Tag Archives: trends

Want to Perform at the Super Bowl? Pay for Play May Be Coming

21 Aug

Most of us already know that the National Football League is the most popular and profitable sports entity in the United States — by a wide margin. NFL prime-time TV games are regularly the highest-rated shows of the week. Advertising, sponsorship, and licensing contracts with the NFL amount to billions of dollars a year. Super Bowl ads cost well over $4 million per 30 seconds. The 2014 Super Bowl halftime show with Bruno Mars and the Red Hot Chili Peppers  attracted more than 115 million viewers.

The author of this blog has frequently gotten into debates with friends who cannot believe that artists such as Beyoncé, the Rolling Stones, and Paul McCartney have not been paid for performing at the Super Bowl halftime show. But it’s always been true. In the past, the NFL has contributed to the expenses associated with putting on the halftime show.

Now, according to the Wall Street, the ever-audacious NFL may be going even further in its revenue quest. As Rachel Feintzeig and Joann S. Lublin report:

“The National Football League doesn’t usually pay the act that performs at halftime during the Super Bowl. But in a twist this year, the league has asked artists under consideration for the high-profile gig to pay to play, according to people familiar with the matter. The NFL has narrowed down the list of potential performers for the 2015 Super Bowl to three candidates: Rihanna, Katy Perry, and Coldplay, these people said. While notifying the artists’ camps of their candidacy, league representatives also asked at least some of the acts if they would be willing to contribute a portion of their post-Super Bowl tour income to the league, or if they would make some other type of financial contribution, in exchange for the halftime gig.”

“The show has always been among the most valuable promotional opportunities for the music industry, and in recent years, some performers have put tickets for their tours on sale immediately following their appearance on the field, to capitalize on the exposure. Beyoncé announced her ‘Mrs. Carter Show’ tour immediately following her halftime performance in 2013, for example, and the world tour grossed more than any other that year besides Bon Jovi’s, according to trade publication Pollstar. Bruno Mars also put tickets to his ‘Moonshine Jungle’ tour on sale the Monday after the game this year.”

The Wall Street Journal image below has some interesting data.

 

Source: Nielsen. Image by Wall Street Journal

 

What Binge Viewers Want

14 Aug

In recent years, due to the widespread availability of DVRs and on-demand programs, more people have been engaging in “binge” viewing — whereby they watch multiple episodes of a program (typically, a series) at one time.

Marketers need to understand this new segment of binge viewer and respond to the desires of this segment.

Consider these observations from eMarketer:

“Ever sat down to watch an episode of a TV show and gotten sucked in for hours on end? That’s called binge-viewing, and a May 2014 study by Annalect — which defined binge-viewing as watching three or more episodes of the same television show in one setting — found that 63% of U.S. TV watchers ages 18 and older fell into this category (though just 30% actually said so).”

“Those who did binge-view voiced a strong aversion to advertisements during their TV time, with 58% saying they liked binge-viewing because they didn’t have to watch ads. A close 57% said ads prevented them from fully enjoying their TV shows, and 53% didn’t think that commercials even had a place in the binge-viewing world.”

 

Click the chart to read more.

 

 

Be a Smarter Tourist: Avoid These Scams

13 Aug

It is currently the height of the tourist season in many countries. As such, smart tourists must be aware of — and protect themselves against — the numerous scams that are out there.

As UK-based Just the Flight puts it:

“Tourists are often the most vulnerable to scams; they are probably unfamiliar with the surrounding area; they are often in need of help and information and tend to be trusting of locals; they are likely not to question what they see or are told; they often cannot speak the language where they are; and they are probably carrying large amounts of cash and credit.”

“Most scammers are smart. They know how to cheat money out of tourists in ways that make identification difficult, if not impossible. Some scams are quite obvious once they have occurred, with the victim realizing they have been cheated but only after it is too late. Others are more subtle, where the victim may never realize that anything went wrong, and they rationalize that they have either lost of miscounted their money. Tourist scammers and pickpockets take advantage of weak laws and law enforcement, thereby allowing them to effectively operate indefinitely while nothing is stopping them.”

Take a look at this infographic from Just the Flight and avoid the worst tourist scams.
 

 

Tips for Using Microcontent in Social Media Marketing

10 Aug

The latest new term for our bulging marketing dictionary is “microcontent.” According to Danyl Bosomworth (co-founder of Smart Insights and Managing Director of First 10 Digital):

“Essentially, microcontent is as it sounds – short form content. Typically low-cost, high-value content appropriate to social channels. To all intents and purpose it’s social media content. It’s not that detailed articles or long form, rich content are any less important, it’s simply a case of being relevant to the social media platform in question, and accessible to an ever detached consumer who’s on the move with a low attention span for your brand. “

And as Stephanie Castillo, in a multimedia format, writes for Visual.ly:

“There are many ways that brands are leveraging Vine as a piece of their marketing strategy. But despite this, most brands have not yet figured out how to include Vines within their overall strategic vision. To do that you’ll need to take a step back and consider why you are producing this type of content in the first place. What purpose does it serve? Can you use it as collateral? Will it strengthen your brand’s story and identity? Will it resonate with your audience enough to compel them to share with their networks?”

Castillo offers several suggestions (with examples of each):

  1. Entertain
  2. Educate
  3. Provide tutorials
  4. Make announcements
  5. Build hype

Take a look at the video to learn more.
 

 

B2B Firms and Online Content Marketing

31 Jul

Clearpoint Agency, an award-winning public relations firm, has studied the online practices of business-to-firms.

In the following infographic, Clearpoint “describes why marketers create content, how they use content, and where they post content. The best business-to-business content marketing practices and most popular tactics are outlined in this fun and informative infographic!”
 

 

How Brands Can Do Better on Vine

25 Jul

Vine is “the best way to see and share life in motion. Create short, beautiful, looping videos in a simple and fun way for your friends and family to see.” It has about 50 million users, many of whom are teenagers, who are attracted to the six-second videos.

Stephanie Castillo, a digital marketing specialist at Visually, reports that:

“Given its accessibility and low cost, this form of micro-content gives marketers a chance to get some hands-on video production experience. But don’t be fooled: though the app promotes a quick and raw form of capturing video, you shouldn’t take this as a cue to wander away from quality content. Rather, the stakes for a quality video with a strong story are now higher, simply because you have an ever shorter amount of time to get your point across.”

“By now, brands have had the chance to explore the many possibilities with Vine. Let’s take a closer look at five brands that are leveraging Vine in a smart, impactful way for some inspiration on creating micro-videos that capture the attention of your audience.”

Click the image to read Castillo’s multimedia article about Tribeca Film Festival: Contests, General Electric: Corporate Campaigns, Nissan: Product Highlight, USA Today: Narrative, and Lowe’s: DIY and Useful Information.
 

 

Business Career Tips and Resources

21 Jul

In the slideshow presented below, learn about many of the opportunities and challenges facing those interested in a field of business.

The latest data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics are included.
 

 

Global Advertising Is Booming

20 Jul

As part of its research on worldwide advertising trends, eMarketer examined the per-capita ad spending for several countries around the globe.

From this research, a few conclusions may be drawn: (1) From 2012 to 2018, advertising is expected to rise sharply in many of the countries eMarketer examined. (2) The United States and 7 other countries will see per-capita ad spending exceed annually by 2018. (3) Even though ad spending will rise substantially in the world’s two most populous countries — China and India, per-capita ad spending through 2018 will remain low compared with other nations. (4) Most of the increases will be driven by a shift to digital media.

Click the chart to learn more.
 

 

The Changing Constants of Marketing (No, This Is Not an Oxymoron)

18 Jul

We’ve written a lot about the rapidly changing world of marketing — with the advances in social media, technology, big data, etc. So, sometimes, we need to pause and reflect on things that are the constants in marketing.

In 1966, McKinsey published an article by John D. Louth on “The Changing Face of Marketing”: “This article from the McKinsey Quarterly archive analyzes six major changes that promised to transform future marketing efforts. These forces have largely proved to be as influential as predicted and continue to shape today’s challenges.”

The six major changes — which are really marketing constants — are as relevant today as they were nearly 50 years ago:

  1. The dominance of the customer — “It is nearly a truism that the needs and wants of the consumer are the critical issues today in creating new products and services, and developing the accompanying plans to merchandise them at a profit.”
  2. The spread of marketing research — “The second trend is the increased use of marketing research — in terms of both quantity and scope. To an important degree, of course, this trend is a response to the first. If knowledge about future customers is essential, and if the quality of the marketing output is materially affected by the caliber of the informational input, then marketing research is bound to increase in use and contribution as the interest in more scientific marketing grows.”
  3. The rise of the computer — “The third major trend marketing must consider is the emergence of electronic data-processing equipment as a major tool of scientific marketing not only for reporting data but also, more importantly, for planning and control by management.”
  4. Expanded use of test marketing — “A fourth important trend, in my opinion, will be toward more controlled experimentation to narrow the odds of an error in making marketing changes. Two major influences emphasize the need for further expansion of test marketing. The first is the rising cost of marketing changes: the costs, for example, of introducing new products and packaging, of developing new advertising and promotional programs, and of retraining salespeople. The second influence is the mounting investment in product research and development. About half of all corporate research-and-development activity in the United States today is concerned with the creation of new commercial products.”
  5. Metamorphosis of field selling — “The fifth trend I foresee is a shift in the nature of the field-selling job toward a more integrated, profit-oriented marketing effort. Key-account selling is becoming an increasingly crucial feature of the field-sales job—a trend with important implications. In many companies, a key-account selling program may entail special analysis of present and potential customers, and the establishment of related control reports to measure profit results with particular accounts.”
  6. Global market planning — “An ever-broadening application of the marketing concept to worldwide markets is the last of the six broad trends that I believe will change the face of marketing in the next few years. Over the past decade, the marketing concept has become widely accepted in the United States—perhaps, in some situations, too enthusiastically accepted and too indiscriminately applied. Nevertheless, I believe the concept of a completely integrated marketing effort is valid and will be increasingly adopted. In many companies operating worldwide, it will stimulate the development of global market planning.”

Click the image to read the full classic article.
 

 

An Interview with Fashion Legend Diane Von Furstenberg

17 Jul

Diane Von Furstenberg has been a prominent, trend-setting fashion designer for decades. Take a look at the Web site of her company to see what she’s doing now.

Here’s a brief bio of Von Furstenberg by Liz Welch of Inc.:

“Designer Diane von Furstenberg was 27 when she made the first wrap dress in 1974. The iconic design landed her on the cover of Newsweek — and millions of women snapped up her dresses. But when demand faded, von Furstenberg ended up selling most of her licenses to avoid bankruptcy. In 1997, von Furstenberg relaunched her company, which now has annual sales of more than $200 million. The wrap dress, too, made a comeback, and recently celebrated its 40th anniversary with ‘The Journey of the Dress’ exhibition, which traveled the globe. And, as the 68-year-old designer recently shared with Inc. contributing editor Liz Welch, she is focused on building a company to outlast any fad.”

Click Von Furstenberg’s photo to read her recent interview with Liz Welch for Inc.
 

 

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