Tag Archives: trends

Valentine’s Day Not Only Means Love. It Also Means $$$ for Firms

12 Feb

The National Retail Federation reports that Valentine’s Day 2016 will generate almost $20 billion in sales: According its “Valentine’s Day Consumer Spending Survey conducted by Prosper Insights and Analytics, 54.8 percent of consumers will celebrate Valentine’s Day, spending an average of  $146.84 on flowers, jewelry, candy, apparel, and more, up from $142.31 last year.”

Here are some more Valentine’s Day facts, as reported by About.com:

  • “As usual, men spend nearly twice as much as women: $196.39 per guy v.s. $99.87 per gal.”
  • “Those making $50,000 a year or more will spend $169.32 each, vs $109.14 per person making less than $50,000.”
  • “Younger people participate more than older, more settled folks. Nearly two-thirds of those between 25-34 will celebrate the holiday, and 60% of those between 18-24. Less than half of those between 55-64 will celebrate, and only 44.7% of those 65 and older.”
  • “The least popular gifts are also the least romantic. Only 17% will buy clothing, spending $87.37 each, and 15% will buy gift cards, spending $81.20 each.”
  • “For the first time, more will go to department stores (35%) than discount stores (31%). Nearly 20% will go to greeting card stores or florists, while only 11% will go to jewelers. Retailers have stocked the shelves with deals in anticipation of value-conscious shoppers.”

 
Here are the top items purchased for Valentine’s Day. Click the image to read more from About.com.

Val Day
 

More Than 25% of Super Bowl Advertisers Will Be Newbies

29 Jan

Now, that we (about 120 million U.S. viewers) are about 10 days from Super Bowl 50, the advertising picture is becoming clearer. And after all, this is the “Super Bowl” of advertising with 30-second commercials going for $5 million or so (just for air time).

What is especially interesting about the 50th anniversary Super Bowl is how many companies will be advertising for the first time. As reported by Jeanine Poggi for Advertising Age:

“The usual advertising stalwarts will certainly be on hand for Super Bowl 50, but so will plenty of newbies. Longtime advertisers like Budweiser and Coca-Cola will share the stage with brands like Amazon, Colgate, and Marmot, which are all making their Super Bowl debuts. Overwhelmingly, the marketers making their Super Bowl debuts have one goal in mind — to build brand awareness.”

“There are currently 13 confirmed marketers that will air commercials in the big game for the first time, up from 10 in 2015. Already, that figure would make Super Bowl 50 the third most popular game for new advertisers since such stats began being tracked. There were 19 first-timers in 2000 and 14 in 1999, according to Kantar Media, which has tracked the Super Bowl since 1988.”

Click the image to see the 13 newbies.


 
And here’s a YouTube video for the ad of one newcomer.
 

 

TIAA-CREF’s Chief Economist: Four 2016 Video Forecasts

26 Jan

TIAA-CREF, the full-service investment firm that manages nearly $835 billion in assets, recently produced a series of short videos about the year ahead (2016) featuring its Chief Economist Tim Hopper. 
 

1. The U.S. economy should accelerate modestly this year.

 

2. Fed rate hikes could stimulate economic growth this year.

 

3. The U.S. economy is on a path toward sustainable growth in 2016.

 

4. China’s slowdown puts a damper on global growth.

 

Want to Attract the Health-Conscious Consumer?

22 Jan

This television interview of Hofstra University’s Professor Joel Evans (of the Zarb School of Business) recently appeared on Fios1’s Money & Main$treet program. The interview was conducted by host Giovanna Drpic. It deals with catering to consumers who are interested in a healthy lifestyle. There are many tips and graphics.
 

 

Are You Ready for a Months-Long Job Interview?

20 Jan

We know that the job hiring process is much tougher today than in the past — due to companies’ use of key-word computer software to pre-screen resumes, the downsizing of several major companies, and the number of applicants for each good job. But, another disheartening trend for job seekers is the longer hiring process used by many firms. Job seekers must be ready to deal with these trends without getting overly frustrated by them. A positive attitude, and endurance, are essential.

For example, in  today’s print version of the Wall Street Journal, Sue Shellenbarger’s report is titled “The Six-Month Job Interview”:

“It has never been easy to land a job, but a rise in hiring has added a new twist: Employers are taking nearly twice as long to hire people as they did several years ago. ​Companies need an average of 23 days to screen and hire new employees, up from 13 days in 2010, says Andrew Chamberlain, chief economist at the jobs and recruiting site Glassdoor, based on a study of nearly 350,000 interview reviews by the site’s users. Applicants run a gantlet of multiple interviews not only with bosses but with teams of prospective co-workers. Also, more people are being asked to submit business plans or face a battery of personnel tests.” [Click here to access the full Glassdoor report.]

“For job seekers, performing well during decision-making marathons requires a thick skin and new skills. Some get frustrated or blame themselves for delays in the hiring process. ‘It can be debilitating. It goes on and on,’ says Carole Osterer, Wayland, Mass., who completed a job search late last year. A human-resources manager at one employer called her with glowing comments. A month later, he called to say the company wasn’t interested after all. After another month, he reversed himself again and asked her to interview, says Ms. Osterer, a university research administrator. She did the interviews but never heard from the employer again.”

 

To read more about the elongated job search process (and see more tips like those below), click the image.

“HURDLE: Long silences between interviews are making you crazy. DO: Suppress your frustration and find a friendly way to stay in touch, such as sending an article of interest. DON’T: Call HR and demand to know your status.” Illustration: Tim Bower for The Wall Street Journal

 

Looking for a Job in Marketing Or Public Relations?

18 Jan

As we embark on the year 2016, it is a good time to be looking for a job in marketing and public relations.

As Clare Lane reports for PR Daily:

“The demand for marketing, creative, digital, and communications professionals is on the rise — and so is the price for new hires.”

The “Paladin Blog notes, as the opportunities for marketing professionals evolve, it’s important to note how much organizations are willing to pay for in-demand skills. In addition, employers are seeking professionals with a capacity to add new skills. This year, job seekers can expect to see employers express interest in adaptability, creativity and digital marketing. Because of technology, social media, shifting consumer behavior, and marketing’s increased role in customer service, these professionals need to be agile, adaptable, and always willing to learn. And because of those same things — along with high-demand for their skills—they can be selective with their career steps and expect to make generous salaries.”

 
Click here to see Paladin’s top ten creative/marketing jobs (and their average salaries) for 2016.
 

And click the image for specific companies with marketing jobs as of January 2016.

 

Where Is Wearable Technology Headed in 2016?

12 Jan

Over the last couple of years, there has been a flood of wearable technology — from smart watches to pure activity trackers such as Fitbit. So, what’s likely to happen in 2016?

Here are 2016 predictions from James A. Martin, writing for CIO.com:

  • “The popularity of wearables will continue to mount.”
  • “Smartwatches won’t kill off dedicated activity trackers.”
  • “Fitbit will remain king of the activity trackers. [But] Competition will heat up for Fitbit.”
  • “Fitbit will add ‘advanced sensors’ to maintain a competitive edge.”
  • “Wearable apps will become more sophisticated — and expensive.”
  • “Hackers will target wearables.”
  • “Athletes will embrace ‘smart clothing’.”
  • There will be more of a “focus on sleep.”
  • “Niche wearables will become commonplace.”
  • “Activity trackers will remind more people to stand up.”
  • “Traditional watch makers will add ‘smart’ elements.”

Click here to read a lot more from Martin.
 

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