Tag Archives: Facebook

eMarketer: Most and Least Likely Trends for 2016

22 Dec

eMarketer recently posted two different predictions about 2016: the trends most likely to occur and the trends least likely to occur. They are a pretty interesting combination!

Most Likely to Occur in 2016

  1. The Voice Of the Consumer Will Be Heard
  2. Marketers Will Join the Conversation (in Messaging Apps)
  3. Mobile Payments Will Take Off
  4. Mobile Commerce Will Move Down the Funnel
  5. Millennials and Centennials Will Be OK With Releasing Even More Data
  6. Facebook Will Become Nearly Entirely Mobile

Click the image to read a lot more and to access additional charts.

 

Least Likely to Occur in 2016

  1. Ad Blocking Getting Solved
  2. Viewability Get Solved
  3. Facebook Killing YouTube
  4. Young People Abandoning Facebook in Droves
  5. Digital Spend to Surpass TV

Click the image to read a lot more and to access additional charts

 

Do We Really Want “Buy” Buttons at Social Media Sites?

15 Dec

Social media sites are rapidly ramping up their use of “buy” buttons for visitors. With buy buttons, social media users can instantly be linked to a shopping site for an item. But, do people really want buy buttons?

According to eMarketer, the answer for many people may be no:

“Social networks have been experimenting with — and even fully implementing — buy buttons into their platforms for a while. And though social media users are turning to platforms like Instagram and Pinterest to research brands and products, they are not that interested in actually using the buy buttons there.”

GlobalWebIndex polled social media users worldwide ages 16 to 64 in November 2015. When it came to their interest in using buy buttons via select social media networks, few were interested: Only 17% of respondents who used Tumblr said they were interest in using Tumblr’s buy buttons, and those were the most popular. Even fewer said they were interested in Instagram’s (14%), Pinterest’s (13%), or Twitter’s (12%) buy buttons. Interest was lowest for Facebook’s buy buttons; just 9% of Facebook users said it appealed to them.”

Click the chart to read more.

 

Facebook Cracking Down on Access to Data

28 Sep

There have been a lot of calls by government agencies, consumer groups, and individual users for Facebook to better control the information it provides to third parties. Now, it is taking another step.

As reported by  Deepa Seetharaman and Elizabeth Dwoskin for the  Wall Street Journal:

“Facebook’s restrictions on its user data, which were announced last year and put into effect in May, are rippling through academia, business, and presidential politics. Dozens of startups that had been using Facebook data have shut down, been acquired, or overhauled their businesses. Political consultants are racing to find new ways to tap voters’ social connections ahead of the 2016 presidential election.”

“’Facebook giveth and Facebook taketh away,’ said Nick Soman, who collected the locations of Facebook users’ friends to enhance his anonymous-chat app, Reveal. He later sold the app to music service Rhapsody International Inc. Mr. Soman said he admires Facebook, but learned a lesson about relying on third parties for a key component of his app.”

 
Click the chart to read more.


 

Regulatory Issues In Europe for U.S. Tech Companies

24 Jun

For quite a while, the European Commission has been rather tough in regulating large  American companies doing business in Europe and penalizing them when their practices are deemed unacceptable — sometimes, billions of dollars in fines as well as changes in business activities.

As Kelly Couturier  recently noted for the New York Times: ” The biggest American tech companies face intensifying scrutiny by European regulators — pressure that could potentially curb their sizable profits in the region and affect how they operate around the world.”

Here are some examples from Couturier:

  • Amazon — Antitrust: “The European Commission opened an investigation in June 2015 into whether the company used its dominant position in the region’s E-books market to make it harder for rivals to offer lower prices.” Taxation: “The European Union released a preliminary finding in January 2015 that a tax deal between Amazon and Luxembourg appears to amount to unfair state aid that may have enabled the company to underpay its taxes.”
  • Apple Antitrust: “European competition officials confirmed in April 2015 that they had sent questionnaires to music labels and rival music streaming companies to gather evidence and decide whether to open an antitrust investigation into Apple’s new music service.” Taxation: “Officials opened an investigation in June 2014 into whether Ireland gave preferential tax treatment to Apple.
  • Facebook Data privacy: “French, Italian, and Spanish privacy officials announced in early April 2015 they had opened investigations into the social network’s privacy policies; similar inquiries have already been started by Dutch, Belgian, and German officials. The regulators are asking whether Facebook gained sufficient approval from users when the company gained access to their online data.”
  • Google Antitrust: “In April, the European Union’s antitrust chief, Margrethe Vestager, formally charged the company of abusing its dominance in Web searches, accusing it of diverting traffic from its rivals to favor its own products and services, particularly Web sites for shopping.” Right to Be Forgotten: “Europe’s highest court ruled in May 2014 that citizens have a so-called right to be forgotten, and that search engines, including Google, must honor some requests from users to delete links to personal information.”
  • Microsoft Antitrust: “In a long-running antitrust case involving Microsoft’s software and interoperability, the company paid almost €2 billion in European fines over a decade, including a penalty in 2013 for failing to adhere to an earlier settlement.”Right to Be Forgotten: Microsoft, which operates the Bing search service, signaled in July 2014 that it planned to follow the lead of Google, by creating an online form that lets individuals request removal of links to material they say violates their online privacy.”

 

 

Click the image to read Couturier’s full article.
 

Shown here: An Apple store in Berlin. Credit Adam Berry/Getty Images for Apple

 

Marketers Need to Know: Is This End of the Facebook Free-For-All for Brands?

13 Feb

Facebook now derives several billions a year from its advertising fees to companies. But the rules keep changing. Are you prepared for what’s next?

According to Dayna Rothman, writing for Marketo:

“Ah Facebook, you never know what’s coming next! Facebook continues to change their newsfeed algorithm, making it increasingly difficult for brands to reach their fans through organic posts, forcing marketers to rethink their approach to social media. With many of the new Facebook updates and focus on user privacy and preference, organic reach continues to fall short. If you are a large brand only 2-8% of fans actually see your posts and only .073% of brands’ fans actually interact with these posts! Facebook says that these changes are in the interest of keeping users happy, but at the same time, Facebook’s ad revenue continues to climb — are paid ads a marketer’s only hope?”

“Take a look at our infographic as we explore the relationship between Facebook and brands. Is it the end of the Facebook free-for-all? And if so, what can we as marketers do about it?”

 
The End of the Facebook Free-For-All for Brands

Brought to you by Marketing Automation Software by Marketo

 

How Much Does Social Marketing Really Cost? The Case of Nestle

22 Oct

Most companies involved with social media are quite interested in keeping costs under control — and ensuring that those costs result in real benefits to those firms.

With this mind, take a look at the infographic prepared by Percolate, a firm that uses software to connect and automate key marketing tasks:

“Across both B2B and B2C, the largest challenge digital marketers face is reaching their audiences with relevant content. Now that content has become the core vehicle for brands to connect with their audiences, it’s imperative marketers seek efficient, cost-effective content workflows to engage their audiences – which have fragmented across mobile and social.”

“At a 2014 AdAge Digital Conference, Nestle revealed that its teams produce more than 1,500 pieces of marketing content each day for its 800+ Facebook pages. What type of investment does that entail? We broke down the expected costs with our content partner Visual.ly to give you a full idea of what a Fortune 100 company like Nestle might spend on content marketing.”

 

 

Derek Jeter Post-Retirement: A Marketing Superstar Evolves

20 Oct

Now that the New York Yankees’ Derek Jeter has retired after a Hall of Fame career and the adulation of fans, he is focusing on his future. His marketing past — and present — has been pretty impressive (endorsement deals with Nike, Ford, Gatorade, Rawlings, Steiner Sports, Movado, Avon, and more).

Jeter’s marketing future is being meticulously planned and some projects have already been launched, just a short time after his September 2014 retirement. As Tom Van Riper reports for Forbes,

“Fenway may well prove to be the site not of a true retirement, but merely the final pit stop of a career transition. For all the millions Jeter has pocketed as a player, the real money is still ahead of him, ready for the taking. Statistically, Jeter is a borderline top 100 all-time player, plenty good enough to qualify for the Hall of Fame. His standing with the press and the public, though, reaches well beyond that. The reasons are easy enough to grasp: big market, iconic team, five rings, no PEDs, years of consistency, and, by all appearances, a modest, team-oriented player. A throwback in the age of the gyrating, ‘look at me’ athlete. Whether it’s straight endorsements or equity-based deals, ‘He’ll have offers thrown at him by companies that want to use his name,’ says Ryan Schinman, CEO of Platinum Rye Entertainment, a company that brokers deals between celebrities and corporations. ‘Jeter could make hundreds of millions post-career.’”

Jeter’s first big post-career project is The Player’s Tribune.

It’s also on Twitter.

And Facebook, of course!

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,977 other followers

%d bloggers like this: