Tag Archives: experiental marketing

Derek Jeter Post-Retirement: A Marketing Superstar Evolves

20 Oct

Now that the New York Yankees’ Derek Jeter has retired after a Hall of Fame career and the adulation of fans, he is focusing on his future. His marketing past — and present — has been pretty impressive (endorsement deals with Nike, Ford, Gatorade, Rawlings, Steiner Sports, Movado, Avon, and more).

Jeter’s marketing future is being meticulously planned and some projects have already been launched, just a short time after his September 2014 retirement. As Tom Van Riper reports for Forbes,

“Fenway may well prove to be the site not of a true retirement, but merely the final pit stop of a career transition. For all the millions Jeter has pocketed as a player, the real money is still ahead of him, ready for the taking. Statistically, Jeter is a borderline top 100 all-time player, plenty good enough to qualify for the Hall of Fame. His standing with the press and the public, though, reaches well beyond that. The reasons are easy enough to grasp: big market, iconic team, five rings, no PEDs, years of consistency, and, by all appearances, a modest, team-oriented player. A throwback in the age of the gyrating, ‘look at me’ athlete. Whether it’s straight endorsements or equity-based deals, ‘He’ll have offers thrown at him by companies that want to use his name,’ says Ryan Schinman, CEO of Platinum Rye Entertainment, a company that brokers deals between celebrities and corporations. ‘Jeter could make hundreds of millions post-career.’”

Jeter’s first big post-career project is The Player’s Tribune.

It’s also on Twitter.

And Facebook, of course!

 

Social Media Use Growing for SMBs

11 Oct

With the immense popularity of social media, more and more SMBs (small and medium businesses) are now utilizing such media. It’s not just for the big firms anymore.

According to BIA/Kelsey’s most recent “Local Commerce Monitor” (July 2014), which is ongoing research on the advertising behavior of SMBs), about three-quarters of the firms said they are using social media to promote their businesses — “more than any other category of media.”

BIA/Kelsey reported that:

“Facebook dominates SMB usage, with 55.1 percent of SMBs reporting they have a Facebook page for business use, and 20.0 percent reporting they have run a Facebook ad or promoted post. At the same time, strong showings by other platforms, including LinkedIn, Pinterest, Instagram, and Twitter’s promoted tweets, indicate the social space is highly robust for SMB marketing. SMBs reported spending 21.4 percent of their total media budget on social media in the past 12 months.”

“The survey covers over 35 different media and platforms used by SMBs for advertising and promotion. These media fall into 10 top-level media categories: online (e.g., search, display ads, blogs); traditional (e.g., direct mail, newspapers); mobile (e.g., search, SMS, display); local coupons (print and online); social (e.g., Facebook, Twitter); video (e.g., Web site videos, YouTube); broadcast; local directories (print and online); giveaway items; and community sponsorships.”

Here is an infographic summary.
 

 

Social Media Etiquette Tips for Business

9 Oct

It is not just consumers (people) who need to understand and utilize the proper style and good manners with each social media format. This is also true for businesses! Proper style and etiquette will enable us all to make our desired points while still being civil and polite while doing so. :-)

As Jennifer Landry, a Web journalist who specializes in articles about business management and the current social media landscape, notes for BLUE by Cox Communications:

“Of course, you can’t employ the same methods for the different social platforms. Each site offers users a different experience. Twitter users want quick and casual communication while Linkedin users expect professional and well researched conversation. In order to get the most out of these sites, you’ll need to make sure that you understand what users expect from each platform and how to mold your posts to suit that need. In general, the posts that do the best are ones that either entertain or inform others.”

“Besides following the basic style of each social site, you must make sure you follow the unwritten etiquette rules. While they might seem like common sense, you’d be surprised how often companies do not follow them. If you can understand and implement the information from the infographic below into your campaigns, you’ll be more likely to attract new followers to your profiles and keep your old ones interested.”

Here is a good infographic from Landry’s article.
 

 

Meet the NEW Family — A JWT Intelligence Report

1 Oct

We know that families and households around the world have been changing for decades — in terms of demographics, lifestyles, shopping behavior, and more. Do marketers fully get all of these changes?

There is an interesting and eye-opening new report from JWT Intelligence:

“The notion of family is rapidly evolving, but many brands aren’t yet portraying the new reality of today’s families or fully speaking to their needs. Marriage is no longer a given in many parts of the world, nor are children; at the same time, gay couples are embracing these milestones as attitudes and laws change. Meanwhile, as people live longer, more are forming new families in later decades, and households are expanding to include multiple generations. On the other end of the spectrum, more people are living in households of one, forming families out of friends or even treating pets as family. This report spotlights what’s driving these trends, supporting data and examples of how marketers are responding.”

 

 

Snapchat Hits Three: Here’s an Infographic Timeline

28 Sep

It has certainly been an interesting ride for Snapchat since its September 2011 founding: “Enjoy fast and fun mobile conversation! Snap a photo or a video, add a caption, and send it to a friend. They’ll view it, laugh, and then the Snap disappears.”

Here is a detailed infographic timeline of Snapchat by DPFOC Online Marketing.
 

 

Capitalizing on the Power of Social Media Review Sites

23 Sep

We have written a lot about the power of social media — both good and bad. For example, see these recent posts: 1, 2, 3. So, what more can we do to capitalize on the power of social media review sites?

According to Paula Andruss, writing for Entrepreneur, there are six things to consider doing:

  1. Develop a detail-loaded presence. “Whether you’re initiating a new profile or ‘claiming’ one that’s already on the Web, it’s important to fill out your listing as fully and accurately as possible. To optimize your SEO, it is important to have one standard and accurate listing on every site that mentions your company; if your listing varies among sites, it may be pushed down in search results.”
  2. Read the fine print. “Michael Dash, president of New York-based CarPartKings.com, relies heavily on review sites to validate his company and let users know what to expect from his service. But after purchasing a yearly program with an industry-specific ratings site, he found that as traffic to his E-commerce business increased, so did the charges to keep the reviews coming — rising from $50 per month to $1,000. Within a day of refusing to pay the increased rate, all of his positive reviews disappeared, while the negative ones remained. ‘We learned our lesson the hard way,’ Dash says.”
  3. Accrue reviews and keep them fresh. “Establishing a listing is not enough; you need to solidify your presence by gathering as many reviews as possible. While the algorithms used to determine your company’s placement on these sites is mysterious at best, having a greater number of reviews can improve your landing results over competitors on the results page of a local search.”
  4. Avoid filter triggers. “One of the biggest frustrations with review sites is that they can (and do) filter legitimate reviews so that they may be hard to find — or even removed — based on individual site parameters. Yelp’s policy states that it will filter reviews it believes have been solicited. Yelp and other sites also commonly filter comments from people who have written only a single review; those that are too glowing, which may appear fake; and even those that are too negative, because they may have been written by a competitor.”
  5. Respond carefully to bad or false reviews. “Poor reviews can hurt, but it’s important to respond in a calm and professional manner. Factually incorrect reviews are another problem, but the complaint system to have them removed is difficult and often unsuccessful. So it may be preferable to simply continue to collect reviews so that the questionable ones are outweighed.”
  6. Invest wisely. “As long as your business is operating smoothly, consider enlisting the help of services that might make these sites work better for you. For example, Bazaarvoice Express automatically requests reviews from customers that can be posted on your site, and Moz has a tool that will standardize local listings on major aggregators for about $50 per year.”

Click the image to read the full article by Andruss.
 

 Image credit: Theispot.com/Leon Mussche

 

Great Advice from Successful Business Founders

22 Sep

Our most popular post to date — by far — has been The Best Advice Received — and Passed On — by Leaders of Industry.” That post referred to advice by some of our best-known business “luminaries,” who have managed large firms.

However, there is also quite A LOT that we can learn from the entrepreneurs who have introduced and managed successful businesses that started out quite small.

Recently, Entrepreneur‘s Matt Villano interviewed several company founders and titled the article: “The Best Business Advice You’ll Ever Get.” [Notice the similarity in the title of our earlier post. :-) ] As Villano notes:

“Being an entrepreneur doesn’t mean you have to go it alone. Most successful business owners will tell you they could not have accomplished their goals without help — from a mentor, colleague, even mom and dad. For many, their ability to evaluate, internalize, and act on the counsel they received was instrumental in getting their companies off the ground. In an effort to tap some of this wisdom, we called on business gurus to tell us the very best piece of advice they’ve received. From hiring to philanthropy and more, their responses were as varied as the companies they run.”

These are some the executives whom Villano interviewed and who provided advice:

  • Dennis Crowley, CEO, Foursquare
  • Rick Alden, Founder, Skullcandy
  • Petera Relan, Founder, 9+
  • Sheila Johnson, Founder and CEO, Salamander Hotels & Resorts
  • Melinda Emerson, Founder and CEO, Quintessence Group
  • Christine Day, CEO, Luvo
  • Rehan Choudhry, Founder, Life is Beautiful
  • Reece Pacheco, Founder, Shelby.tv
  • Nick Lazaris, President and CEO, Coravin

Click Dennis Crowley’s photo to read Villano’s full interviews.
 

Photo © Ewan Burns

 

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