Tag Archives: planning

Are Marketers Story Tellers Or Scientists?

15 Apr

This is any interesting question, as there are three possible answers: both (the most widely held view), story tellers, or scientists.

With this in mind, check out the YouTube video below by IDG Knowledge Hub:

“According to this 2014 Tech Marketing Priorities study by IDG Research, a successful marketer needs to be the proper balance of storyteller and data scientist. This is a challenge media companies can assist with on several fronts through the design of custom marketing programs to fuel the ‘storytelling’ … to help with the ‘science’ of designing and managing data-driven marketing strategies. This IDG Research survey was conducted of global senior tech marketing leaders providing insights into key marketing priorities for 2015 and beyond.”

 

 

GREAT New Marketing Report from McKinsey & Company

13 Apr

The current issue of the McKinsey Quarterly focuses  on the “dawn of marketing’s next golden age, new ways to create value in the sales channel, the power of people analytics, and more.”

Click the image to access the 112-page report. Lots to learn!
 
McKinsey
 

Better Communicating with Loyal Customers

7 Apr

by Joel R. Evans and Barry Berman

 
In this post, we resume our discussion about gaining more loyalty and patronage from current customers. The focus is on communicating with ongoing customers. Our assumption for today is that your business has started to develop a customer database and that you are also now at least thinking about enacting a frequent-shopper program. 

There are several basic issues that should be considered in better preparing to communicate with current customers:

  •  What topics/themes should be covered?

During the year, there should be a combination of “image” and “product/event” oriented messages; yet, the two messages do not have to be presented together. Image messages are broad and intended to portray positive company traits to customers (such as the number of years a firm has been in business, the family-owned nature of a business, the emphasis on customer services and a friendly sales staff, the quality of products sold, etc.) These messages are long term in emphasis and geared to making customers feel good about the firm. Product/event messages are more specific (such as the introduction of a new product, a special sale, holiday shopping, etc.). The purpose is to get short-term business. Frequent-shopper programs are both image and product-/event-oriented.

  • What audience should be addressed?

By examining the firm’s customer database, people may be divided into five categories: regular, heavy shoppers; regular, light shoppers; infrequent, heavy shoppers (those who seldom shop with you, but who spend a lot when they do); infrequent, light shoppers; and former shoppers (people who once shopped with you, but who have not done so in at least sixth months or a year). Different communications approaches should be tried with each of these groups.

  • What medium should be used to communicate?

Personalized communications should predominate. Therefore, E-mail with each shopper’s name (and not with “Dear sir or  madam”) and telephone calls should be the media most used. Because E-mails are less costly and can reach a large group quickly, they are often the preferred medium for communicating with current customers. However, if a firm wants to show greater interest in its regular, heavy shoppers or to try to recapture some former customers, phone calls better indicate to people how customer-oriented a firm really is.

  • How often should communications with current customers be conducted?

E-mails should be sent at least monthly. If possible, a phone call just to keep in touch with customers (not to sell anything) should be made at least once or twice a year. As we have noted before, customers are often impressed when they receive friendly rather than just sales-oriented E-mails and calls; they like to feel appreciated. Obviously, product/theme communications should be sent at appropriate times during the year.

  • What should be the mix of communications targeted at current versus new customers?

The typical small firm, as well as some larger ones, allot very little (or nothing) from their promotional budgets for communicating with just their current customers. They either spend all of their budgets on attracting new customers or, more often, they use the same messages for both current and new customers. Our recommendation is for firms to spend a minimum of 15-20 percent of their promotional budgets on messages targeted exclusively to current customers.

 

Great Service: Be Fast, Friendly, and Helpful

6 Apr

StellaService is a relatively new firm that measures the quality of customer service provided by online retailers.

According to the company:

Dedicated to helping consumers make more informed online shopping decisions, StellaService is the first and only independent provider of customer service ratings for online retailers. Using its proprietary, rigorous evaluation system, StellaService rates thousands of retailers each year across a broad array of criteria, including usability and online tools, shipping and returns, and customer support. To maintain its independence and objectivity, StellaService pays for all products it purchases and relies on its staff of trained, full-time customer experience analysts to test the companies it evaluates. Based in New York City, the company also publishes reports and other research to help companies worldwide improve their service operations.”

Here’s a short video about customer service and StellaService.

 

StellaService: Be Fast, Friendly and Helpful from StellaService on Vimeo.

 

Mobile Internet Advertising Is Booming

2 Apr

In a very short time, mobile advertising has really taken off. And it promises to keep on booming. Thus, marketers must act accordingly. :-)

According to new research by eMarketer:

“The global mobile advertising market will hit two significant milestones in 2016, according to new figures from eMarketer, surpassing $100 billion in spending and accounting for more than 50% of all digital ad expenditure for the first time.The $101.37 billion to be spent on ads served to mobile phones and tablets worldwide next year represents a nearly 430% increase from 2013. Between 2016 and 2019, the last year in our forecast period, mobile ad spending will nearly double, hitting $195.55 billion to account for 70.1% of digital ad spend as well as over one-quarter of total media ad spending globally.”

 

Click the image to read more from eMarketer.

 

 

Resume Tips You Can Use

1 Apr

In this post, let us discuss six aspects of resume design – and provide tips accordingly:

  •   What is the purpose of a resume?

A resume should attract the attention of a prospective employer and interest the prospective employer to invite the applicant to an interview. A resume is NOT the vehicle for a person to present his/her life story. It IS the vehicle to provide the relevant and distinctive background of the applicant.

  •  Should there be an opening summary at the top of the resume?

For two reasons, the answer to this question is yes. One, this immediately lets the prospective employer  recognize the type of job for which the applicant is applying. Two, an opening summary enables the applicant to create his/her self brand and highlight what makes that individual unique.

To learn more about the value of self branding, read here.

  • How should you decide what content to include on the resume?

Although it is essential to include one’s education, work experience, and special skills on a resume, it is also vital not to overwhelm the prospective employer with too much information. The reader will most likely skim the resume and find a densely-worded resume not worth the effort. In addition, by having too much content, the reader is not guided to the most important information.

Here a few specific tips: (1) Ask yourself this question and address it through your resume — What the are the five to ten top reasons why a potential employer should hire me instead of another applicant (your competitive advantages)? (2) Highlight your accomplishments — not just your past job functions. (3) Do NOT place as much emphasis on a job you had five years ago as the one you had most recently. [I am continuously amazed by how many resumes I review for my students and alumni that have as many bullet points for an internship they had as their full-time jobs!!]

  •  How long should your resume be?

Over the years, I have reviewed thousands of resumes. I still firmly believe that one page is sufficient for an applicant at any level of experience. But some others differ and think a slightly longer resume is acceptable IF one is looking for a senior-level position. The following is a very good rule to keep in mind, as provided by Careers Plus Resumes for Careerealism:

“A resume will first receive a very brief scan, often 10-20 seconds, to determine if the candidate appears to meet the major requirements. While the entire resume may be quickly scanned, utilizing a summary of qualifications with keywords and phrases based upon one’s career goal and job target is advantageous. A resume that passes the initial scan will then receive greater scrutiny to determine if a candidate qualifies for an interview. Here, relevant depth and detail in the history is best since the candidate’s experience, skills, and strengths – as they apply to the position – will be more thoroughly assessed.”

  • Is it OK to use one version of a resume for all possible jobs?

NO! NO! NO! In this era of easy-to-adapt Word files, it is inexcusable to use the same resume for all jobs. You want the potential employer to be interested in you. So, show you are interested in them. Tailor your resume to the specific job opening and potential employer. One size does NOT fit all.

Consider these observations from Dawn Rasmussen, writing for Careerealism:

“As we go through our careers, our background evolves into probably at least three or more different thematic areas. In my lifetime, I’ve been a meeting planner, television producer, tourism manager, educator, and resume writer, to name a few. Can I pull all of these areas under one roof/one resume? Not a chance. No one could possibly digest it all – there is too much stuff ‘muddying’ the waters. The trick to hitting a moving target is to get grounded first.”

Focus On One Area

Take a deep breath and think about what area you are actually going to have the highest degree of job search success. Then focus your efforts on that area. I would suggest one, two, but no more than three major areas. Then create a separate document for EACH of those themes.

Create A ‘Relevant History’ Header

Create a section header entitled “RELEVANT HISTORY,” then list the job records most relevant to the position to which you are applying first, then summarize (if necessary) any non-relevant ones to avoid distracting the reader. That way, you can account for any holes that open up in your work experience caused by moving non-relevant history into an “Additional Background” header.
Read more at http://www.careerealism.com/resume-versions-need/#zArwl7fddZdg5oFL.99

Can I pull all of these areas under one roof/one resume?

Not a chance. No one could possibly digest it all – there is too much stuff “muddying” the waters if, say, I were to apply to be a faculty member in a post-secondary school. The trick to hitting those moving target is to get grounded first.

Focus On One Area

Take a deep breath and think about what area you are actually going to have the highest degree of job search success. Then focus your efforts on that area. I would suggest one, two, but no more than three major areas. Then create a separate document for EACH of those themes.

Create A ‘Relevant History’ Header

Create a section header entitled “RELEVANT HISTORY,” then list the job records most relevant to the position to which you are applying first, then summarize (if necessary) any non-relevant ones to avoid distracting the reader. That way, you can account for any holes that open up in your work experience caused by moving non-relevant history into an “Additional Background” header.

“Take a deep breath and think about what area you are actually going to have the highest degree of job search success. Then focus your efforts on that area. I would suggest one, two, but no more than three major areas. Then create a separate document for EACH of those themes. Create a section header entitled ‘RELEVANT HISTORY,’ then list the job records most relevant to the position to which you are applying first, then summarize (if necessary) any non-relevant ones to avoid distracting the reader. That way, you can account for any holes that open up in your work experience caused by moving non-relevant history into an ‘Additional Background’ header.”
  • Does the “look”  of the resume matter?
Yes, it does. These are some typical mistakes to avoid: (1) Do not use an overly small font. (2) Do not have small margins. (3) Do not have spelling or grammatical mistakes. (4) Do not use plain copy paper; use quality paper. (5) Do not use exotic paper colors; stick to white or off-white.

 
 

GOOD LUCK!
[As Branch Rickey, the Brooklyn Dodgers general manager who signed Jackie Robinson to be the first African-American to play Major League Baseball, once said: “Luck is the residue of hard work and design.”]

 

The State of Wearable Technology

27 Mar

To date, the current popularity of wearable technology seems to be more of a company and media public relations campaign than based on actual sales revenues. In many cases, firms have not met their sales goals for the latest in wearable technology; and consumer interest is far less than expected. This is in some part due to consumers questioning whether they really need wearable technology when they have the most-advanced smartphones which are capable of doing so much.

Although some firms have succeeded with their wearable technology, Google has virtually withdrawn Google Glass from the marketplace. So, it will be interesting to see how Apple fares when it introduces its high-tech watch next month.


 
Take a look at the following infographic on wearable technology to see how far we have come in the last five-plus decades. The infographic is by Mashable.
 

 

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