how far we have come in the last five-plus decades. The infographic is by Mashable.
 

 

2014 Global Patent Filings

21 Mar

According to the WIPO Web site:

“Intellectual property (IP) refers to creations of the mind, such as inventions; literary and artistic works; designs; and symbols, names, and images used in commerce. IP is protected in law by, for example, patents, copyright, and trademarks, which enable people to earn recognition or financial benefit from what they invent or create. By striking the right balance between the interests of innovators and the wider public interest, the IP system aims to foster an environment in which creativity and innovation can flourish.”

“The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) is the global forum for intellectual property policy, services, information and cooperation. A specialized agency of the United Nations, WIPO assists its 188 member states in developing a balanced international IP legal framework to meet society’s evolving needs. It provides business services for obtaining IP rights in multiple countries and resolving disputes. It delivers capacity-building programs to help developing countries benefit from using IP. And it provides free access to unique knowledge banks of IP information.”

Here is an infographic about global patent filings in 2014.
 
infographics_pct_2014
 

An Infographic Look at the Evolution of Web Design

16 Mar

Web design and the quality/features of Web sites have certainly come a long way over the last 25 years.

AmeriCommerce has put together an excellent infographic on the evolution of Web design:

“During the 25 years since the Internet entered our lives, change has been the only constant. And nowhere has that trend of ongoing change been more evident than in the world of Web design. We all know how important great design is today, but what did Web design look like in 1990? How has it changed over the years? And what can we expect to happen in coming years? We take a look at the history of Web design in our latest infographic.”

 
The History of Web Design
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Marketing Budgets Report 2015

6 Mar

Marketing budgets in 2015 are expected to grow, in some cases, for the first time in years.

As Nicola Cooper reports for Responsys:

“The Econsultancy Marketing Budgets Report 2015, created in association with Oracle Marketing Cloud, delves into marketers’ expected spend for the coming year and is a great opportunity to see whether you are facing similar challenges to the rest of the industry and inform your priorities for the year.”

“Because a customer’s decision to buy now involves many interactions with a brand, delivering an orchestrated approach is essential for any brand to attract and retain customers. It’s clear that our industry is aware of this; this year’s report indicates that nearly three quarters (74%) of the companies surveyed believe they are working towards delivering unified customer experiences, rather than standalone campaigns or interactions. In addition, 71% of the companies surveyed say that they are focusing on ‘breaking down internal silos to better co-ordinate and integrate [their] marketing efforts’. Marketers are unifying marketing strategy as well as unifying the marketing teams delivering those campaigns.”

“More generally, the findings also indicate that marketers are more likely to be increasing overall budgets for the year ahead than at any time since the launch of our first Marketing Budgets Report in 2010, during the height of the economic crisis. Winning areas include marketing technologies and digital marketing, as a result of stronger boardroom support.”

Click the image to read more.
 

 

Why Aren’t Wages Rising Faster?

4 Mar

Positive performance of the Gross Domestic Product? Check. Unemployment rate still dropping? Check. Energy prices down from last year? Check. (Despite some recent price increases). So, why haven’t U.S. wages risen faster and higher than they have?

Are wages finally ready to have a meaningful uptick? According to Knowledge@Wharton:

“An early spring looks in store for workers with unexpected good news from the U.S. Labor Department: In January, unemployment clocked in at 5.7%, down from a post-financial crisis high of 10% in October 2009. Over the last three months, employers hired at the fastest pace since 1997. Another positive sign: After years of stagnant wage growth, average hourly earnings rose by 0.5%, the biggest gain in six years.”

“Though small, this uptick in wage growth raises the question of whether economic recovery might finally bring higher pay along with it. In February, Wal-Mart Stores announced a pay raise for its U.S. workers to $10 an hour, above the $7.25 an hour federal minimum wage, and other companies, such as Starbucks, Panera Bread, and Aetna have also raised wages at the lower rungs. That’s good news, when average real wage growth has hovered around zero among developed countries since the end of the financial crisis, according to a 2014 report by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, the International Labor Organization and the World Bank Group. G-20 countries overall have averaged only 1% to 2% real wage growth a year, most due to wage increases in China, according to the report.”

“Workers should remain skeptical of any dramatic change afoot on the wage front, however. The economic recovery taking hold at least in the U.S., if not in other major developed economies, may enable workers to claw back jobs, but dramatically higher pay is a much more tenuous prospect. The availability of still more U.S. workers on the sidelines ready for hire, along with an eager supply outside the U.S., continued displacement of workers via technology, and weaker worker protections in the law will allow employers to hold the upper hand for some time to come, experts say.”

Click the image to read more.
 

 

A Beginner’s Guide to Keyword Research for Search Engine Optimization (SEO)

3 Mar

An important goal for ANY firm involved with the Internet and social media is to gain the best possible search engine placement (SEO).

For those new to SEO, Rachel Sprung — writing for HubSpot — offers some basic tips:

“While Google keeps us on our toes with all the algorithm updates they keep rollin’ out, one thing has stayed pretty consistent for inbound marketers looking to optimize their Web sites for search: keyword research. Well, the need to do keyword research has stayed the same. How you actually do it hasn’t.”

“So I’m going to lay out a keyword research process you can follow to help you come up with and narrow down a list of terms you should be targeting.That way, you’ll be able to establish and execute a strong keyword strategy that helps you get found for the search terms you actually care about.”

Click the image to read about Sprung’s easy approach.
 

 

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