Tag Archives: opportunity

The State of Wearable Technology

27 Mar

To date, the current popularity of wearable technology seems to be more of a company and media public relations campaign than based on actual sales revenues. In many cases, firms have not met their sales goals for the latest in wearable technology; and consumer interest is far less than expected. This is in some part due to consumers questioning whether they really need wearable technology when they have the most-advanced smartphones which are capable of doing so much.

Although some firms have succeeded with their wearable technology, Google has virtually withdrawn Google Glass from the marketplace. So, it will be interesting to see how Apple fares when it introduces its high-tech watch next month.


 
Take a look at the following infographic on wearable technology to see how far we have come in the last five-plus decades. The infographic is by Mashable.
 

 

Bouncing Back from Job Rejection

23 Mar

From a professional perspective, one of the toughest events with which we have to cope is job rejection. When (if) this happens to us, we need to get past our feelings of rejection, anger, and inadequacy — and take a proactive approach to “get back in the game.”

Mary Sherwood Sevinsky, a career consultant, writing for Careerealism offers eight tips to follow when dealing with job rejection:

1. Set Realistic Goals

“Long-term goals give you something to look forward to. Short-term goals ensure you are moving in the right direction and moving to your long term goals. Daily goals will get you out of bed in the morning.”

2. Do Your Best

“Take the time to try to match your resume or application details to what the employer is looking for. That way, you will be one of the few selected for an interview (and hired!). The extra effort and time has value, and they can help you will feel like you are really doing something meaningful.”

3. Change the Things You Do Each Day

“Search for jobs one day, follow up another, identify companies to cold call once a week, network one day, visit companies in person periodically. Don’t forget to eat, sleep, get dressed, exercise, and go outside every day. Make your own schedule and stick to it!”

4. Make Sure You Have the Necessary Skills

“Read blogs, articles, and/or books about career planning and job searching. Explore your field or potential occupations to determine if you need more skills to be competitive. Read articles related to your desired job or about job searching and interviewing every day.”

5. Have a Support Group

“You can’t do it alone. Ask for help outside of the family if need be. Reach out friends, ex-coworkers, and church or community members. You need someone to listen to your ideas and give you feedback.”

6. Network

“You probably know how to network, but maybe you are too dispirited or you don’t see the value in it. Nonetheless, it is a necessity and can result in your next job if you make the time and effort to contact and maintain connection with others. Join a civic group or one at your local career placement office, or volunteer. It is most important to start and continue to get out there and meet people – maintain your connections!”

7. Get Creative

“If you feel that you MUST have a specific position or salary before considering a job, you may be missing out on some great prospects! Purchase a real newspaper (or look at every job board posting within a 20 mile area or less) and look at every job. If you do this intermittently, you will have a better indication of what jobs are offered and you may discover a new direction that is perfect for you!”

8. Be Realistic

“You may want to think about moving to where there are jobs. Think about places in that you would like to live or parts of the country where people you know currently live. Search for jobs in those areas periodically to see if it makes sense to start a job search in another area in addition to your current one.”

Click the image to read more.
 

Photo from Shutterstock


 

2014 Global Patent Filings

21 Mar

According to the WIPO Web site:

“Intellectual property (IP) refers to creations of the mind, such as inventions; literary and artistic works; designs; and symbols, names, and images used in commerce. IP is protected in law by, for example, patents, copyright, and trademarks, which enable people to earn recognition or financial benefit from what they invent or create. By striking the right balance between the interests of innovators and the wider public interest, the IP system aims to foster an environment in which creativity and innovation can flourish.”

“The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) is the global forum for intellectual property policy, services, information and cooperation. A specialized agency of the United Nations, WIPO assists its 188 member states in developing a balanced international IP legal framework to meet society’s evolving needs. It provides business services for obtaining IP rights in multiple countries and resolving disputes. It delivers capacity-building programs to help developing countries benefit from using IP. And it provides free access to unique knowledge banks of IP information.”

Here is an infographic about global patent filings in 2014.
 
infographics_pct_2014
 

An Infographic Dictionary for Business Founders

20 Mar

Often times, the lingo involved with startups is in a class by itself. So, what terminology is essential for business founders to know?

As Pedro Sanchez de Lozada writes for Udemy, an online educational firm:

“Silicon Valley not only has its share of startups and founders. It has its own lucrative lingo. Outsiders need time to adjust to such new-found words. Though we see this same lingo popping up in places like New York, Boston, Portland and LA, the Valley is home to some of the most outrageously butchered start-up buzzwords.”

“If you are just visiting, here for a long-term stay, or moving all together, I suggest you become familiar with how the left coasters chat. You may need to know this at your next pitch. Oh, and more importantly, don’t take these definitions too seriously.”

Check out Udemy’s “Founder’s Dictionary.”
 

 

How to Generate Better Product Ideas

18 Mar

New, actionable ideas are the long-term lifeblood of both large and small firms. It is rare that a business can survive over time with just the products being marketing today.

Many companies recognize that idea generation and assessment are aided by following a series of steps. Others are totally haphazard in their approach and hope to eventually have a “eureka” moment.

As Laura Montini, reports for Inc.:

When it comes to great ideas, intuition is ‘more powerful than intellect.’ That’s according to the late Steve Jobs. Many experts would agree that truly transformative ideas rarely come from one individual with a high IQ. Instead, these researchers, executives, and entrepreneurs believe that innovation is largely the result of freewheeling collaboration — with just a few guidelines.”

“Below Bluescape, creator of collaboration software and hardware, organized a few of these experts’ insights into four main steps. Take a look a the infographic below for tips on creating an effective idea strategy.”

 

 

An Infographic Look at the Evolution of Web Design

16 Mar

Web design and the quality/features of Web sites have certainly come a long way over the last 25 years.

AmeriCommerce has put together an excellent infographic on the evolution of Web design:

“During the 25 years since the Internet entered our lives, change has been the only constant. And nowhere has that trend of ongoing change been more evident than in the world of Web design. We all know how important great design is today, but what did Web design look like in 1990? How has it changed over the years? And what can we expect to happen in coming years? We take a look at the history of Web design in our latest infographic.”

 
The History of Web Design
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Taylor Swift: Marketing Guru

13 Mar

Taylor Swift is not only one of the leading stars in the world. She is also a marketing innovator — as exemplified by her recent decision to abandon Spotify.

Here’s one perspective on Swift as a marketing pioneer from Knowledge@Wharton:

If you’re ready to ‘party like its 1989,’ you’ll have to talk to Taylor Swift first. The pop star recently applied to trademark that phrase and others related to her songs — a move that marks a shift in the industry, as artists, songwriters, and music publishers increasingly become independent brands. But the case also raises questions about where artists and industry players might cross the line and damage their reputations.”

“Swift’s trademark quest could work out fine, or it could backfire, according to R. Polk Wagner, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, whose specialties include copyright and trademark law. ‘She could trademark every line from her lyrics, but there are real limits,’ he said. ‘Every time she does that, she is risking money and risks [her] reputation. Twitter  She has to walk a careful line between being an aggressive brander, promoter and builder of the Taylor Swift brand and crossing that line into aggressively suing her fans and customers.’”

Click the image to read more.
 

 

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