Tag Archives: good manners

How Should You Respond to Negative Social Media Comments?

30 Jun

One of the main social media challenges for all companies is how to respond to negative comments. It is imperative that negative comments be tracked and understood.

In general, there are three options for dealing with negative social media comments: (1) ignore the comments; (2) point out why the comments are wrong; and (3) constructively reply to the comments. Although many firms choose option (1) or (2), it is more appropriate to choose option (3).

As High Powered SEO puts it:

“You have spent hours preparing an amazing post or share something worth a meaningful discussion. Then, you notice that a couple of people are saying the complete opposite from what you have shared. This is normally fine except they express their opinions in a way that may rub you the wrong way. How do you handle this type of situation? Do you lash out in order to get your point across, not respond at all, delete the comment, or just flat-out ignore it?”

“There are plenty of ways you can handle this type of situation, but if you don’t handle it the right way you could be doing much more harm than good. It is best to handle this situation tactfully.”

Check out the infographic of tips from High Powered SEO.
 
RESPOND TO NEGATIVE COMMENTS ON SOCIAL MEDIA AND BLOG POSTS  INFOGRAPHIC
 

Global Personality Maps

20 Jun

JWT Intelligence has just introduced a new Web site called Personality Atlas.  For marketers, this is an interesting and entertaining visual look at the world:

“The Personality Atlas report is based on findings from a 27-market study of 6,075 adults aged 18-plus that used SONAR, JWT’s proprietary online research tool. The study covered Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Czech Republic, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Pakistan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Thailand, United Kingdom, and United States. Our respondents provided their perceptions of each country surveyed, including their own — we looked at overall perceptions, as well as perceptions related to people, culture, government and brands/products.”

Click the map for three views of personality: (1) How the world views other countries. (2) How countries view themselves. (3) See where you fit. Hover over the country to read the description. Enjoy!
 

 

An Interesting New Concept: “Sympathetic Pricing”

11 Jun

As we have written several times before, the marketing dictionary seems to be exploding. The new term for today is sympathetic pricing.

According to Trendwatching.com, sympathetic pricing is driven by this phenomenon:

“Get ready for a wave of imaginative discounts that relieve lifestyle pain points, offer a helping hand in difficult times, or support a shared value.”

However, Trendwatching.com adds that:

“When brands claim to care about people and their everyday challenges, or about the shared problems we all face – sustainability, social responsibility, and more – most consumers think they’re just saying that. Sure, that’s a simple characterization of a complex issue, and it doesn’t apply to all consumers and every brand.”

“But countless surveys, reports, and statistics all point in the same direction: when it comes to truly caring about consumers, owning a higher purpose and generally being a more HUMAN BRAND, most people think that most brands still don’t get it.”

Click the image to read a LOT more about sympathetic pricingfrom the seller’s and the buyer’s perspectives.
 


 

Why Do Many Ads Annoy Us?

26 May

Advertising is an important communication tool for most firms. Yet, a seemingly endless challenge is how to advertise in a way that attracts consumers while not annoying them.

As Consumer Reports recently noted:

“Everybody has an ad come-on they love to hate. The top five, according to a recent nationally representative survey by the Consumer Reports National Research Center, are robocalls; false claims that you’ve won a prize or sweepstakes; bills that look real but aren’t; pop-up online ads; and hyperbolic ads for medical remedies. Least annoying of all the gripes we asked about: ads on billboards.”

“Women tend to get more annoyed than men, our survey of 1,000 Americans found, especially with fast-talking disclaimers; ads that target people based on past purchases, demographics, or behavior, and asterisks tied to tiny disclaimers in print or online ads.”

Take a look at the infographic below. How do YOU feel about these advertising tactics?
 

 

Dos and Dont’s for Your New Job!!

18 May

Congratulations to all of you who are about to embark on a new job. Now, it is important to do everything you can to excel at that job. Have you thought about this enough? Getting the job is just the start. This post contains both some dos and don’ts. The don’ts are presented first.

According to Yun Siang Long, writing for Careerealism, here are five DON’Ts for how to  behave at your new job:

  1. Having a ‘better than thou’ attitude — “No matter how skilled and how knowledgeable you are in your field, be humble. You are there to contribute, not make people feel bad about themselves.”
  2. Comparing the previous company to the present — “Frame your suggestions in a friendly manner. Comparing it to your previous company and saying how great it was will just hasten your career suicide.”
  3. Expecting respect and trust — “Respect needs to be earned and trust can only be gained through time and work quality. You have to work at it. This is a new company and you are only as good as your last project.”
  4. Being rude — “It’s bad enough that being rude anywhere will make you unwelcomed. It is worst if you are rude at your new workplace.”
  5. Disregarding the existing company culture and dynamics at the new job — “Every company has their culture and internal dynamics. Learn these cultures whether you like them or not, understand the internal dynamics that is at play. Do not be judgmental.”

 

Now, for five key DOs for how to behave at a new job from RedStarResume, as presented by Careerealism:

 

Who’s YOUR Hero?

6 Dec

With yesterday’s passing of Nelson Mandela, it is a good time to read the article “Why We All Need Heroes” by : “Steve Jobs, Mahatma Gandhi, Susan B. Anthony, or Nelson Mandela. Pick one, or another great leader from history. It’ll give you the courage to dream big — unabashedly– despite the odds.”

Steve Jobs, Susan B. Anthony, Nelson Mandela, and Mahatma Ghandi

This article is one in a terrific series by Wadhwa, a Columbia professor, that also looks at:

 

More on Being Smart Online

12 Nov

On several occasions, this blog  has discussed the topic of being smart online (click here, for example).

Now, we have another great example of why YOU MUST be smart when you use social media. Although the story below deals with college applicants, it really addresses this broader issue: Do we post too much material online that may hurt us at some point? For many, the answer is yes. So, BE SMARTER ONLINE!

As reported by Natasha Singer for the New York Times:

“At Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Me., admissions officers are still talking about the high school senior who attended a campus information session last year for prospective students. Throughout the presentation, she apparently posted disparaging comments on Twitter about her fellow attendees, repeatedly using a common expletive. Perhaps she hadn’t realized that colleges keep track of their social media mentions.”

“As certain high school seniors work meticulously this month to finish their early applications to colleges, some may not realize that comments they casually make online could negatively affect their prospects. In fact, new research suggests that online scrutiny is growing. Of 381 college admissions officers who answered a Kaplan telephone questionnaire, 31 percent said they had visited an applicant’s Facebook or other personal social media page to learn more about them.”

Click the image to read more.

Image by John-Patrick Thomas

 

An Interesting Study on Trust

6 Nov

Trust is a big factor in our relationships — whether they are person-to-person relationships or customer-to-firm relationships. And apologies may help engender trust.

Recently, a marketing-oriented research study looked at apologetic behavior and trust. As reported by Suzanne Lucas for CBS Money Watch:

“A new study by Alison Brooks (Harvard), Hengchen Dai (University of Pennsylvania), and Maurice E. Schweitzer (University of Pennsylvania), showed that people were much more likely to lend a stranger their cell phone when the stranger first apologized for the rain – something that was clearly outside of his control. The difference was significant: Only 9 percent of strangers handed over their phones without the apology, but 47 percent did when the person apologized. The study also looked at apologizing for a computer override, and another cell phone situation, this time with a delayed flight. In all cases, apologizing for something that was clearly not the person’s fault resulted in more willingness to cooperate and higher trust ratings.”

Click the image to read more at BPS Research Digest.

 

 

Don’t Be a “Wardrober”

28 Sep

Retailers know that customer shoplifting and employee theft cost them billions of dollars a year in lost revenues just in the United States and well over $125 billion worldwide. But, the phenomenon of excessive customer returns seems to be growing, and that also affects the bottom line. And this problem has not received enough attention — until now.

Are you a “wardrober”? (Read on to see what this is.)

Consider these observations by Cotten Timberlake, Renee Dudley, and Chris Burritt, writing for Businessweek:

“Many merchants have long lived by the mantra that the customer is always right, adopting liberal return policies in hopes of winning the loyalty of free-spending shoppers. But with a recent increase in the wearing and subsequent return of expensive clothes — a practice merchants call wardrobing — many retailers are taking a stronger stand against the industry’s $8.8 billion-a-year return fraud problem. Bloomingdale’s, in February, started placing 3-inch black plastic tags in highly visible places, such as the front bottom hemline, on dresses costing more than $150 as they are being purchased. The clothes can be tried on at home without disturbing the special tag. But once a customer snaps it off to wear in public, the garment can’t be returned. Some electronics retailers have also turned to hefty restocking fees to discourage short-term use of expensive electronics to watch events such as the Super Bowl.  And high-end outdoor goods retailer REI recently announced it’s ending its lifetime return policy after customers took advantage of its lenient rules.”

Click the image to read more.

 

Photo by Emily Keegin for Bloomberg Businessweek
 

Nielsen Video on the Value of Corporate Social Responsibility

22 Sep

Last month, we blogged about the interest of consumers around the world in socially conscious companies.

Today, to further the discussion, we are offering the video below from Nielsen: “All companies want to do good, but is there a value in being socially responsible at the corporate level? The research says, yes, and consumers receptiveness is growing.”

Click the image to access the video.

 

 

VIDEO: The Value of Corporate Social Responsibility.

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