Tag Archives: promotion

The Promotion Value of Store Window Displays

17 Mar

Window displays can play a large role in generating the enthusiasm and browsing behavior of shoppers. Great displays can generate store traffic that would otherwise be lacking.

As Barry Rice writes for ShutterCo, a leading provider of shutters in Dublin, Ireland:

“Some fashion brands have gained a reputation for their impressive window displays, most notably high-end brands like Louis Vuitton and Chanel. They go the extra mile when it comes to attracting shopper’s attention.Whether they have effective storyline type displays or they simply let colors or their clothes do the talking, these brands ensure they turn heads with their window displays.”

“It can be a task to get window displays right. In fact, window dressing is an art in itself which requires a lot of experience and of course, attention to detail. In our infographic we outline some of the most impressive window displays over the past few years that have rocked the world of retail. We provide details on each: what is depicted in the display, where it is located, and why is it so effective.These inspiring designs will make you look at window displays in a whole new light — from Bergdorf Goodman to Chanel to Apple.”

“See how visual merchandising is done right with our insightful info graphic on ‘The Art of Window Displays.’ Enjoy!

 

The_Art_of_Window_Displays-Infographic
 

Do People Still Look at Banner Ads? A Humorous View

20 Feb

Each year, marketer spend millions of dollars on banner ads. With that in mind, a good question is: Do people actually look at these ads?

Recently, Canadian-based Prestige Marketing prepared a brief tongue-in-cheek infographic addressing the above question:

“Banner ads first appeared on the Web in 1994 and since then they have been used extensively over the Internet. They are made to be eye catching and impressive so that they create an urge in the visitors to click into their business. But, their mass production and misuse has caused viewers to be skeptical and unresponsive to them. Do people still fall for this attractive ad?”

 

 

What Are the Best Ways to Influence People?

20 Jan

Persuasion is a key skill for marketers to master — not manipulation but honesty-based persuasion.

As Emma Snider writes for HubSpot:

“To sell something, you have to convince a buyer that they not only want your offering, they need it. To be clear, I’m not talking about fooling them into buying a piece of junk. Oftentimes, prospects stand to benefit considerably from purchasing a new product or service.”

“Most salespeople swear by personal persuasion tactics that ‘just work.’ But what does science have to say about it? After researching scientific studies on tactics that prompt people to act in a certain way, the folks at Everreach put together the infographic shown below. Instead of deciding which method of persuasion to use based on gut feel, salespeople can now consult the science before proceeding. So before your next meeting or call, think: Which of these six tactics would hold the most sway over this particular buyer? Adjust your approach accordingly and you’ll have them signing on the dotted line in no time. It’s not magic; it’s science.”

 

 

Be Better Prepared for Chinese Media

30 Dec

Are you doing business in China? Do you understand the special dimensions of utilizing Chinese media?

Glenn Leibowitz of McKinsey & Company offers us 10 tips for dealing with Chinese media:

1. Global news penetrates Chinese media very quickly. “Chinese media follow international media very closely. They’ll pick up stories and translate them on the same day they appear in a major international news outlet.”

2. Media are censored. “Even more commercially-oriented media outlets still need to run their stories through the vast government censorship apparatus.”

3. Media like stories aligned with the government’s economic agenda. “Stories seen as supporting the government’s economic narrative  have a higher chance of landing on the pages of a publication or Web site.”

4. There are three “flavors” of written Chinese. “In Mainland China, media use the ‘simplified’ Chinese character set, which contains many characters that differ in how they’re written in Hong Kong and Taiwan, which use the ‘traditional’, or ‘complex’, character set. And Hong Kong does not use exactly the same set of characters that Taiwan uses, resulting in three different ‘flavors’ of written Chinese across the region.”

5. Editorial standards are rising fast. “While some reporters still publish a cut-and-paste version of your press release, Chinese media  —  both frontline journalists and their editors back at the bureau  —  are getting more demanding when it comes to determining what meets their bar for news.”

6. Chinese journalists value personal relationships. “Chinese journalists, while still placing a heavier weighting on the inherent newsworthiness of a story, nonetheless still place a high value on getting to know the in-house and agency PR folks they deal with day-to-day.”

7. Off-the-record can easily become on-the-record. “Editors are more likely to chop material from a story that isn’t supported by a quote or data point from a trustworthy source. If you’re hoping to be helpful to a reporter while keeping your company’s name out of the story, don’t count on it.”

8. Chinese media will read quotes back before publishing. “They don’t always do this, but in general, their willingness to read back quotes before publishing for fact-checking is fairly high.”

9. Most reporters don’t speak English very well. “This means you need to make sure you deliver your message in Chinese. Having native speakers of Chinese deliver a presentation at a media briefing or answer questions during an interview is ideal.”

10. A growing number of Chinese reporters speak English extremely well. “They’ve probably earned degrees abroad, or belong to that class of remarkable people who mysteriously master English without ever having stepped foot outside of China.”

 
Click the image to read more from Leibowitz.


 

Season’s Greetings :-)

24 Dec

Happy holidays to all. And a healthy new year!

As reported by HubSpot, several ad agencies have sent out interesting holiday cards this year: “It’s that time of year again. The time where agencies use all their remaining creativity and joyful spirit to create festive holiday cards, videos, Web sites, and even fruitcake. It’s also the time where agency staffers are given free reign to get down-right weird — and this year did not disappoint.”

Here are a selection of video cards. PLEASE not not get offended. The videos are in good fun.
 

 


 

 

 

 

 

Sprout Social Media Index

3 Dec

There is a lot of discussion about how companies should/can rate the effectiveness of social media. One interesting assessment is the Sprout Social Index.

As reported by Douglass Karr for Marketing Technology Blog:

“5 out of every 6 requests made by consumers on social media to a business go unanswered. Businesses continue to make the terrible mistake of utilizing social media as a broadcast medium rather than recognizing its impact as a communication medium. Long ago, companies recognized the importance of managing inbound calls since customer satisfaction is directly attributable to retention and increased customer value.”

“The volume of social media requests have increased 77% year over year. But the response has only been a 5% increase by businesses. That’s a huge gap! Why aren’t social requests getting the same attention? My guess is that consumers don’t expect a response as they do via phone so they’re not getting as upset as they do when sitting on a call that goes unanswered. But the opportunity for businesses to truly make a social impact is huge in most industries… especially knowing that your competitors aren’t responsive!”

“The Sprout Social Index is a report compiled and released by Sprout Social. All referenced data is based on 18,057 public social profiles (9,106 Facebook; 8,951 Twitter) of continually active accounts between Q1 2013 and Q2 2014. More than 160 million messages sent during that time were analyzed for the purposes of this report.”

 Check out the Sprout infographic.

 

 

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