Tag Archives: social media

Snapchat Hits Three: Here’s an Infographic Timeline

28 Sep

It has certainly been an interesting ride for Snapchat since its September 2011 founding: “Enjoy fast and fun mobile conversation! Snap a photo or a video, add a caption, and send it to a friend. They’ll view it, laugh, and then the Snap disappears.”

Here is a detailed infographic timeline of Snapchat by DPFOC Online Marketing.
 

 

Capitalizing on the Power of Social Media Review Sites

23 Sep

We have written a lot about the power of social media — both good and bad. For example, see these recent posts: 1, 2, 3. So, what more can we do to capitalize on the power of social media review sites?

According to Paula Andruss, writing for Entrepreneur, there are six things to consider doing:

  1. Develop a detail-loaded presence. “Whether you’re initiating a new profile or ‘claiming’ one that’s already on the Web, it’s important to fill out your listing as fully and accurately as possible. To optimize your SEO, it is important to have one standard and accurate listing on every site that mentions your company; if your listing varies among sites, it may be pushed down in search results.”
  2. Read the fine print. “Michael Dash, president of New York-based CarPartKings.com, relies heavily on review sites to validate his company and let users know what to expect from his service. But after purchasing a yearly program with an industry-specific ratings site, he found that as traffic to his E-commerce business increased, so did the charges to keep the reviews coming — rising from $50 per month to $1,000. Within a day of refusing to pay the increased rate, all of his positive reviews disappeared, while the negative ones remained. ‘We learned our lesson the hard way,’ Dash says.”
  3. Accrue reviews and keep them fresh. “Establishing a listing is not enough; you need to solidify your presence by gathering as many reviews as possible. While the algorithms used to determine your company’s placement on these sites is mysterious at best, having a greater number of reviews can improve your landing results over competitors on the results page of a local search.”
  4. Avoid filter triggers. “One of the biggest frustrations with review sites is that they can (and do) filter legitimate reviews so that they may be hard to find — or even removed — based on individual site parameters. Yelp’s policy states that it will filter reviews it believes have been solicited. Yelp and other sites also commonly filter comments from people who have written only a single review; those that are too glowing, which may appear fake; and even those that are too negative, because they may have been written by a competitor.”
  5. Respond carefully to bad or false reviews. “Poor reviews can hurt, but it’s important to respond in a calm and professional manner. Factually incorrect reviews are another problem, but the complaint system to have them removed is difficult and often unsuccessful. So it may be preferable to simply continue to collect reviews so that the questionable ones are outweighed.”
  6. Invest wisely. “As long as your business is operating smoothly, consider enlisting the help of services that might make these sites work better for you. For example, Bazaarvoice Express automatically requests reviews from customers that can be posted on your site, and Moz has a tool that will standardize local listings on major aggregators for about $50 per year.”

Click the image to read the full article by Andruss.
 

 Image credit: Theispot.com/Leon Mussche

 

Are Microsoft and Minecraft a Good Fit?

17 Sep

Mojang, the maker of the highly popular Minecraft video game, has reached an agreement to be acquired by Microsoft. The purchase price is $2.5 billion. The deal is important to both Mojang and Microsoft, the maker of Xbox.

As Mojang posted at its Web site:

“Yes, we’re being bought by Microsoft. Yes, the deal is real. Mojang is being bought by Microsoft. It was reassuring to see how many of your opinions mirrored those of the Mojangstas when we heard the news. Change is scary, and this is a big change for all of us. It’s going to be good though. Everything is going to be OK. Please remember that the future of Minecraft and you – the community – are extremely important to everyone involved. If you take one thing away from this post, let it be that. We can only share so much information right now, but we’ve decided that being as honest as possible is the best approach. We’re still working a lot of this stuff out. Mega-deals are serious business.”

And in this YouTube video, head of Xbox Phil Spencer discusses Microsoft’s acquisition of Minecraft and Microsoft’s respect and admiration for the Minecraft community.
 

 
But, when the acquisition  is completed, the hard part starts — blending the Mojang culture with that of Microsoft. As Evelyn M. Rusli and Shira Ovide write for the Wall Street Journal: 

News that Microsoft is acquir[ing] Swedish company Mojang AB up a clash of cultures between the corporate giant and Minecraft loyalists — spanning from middle-school children to video-game diehards. To many of its fans, Mojang’s antiestablishment swagger has always been part of Minecraft’s mystique. Mojang, which has only about 40 employees, is run by programmer Markus Persson, who has gained a cult following by publicly blasting big tech companies, including Microsoft, Electronic Arts, and Facebook.  Microsoft, pushing 40 and worth about $387 billion, is seen as the software industry’s Goliath.”

“Already, there are signs that a Minecraft game under Microsoft will be different. According to people with knowledge of the matter, Mr. Persson is expected to leave Mojang if Microsoft completes a deal. The company’s game-development office in Stockholm isn’t expected to move or close, a person familiar with the deal negotiations said. On online forums such as Reddit and Twitter, many players questioned whether a sale would destroy the game’s indie spirits. ‘Why pay $2.5 billion for something just to alienate all the fans?’ wrote a Reddit user who goes by the handle Joebovi.”

 
 What do YOU think?
 

Social Media Maturity: An MIT Infographic

9 Sep

Some firms and individuals have reached a level of maturity with their use of social media — based on their levels of experience and activity. Others are still at the early or developing stages of social media use.

Recently, MIT’s Sloan Management Review did a global study on this topic: “The findings from our July 2014 global study on social business indicated that ‘social business maturity’ is related to the level of results that companies achieve. A new infographic illustrates how social business creates value, and outlines the primary drivers for companies seeking to advance toward social business maturity.”

Here is that infographic.
 

 

New Ways to Optimize SEO

4 Sep

Search engine optimism remains a big challenge for many firms and individuals.

With this in mind, consider these observations by Drew Hendricks, writing for Scoop.it!:

“SEO has become a cornerstone in content marketing campaigns as businesses look to establish a presence on the Internet. However, SEO is about more than just making sure you have the appropriate keywords placed in landing pages and blog posts. Search engines are getting smarter – specifically Google – which is constantly trying to keep the playing field leveled with every new update. Google’s goal is to ensure that Web surfers are getting quality results each time they submit a search query, and you need to keep these guidelines in mind to make sure your company site actually reaches your target audience. That being said, it helps to know how to optimize your SEO strategy to make sure that you’re always tapping into the potential of the Web.”

Here are Huff’s 8 tools to help optimize sites for higher search engine listings:

  1. Free Keyword Tool from Wordstream
  2. Moz Pro
  3. SEObin.org
  4. Majestic SEO
  5. FeedTheBot.com
  6. Google’s Keyword Planner
  7. Snippet Optimizer
  8. Pingdom

Click the image to read more from Huff.

Tumblr Acquisition Seems to be Working for Yahoo — If It Could Only Sell Ads

30 Aug

Yahoo and CEO Marissa Mayer, who joined Yahoo from Google in July 2012, have had a difficult time making the firm more dynamic in today’s marketplace. However, 2013 acquisition Tumblr may be turning out to be wise strategic move. But its impact on Yahoo’s ad revenues is still in question.

What is Tumblr? According to its Web site: “Tumblr lets you effortlessly share anything. Post text, photos, quotes, links, music, and videos from your browser, phone, desktop, email or wherever you happen to be. You can customize everything, from colors to your theme’s HTML.” As of now, there have been 833 billion posts across 200 million blogs at Tumblr.

New research from eMarketer sheds light on how rapidly Tumblr is growing and is expected to grow:

“Tumblr continues to gain popularity in the U.S., with the number of users increasing 46.2% in 2013, totaling 13.7 million internet users, according to new figures from eMarketer – our first-ever forecast of Tumblr usage. Usage of the Yahoo-owned social blogging platform will increase by nearly another 25% in 2014, according to our estimates, totaling more than 17.1 million internet users this year. Growth in the number of users who access their Tumblr accounts each month will taper off into the single digits by 2017, when the user base totals 22.8 million users, or 12.0% of all social networkers in the U.S.”

Nonetheless, “questions have hovered around the site’s value to the internet giant, and whether its youthful user base can inject life into Yahoo’s declining display advertising business.”

 Click on the image to read more.
 

 

Want to Perform at the Super Bowl? Pay for Play May Be Coming

21 Aug

Most of us already know that the National Football League is the most popular and profitable sports entity in the United States — by a wide margin. NFL prime-time TV games are regularly the highest-rated shows of the week. Advertising, sponsorship, and licensing contracts with the NFL amount to billions of dollars a year. Super Bowl ads cost well over $4 million per 30 seconds. The 2014 Super Bowl halftime show with Bruno Mars and the Red Hot Chili Peppers  attracted more than 115 million viewers.

The author of this blog has frequently gotten into debates with friends who cannot believe that artists such as Beyoncé, the Rolling Stones, and Paul McCartney have not been paid for performing at the Super Bowl halftime show. But it’s always been true. In the past, the NFL has contributed to the expenses associated with putting on the halftime show.

Now, according to the Wall Street, the ever-audacious NFL may be going even further in its revenue quest. As Rachel Feintzeig and Joann S. Lublin report:

“The National Football League doesn’t usually pay the act that performs at halftime during the Super Bowl. But in a twist this year, the league has asked artists under consideration for the high-profile gig to pay to play, according to people familiar with the matter. The NFL has narrowed down the list of potential performers for the 2015 Super Bowl to three candidates: Rihanna, Katy Perry, and Coldplay, these people said. While notifying the artists’ camps of their candidacy, league representatives also asked at least some of the acts if they would be willing to contribute a portion of their post-Super Bowl tour income to the league, or if they would make some other type of financial contribution, in exchange for the halftime gig.”

“The show has always been among the most valuable promotional opportunities for the music industry, and in recent years, some performers have put tickets for their tours on sale immediately following their appearance on the field, to capitalize on the exposure. Beyoncé announced her ‘Mrs. Carter Show’ tour immediately following her halftime performance in 2013, for example, and the world tour grossed more than any other that year besides Bon Jovi’s, according to trade publication Pollstar. Bruno Mars also put tickets to his ‘Moonshine Jungle’ tour on sale the Monday after the game this year.”

The Wall Street Journal image below has some interesting data.

 

Source: Nielsen. Image by Wall Street Journal

 

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