Tag Archives: opportunity

How Do College Students “Connect” with Brands?

27 Jan

Marketers today recognize the enormous buying power of college students and very much want to gain their attention and patronage. But are marketers able to “connect” with college students through media channels which they most favor?

As eMarketer puts it:

“Amid their interest in millennials, marketers look to the 19 million-plus U.S. college students as an audience worth courting. After all, it is a mostly millennial subset that already deploys considerable spending power and (with degree in hand) will be poised to outearn and outspend noncollege millennials for decades to come, according to a new eMarketer report, ‘U.S. College Students 101: Updating Fundamental Facts About This Diverse, Digital Cohort.’”

“Regardless of medium, advertising is just one of many influences on students’ purchase decisions, and not the most important. When an August 2014 Fluent study asked students to say what shapes their back-to-school purchase decisions, the top of the list was populated by peer opinion and money-saving offers.”

Click the chart to read more.
 

 

JWT Intelligence’s 100 Key Predictions for 2015

23 Jan

Each year, JWT Intelligence offers 100 interesting trends to be aware of for the coming year. Here are its 2015 predictions.
 

 

Entrepreneurs Feeling GREAT About 2015

17 Jan

After enduring the Great Recession, many — but, by no means all — entrepreneurs have done better the last couple of years. So, how are they feeling as we enter further into 2015?

As Leigh Buchanan reports for Inc., the leading publication devoted to entrepreneurs, as well small and fast-growing firms:

“Entrepreneurs, optimistic by nature, are particularly — indeed, almost giddily — enthusiastic. Our second annual State of Small Business survey finds their collective confidence up sharply from last year. While they do have concerns — about health care costs, political gridlock, and regulation — most seem to share the sentiments of J. Schwan, CEO of Solstice Mobile in Chicago, who says, ‘It would take something pretty significant to inhibit the growth we’ve been experiencing.'”

“The percentage of respondents who describe themselves as ‘very confident’ about the economy’s prospects over the next 12 months has almost tripled, from just under 10 percent last year to 26 percent this year. The number who say they have little confidence that the economy will be strong has dropped by more than half.”

“Survey respondents, drawn from the Inc. 5000 universe of America’s fastest-growing companies, were even more upbeat about the prospects for their own companies, with 57 percent rating them as ‘excellent,’ versus 38 percent [last year]. The percentage who see their company’s 12-month outlook as average or poor fell from 16 percent to just 8 percent.”

Click the image to read more.
 
Inc

 

Marketing Number One in Yet Another Career Survey

4 Jan

For those with a college degree, Marketing places TWO career options in CareerBuilder’s “Top Jobs for 2015″ survey — Marketing Executive at number one and Sales Manager at number ten.

According to the study’s press release:

“Looking for a new job in the New Year? CareerBuilder partnered with Economic Modeling Specialists Intl. (EMSI) to compile a list of hot jobs for 2015 based on supply and demand. The list features occupations for which the number of jobs companies post each month significantly outpaces the number of people they’re actually able to hire – showing where companies are hungry for talent and how much the positions pay.”

“‘Job creation is gaining ground and job seekers are gaining leverage,’ said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder and co-author of The Talent Equation. ‘For nearly 70 occupations in the U.S., the rate at which workers are being hired isn’t keeping up with the frequency and volume of open positions being advertised. By drawing attention to talent deficits, our list underscores opportunities in everything from technology and health care to sales and transportation for job seekers looking to make a change.’”

“The analysis uses EMSI’s extensive labor market database, which pulls from over 90 national and state employment resources. CareerBuilder and EMSI looked at the average number of people hired per month in more than 700 occupations from January 2013 to August 2014 and compared that to the number of job postings for each occupation aggregated from online job sites for the same period.”

Click the image to read more.
 

 

Be Better Prepared for Chinese Media

30 Dec

Are you doing business in China? Do you understand the special dimensions of utilizing Chinese media?

Glenn Leibowitz of McKinsey & Company offers us 10 tips for dealing with Chinese media:

1. Global news penetrates Chinese media very quickly. “Chinese media follow international media very closely. They’ll pick up stories and translate them on the same day they appear in a major international news outlet.”

2. Media are censored. “Even more commercially-oriented media outlets still need to run their stories through the vast government censorship apparatus.”

3. Media like stories aligned with the government’s economic agenda. “Stories seen as supporting the government’s economic narrative  have a higher chance of landing on the pages of a publication or Web site.”

4. There are three “flavors” of written Chinese. “In Mainland China, media use the ‘simplified’ Chinese character set, which contains many characters that differ in how they’re written in Hong Kong and Taiwan, which use the ‘traditional’, or ‘complex’, character set. And Hong Kong does not use exactly the same set of characters that Taiwan uses, resulting in three different ‘flavors’ of written Chinese across the region.”

5. Editorial standards are rising fast. “While some reporters still publish a cut-and-paste version of your press release, Chinese media  —  both frontline journalists and their editors back at the bureau  —  are getting more demanding when it comes to determining what meets their bar for news.”

6. Chinese journalists value personal relationships. “Chinese journalists, while still placing a heavier weighting on the inherent newsworthiness of a story, nonetheless still place a high value on getting to know the in-house and agency PR folks they deal with day-to-day.”

7. Off-the-record can easily become on-the-record. “Editors are more likely to chop material from a story that isn’t supported by a quote or data point from a trustworthy source. If you’re hoping to be helpful to a reporter while keeping your company’s name out of the story, don’t count on it.”

8. Chinese media will read quotes back before publishing. “They don’t always do this, but in general, their willingness to read back quotes before publishing for fact-checking is fairly high.”

9. Most reporters don’t speak English very well. “This means you need to make sure you deliver your message in Chinese. Having native speakers of Chinese deliver a presentation at a media briefing or answer questions during an interview is ideal.”

10. A growing number of Chinese reporters speak English extremely well. “They’ve probably earned degrees abroad, or belong to that class of remarkable people who mysteriously master English without ever having stepped foot outside of China.”

 
Click the image to read more from Leibowitz.


 

LinkedIn Exec: Marketers Make Great CEOs

10 Dec

Russell Glass is Head of Products for LinkedIn Marketing Solutions. He was formerly the founder, president, and CEO of Bizo, a B2B audience marketing and data platform. Glass is also the co-author of a new book titled The Big-Data Driven Business: How to Use Big Data to Win Customers, Beat Competitors, and Boost Profits.

In a recent article for Adweek tied to his new book, Glass says that:

“The rising importance of data to companies (organizations in general and marketing departments in particular) is changing the perception of marketing’s value. In fact, marketing is now so important that CMOs [chief marketing officers] will make the best next-generation CEOs — thanks to their understanding of data and the customer. Only the marketing department has a clear window on the behavior of the prospect during 90 percent of the buyer’s decision making — the time spent doing research via visits to Web sites, reading online reviews, connecting with peers on social media, and conducting online searches.”

“The CMO’s team has the clearest window into customer and prospect behavior. To sales, the CMO delivers the leads most likely to buy to sales. To finance, the CMO shows his or her team’s revenue contribution. And with IT, the CMO helps built out the marketing technology stack that mediates critical interactions with customers and prospects. The winning companies of the future will be data-driven and customer-focused. No one is in a better position to lead this kind of company than the CMO — the executive who is eminently qualified to be your next CEO.”

Click the image to read more of the Adweek article. Click here to access Glass’s book on Amazon.
 

 

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