Tag Archives: planning

L’Oréal Ups Its Product Mix in China

20 Apr

L’Oréal is a leading global beauty-care company: “For more than a century, L’Oréal has devoted itself solely to one business: beauty. It is a business rich in meaning, as it enables all individuals to express their personalities, gain self-confidence, and open up to others. L’Oréal has set itself the mission of offering all women and men worldwide the best of cosmetics innovation in terms of quality, efficacy, and safety. It pursues this goal by meeting the infinite diversity of beauty needs and desires all over the world.” The firm’s annual sales are nearly $30 billion worldwide.

Among L’Oréal’s leading brands are L’Oréal Paris, Lancôme Paris, Giorgio Armani Beauty, Yves Saint Laurent Beauty, Ralph Lauren Fragrances, Maybelline, Cacherel, and Garnier. According to the firm’s 2013 annual report, these are its top cosmetics markets.

Loreal global

 

With the rapid growth of the Chinese market, L’Oréal is greatly ramping up its efforts there. For example, Laurie Burkitt reports for the Wall Street Journal that:

“As part of its shifting China strategy, L’Oréal recently closed on its €636 million deal ($882.9 million) to acquire Magic Holdings International Ltd., the Chinese owner of the MG brand of beauty products. MG sells 167 different kinds of paper-peel and mud masks across China, ranging from chamomile allergy-relieving to red wine complex whitening. L’Oréal will first look to expand MG masks in the brand’s home market, where the French company is refocusing after pulling its mass-market Garnier beauty-products brand amid intense competition.”

“‘If you are a beauty company, you need to have a Chinese skin care brand,’ said Alexis Perakis-Valat, executive vice-president of L’Oréal’s Asia Pacific region, in an interview. ‘Skincare is to China what makeup is to the U.S.’”

Click the image to read more.


 

What Motivates Car Buyers Around the World?

18 Apr

There are many different reasons why consumers buy specific car types and models — even in the United States. But, how different are purchase motivations around the world?

To answer this question, Nielsen recently conducted a large-scale online survey in 60 countries:

“’Linking global automotive demand with consumer sentiments and media habits is vital to developing marketing strategies that connect the right consumers with the right automotive brands,’ said Pat Gardiner, president of Nielsen Automotive. ‘The Asia-Pacific and Latin American regions, as expected, represent large areas of growth opportunity for the industry, but capturing this opportunity hinges on marketers successfully identifying, understanding’ and effectively connecting with the needs and desires of these buyers.’”

“One key to unlocking the demand drivers is discerning what role a car plays in the consumer’s life. Is it for utility — simply a mode of transportation to get you from one place to another? Is it to express status — a symbol of the success you’ve achieved in life? Or is it more purely emotional — you just love to drive? While each of these sentiments may play a role in the car-buying decision process, connecting with the emotions that pull at the heartstrings draws consumers more powerfully along the path to purchase.”

Click the image to read more.

 


 

The Impact of Corporate Culture on Branding

16 Apr

A clear , desirable, and distinctive product/brand positioning message is essential for companies to be successful in today’s competitive marketplace.

What is sometimes under-appreciated is how crucial the corporate culture is in establishing and maintaining the correct product/brand position in consumers’ minds.

Take a look at this infographic for an innovate perspective on this from masters-in-marketing.org. Click the infographic for a lot more background information.
 
Corporate Culture
Source: Masters-in-Marketing.org
 

An Infographic Primer on Self-Branding

11 Apr

As we have noted through several posts (click here, for example), self-branding is an essential tool in one’s career toolbox.

Here is a detailed infographic on self-branding by Seth Price of Placester and Barry Feldman of Feldman Creative (hosted at marketingprofs.com) that offers more for you to think about.

 


 

“Incomplete” Products Can Spur Customer Consumption

28 Mar

According to Barbara Kahn, a Wharton professor, we are likely to consume more if we believe we are buying an “incomplete” product. Is this you? Read on.

In the Knowledge@Wharton video below, “Kahn talks about how a complete product encourages more consumption: A person is likely to eat two pieces of cheese with holes in them but only one if it is solid, for example. It’s a matter of perception, Kahn explains. She also discusses her research on the attention that consumers pay to large assortments of goods and how it influences their choices when information is presented visually or verbally. In addition, she describes a study on how consumers behave when goods are stacked vertically versus horizontally.”

 

Lessons from SXSW Interactive

20 Mar

As noted at its Web site: “The South by Southwest® (SXSW®) Conferences & Festivals offer the unique convergence of original music, independent films, and emerging technologies. Fostering creative and professional growth alike, SXSW is the premier destination for discovery.”

At the recent SXSW Interactive event,  JWT Intelligence did some background research and came up with 10 key overriding themes for us to consider:

  1. The Snowden effect
  2. Data permanence
  3. Demystifying cryptocurrency
  4. The future of the Internet
  5. Wearables
  6. Man versus machine
  7. Disruption
  8. The humanitarian potential of technology
  9. Visualization
  10. Mindfulness and technology

Here is a slideshow that looks in-depth at these overriding themes from JWT Intelligence:
 

 

It’s Critical for EVERY Company to Keep on Innovating

16 Mar

What are the two major goals of many companies? To grow sales and to grow profit. And while most companies say that being innovative is also a key goal, do they really mean it? The typical company tends to spend two percent or less of revenues on research and development. And the great majority of “new” products are usually simple line extensions or new models. At a large number of companies, innovation may not be dead — but it is certainly in a deep slumber.

With this in mind, let’s take a look at a terrific article called “Why Companies Stop Innovating” by Steve Blank for Inc. According to Blank:

“There’s been lots written about how companies need to be more innovative, but very little on what stops them from doing so. Companies looking to be innovative face a conundrum: Every policy and procedure that makes them efficient execution machines stifles innovation.”

“Facing continuous disruption from globalization, China, the Internet, the diminished power of brands, and the changing workforce, existing enterprises are establishing corporate innovation groups. These groups are adapting or adopting the practices of startups and accelerators — disruption and innovation rather than direct competition, customer development versus more product features, agility and speed versus lowest cost.”

“But paradoxically, in spite of their seemingly endless resources, innovation inside of an existing company is much harder than inside a startup. For most companies it feels like innovation can only happen by exception and heroic efforts, not by design. The question is: Why?”

Click below to see Blank’s detailed answers to this question.

 

 

Building an Online Brand Reputation

9 Mar

Because it is so important, we have made a number of posts on self branding, such as this one. Today’s post shows how to build a better online self brand image.

As reported by Deborah Shane for Careerealism.com:

“The questions I get asked most frequently when working with people on their brand marketing and social marketing strategy are, ‘How do I build a following and build my reputation?’ and, ‘How do I get people to comment and re-tweet?’ The social media mentors I respect come from different arenas and all kind of say the same thing: Be authentic and real, create useful content, be consistent, engage in the conversation, and give more than you ask.Want to build your brand reputation? Here are some of my insights and some of the things I have learned that have helped me make amazing connections, grow my reach and business, and have a whole lot of fun sharing ideas and learning from others.”

Take a look at this Careerealism.com slideshow based on Shane’s suggestions.
 


 

Welcome Back, One World Trade Center

7 Mar

It has been about twelve-and-a-half years since one of the worst days in American history — a tragedy that many of us will remember forever. Now, One World Trade Center is ready to reclaim its unofficial title as “The Top of America.” And in the turbulent times we face, it is gratifying to see an important symbol back in the sky, although we will still miss the “Twin Towers.”

In recognition of the rebirth of 1 WTC, Time magazine has produced a great multimedia tribute. Click here to access it. As Richard Licayo writes:

“For years after the 9/11 attacks, nearly all the activity at Ground Zero was downward—digging through the piles of debris, excavating a vast pit to restore the ruined transit lines, preparing the foundations for the new buildings that would emerge there. Even the memorial that opened in 2011 was an exercise in the poetics of descent — two vast cubic voids, each with water cascading down all four sides, carrying grief to some underground resting place.”

“The memorial has turned out to be a lovely thing, but what the site still needed was something that climbed, something that spoke to the idea that emotional burdens might not only be lowered into the ground but also released into the air. Now we have it: One World Trade Center, the glass-and-steel exclamation point, all 1,776 feet of it, is nearing completion close to where the Twin Towers once stood. No doubt the new building’s official dedication will open the way to a necessary debate over its merits as architecture and urbanism, its turbulent design history, and the compromises made over the long years it took to get the thing built. But in one important respect, One World Trade Center has already succeeded. It has reclaimed the sky. And this is the view from there.”

Click the image to see an aerial video of 1 WTC.
 

 

Lego Mania Goes Viral

6 Mar

The Lego Movie has turned out to be quite a global phenomenon. Click the image to visit the movie’s Web site.

According to Box Office Mojo, through March 4, 2014, the movie had grossed $333,000 worldwide — $212 million in the United States and $121 million in foreign markets. And, unlike some other blockbuster movies that cost much more to make, The Lego Movie cost $60 million to produce, making it highly profitable.

But The Lego Movie mania goes far beyond the popularity of the film itself. There have been a lot of promotional tie ins (see this article, for example). And Toys “R” Us even set up special displays for Lego movie figures.

Separate and apart from the recent movie, there is also a Lego “YouTube Spotlight” with a number of “fan-made” videos based on Lego characters. Many of the videos preceded the introduction of the movie — nonetheless, they extend Lego brand recognition and continue to be highly viewed. The most popular Lego movie in the spotlight is Battle of the Brick: Built for Combat, which has been viewed nearly 17 million times.

All in all, it’s a great time for Lego.

[Note: The video below, Battle of the Brick: Built for Combat, is 27 minutes long.]
 

 

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