Tag Archives: customer satisfaction

A Fun Quiz: What Is YOUR Shopping Personality?

26 Mar

Do you like/love to shop — or hate to shop? Do you spend time comparison shopping — or buy whatever is readily available? Are you an impulse shopper drawn to sales and special displays — or a careful planner who sticks to a shopping list? Your answers to these and other questions help determine your “shopping personality.”

Inquire.net has put together a fun quiz to determine your shopping quiz. It is somewhat tongue in cheek!!

Click the image to access the quiz. You will get feedback if you complete the quiz and click “submit.”
 

 

How Should Companies Respond to Tweets on Twitter?

25 Mar

With the growing popularity of Twitter as a business communications platform, companies have various decisions to make — including these: Does every tweet mentioning the firm’s name require a response? How should firms respond to positive tweets? To negative tweets? How fast should a firm post its response to a tweet?

LeadSift (“Our technology sifts through massive amounts of social data so brands can easily identify customers and engage with them in context.”) recently conducted an important research project on these topics:

“Is it better to answer an irate customer on Twitter, or take the conversation to E-mail? Should you include happy faces in your tweets, or keep them professional? There is no end to the questions that businesses have when developing their Twitter engagement strategy, so we decided to help. LeadSift examined over 10,000 randomly selected interactions from brands and small and medium-sized businesses on the LeadSift platform to see what works, and what doesn’t, when engaging with customers. Take a look at the following infographic for 10 research-backed ways to improve your Twitter customer engagement.”

And click the infographic to read a lot more.
 

 

Why People Unfollow Brands on Social Media

14 Mar

Clearly, a key company and individual goal is to have people “like” their social media efforts enough that they become loyal to those efforts. When too many followers abandon social media sites, there is a big problem for marketers.

So, why do people “unfollow” brands? If we can understand the reasons, we can improve our social media approach.

As Andrea Lehr writes for HubSpot:

“One of the most important things a brand can do is understand its target audience. What do they worry about? Where do they hang out? How do they prefer to interact with brands?”

“When they dive into answering these questions, many businesses discover that social media are a goldmine for their marketing efforts. Not only are social networks a popular place for people to hang out on, but also consumers expect brands to have a presence on social media. (And when people follow a brand on Twitter, 72% of followers are more likely to make a future purchase from that brand.)”

To capitalize on these trends, businesses focus on getting new followers in the door – but that’s not all you should be concerned about. Just because you’ve convinced someone to follow your company’s account doesn’t mean they’ll stay. In today’s competitive market, retention is crucial. So what causes people to stop following brands on twitter? BuzzStream and Fractl conducted a survey with more than 900 respondents to better understand why.”

The survey revealed three main reasons for people unfollowing brands: (1) Too much of content is self-promotional or uninteresting. (2) There is too much emphasis on automated messaging; and too little emphasis on personal engagement. (3) Hashtags and platform-specific symbols are used improperly.
 
Click the image to read more from HubSpot.
 

 

A New Golden Age for Marketing?

10 Mar

The modern field of marketing has had a nice long run — and steadily evolved along with technology and customer trends. So, has the marketing discipline peaked or are the best times still ahead?

According to McKinsey’s Jonathan Gordon and Jesko Perrey, we are entering “the dawn of marketing’s new golden age. Marketers are boosting their precision, broadening their scope, moving more quickly, and telling better stories.”

To summarize Gordon and Perrey:

“Science has permeated marketing for decades. Fans of the television drama Mad Men saw a fictionalized encounter when an IBM System/360 mainframe computer physically displaced the creative department of a late-1960s advertising agency. In reality, though, the 1960s through the early 1990s witnessed a happy marriage of advertising and technology as marketers mastered both the medium of television and the science of Nielsen ratings. These years gave birth to iconic advertising messages in categories ranging from sparkling beverages (‘I’d like to buy the world a Coke’) to credit cards (‘American Express. Don’t leave home without it’) to air travel (‘British Airways: the world’s favourite airline’).”

“Until recently, marketers could be forgiven for looking back wistfully at this golden age as new forces reshaped their world into something completely different. These new trends include a massive proliferation of television and online channels, the transformation of the home PC into a retail channel, the unrelenting rise of mobile social media and gaming, and—with all these trends—a constant battle for the consumer’s attention.”

“The resulting expansion of platforms has propelled consistent growth in marketing expenditures, which now total as much as $1 trillion globally. The efficacy of this spending is under deep scrutiny. For example, in a survey of CEOs, close to three out of four agreed with the following statement: marketers ‘are always asking for more money, but can rarely explain how much incremental business this money will generate.’ Chief marketing officers (CMOs), it appears, don’t disagree: in another recent survey, just over one-third said they had quantitatively proved the impact of their marketing outlays. Paradoxically, though, CEOs are looking to their CMOs more than ever, because they need top-line growth and view marketing as a critical lever to help them achieve it. Can marketers deliver amid ongoing performance pressures?”

Click the image to read a LOT more.
 

 

Using Database Marketing to Target Loyal Customers: A Small Business Guide

1 Mar

by Joel R. Evans and Barry Berman

As we noted last month, too many firms concentrate on how to woo new customers and do not pay enough attention to what they can do to gain the loyalty and increased patronage of their current customers. One of the ways to improve this situation is to develop a customer database and use it to better communicate with these customers.

WHAT IS DATABASE MARKETING? It is a way of collecting, storing, and using pertinent information about customers. Although customer databases are often associated with computerized management information systems, they may also be used by small firms that are not computerized. 

Here is an illustration of how a small, non-computerized firm can rather easily set up and utilize a customer data base: 

  1. People could be asked for their names, addresses, telephone numbers, and product interests by having forms and pencils available at the checkout counter. They could be encouraged to provide the data by offering a monthly raffle and awarding a low-value prize to the winner.
  2. The customer information gathered in step 1 would be entered onto large index cards. The company would alphabetize the cards and keep them in a filing cabinet.
  3. Once customers have filled out forms, they would be asked for their names on each subsequent trip to the store. Thus, information in the database files would be updated from the sales receipts.
  4. Separate special mailings could be targeted at regular customers and at noncustomers in the database.

By adhering to the preceding procedures, a firm could learn more about its most important customers and treat them better. For example, in many situations, some version of the 80-20 principle probably applies, whereby 80 percent of sales are made to 20 per- cent of customers. With database marketing, a firm could identify those 20 percent and better satisfy them through superior product selection, announcements of special sales, personal attention, etc. In addition, the firm could identify and place heightened emphasis on the next 40 percent of its customers, a group that has often been ignored by companies.

Via database marketing, a retailer could also determine which customers are no longer shopping with that firm and which customers are shopping less often. In these instances, people may be called– in a cordial manner–to find out why they are no longer shopping with the company (or shopping less). Based on the explanations given, the firm could then offer special promotions geared directly to those people.

Research studies have repeatedly shown that people will patronize a firm with which they have been unhappy if they are given the opportunity to voice their opinions (which may be complaints), they are listened to in a courteous manner, and they feel that a firm has responded to their concerns. By no means are those customers “lost causes.” In fact, properly dealing with the customers who have had gripes might lead to even stronger loyalty by them to the firm.

What’s the key to successful database marketing? It must be viewed in a positive way as a beneficial tool, and not as an unwelcome and burdensome chore. KNOWLEDGE IS POWER; AND POWER LEADS TO PROFITS.
 

See How Well You Can Do on This Entertaining Marketing Quiz

27 Feb

Are you a smart marketer? How smart? :-)

Here’s a fun quiz from Chief Marketer. Click the icon to access: “ARE YOU A PROMOTION MARKETING PRO OR SCHMO? Take this quiz to find out if you are the ultimate Chief PROMO Marketer. Get 5 out of 5 correct and be entered to win either a $25 or $50 Starbucks gift card!”
 

 

New Adidas App for “Sneakerheads”

12 Feb

There are millions and millions of apps out there — some better than others. :-) One clever new app is from Adidas, called Confirmed.

As described by Kyle Stock for Bloomberg:

“Are limited-edition sneakers still special when buyers can reserve them via an app, like a pizza or a pair of movie tickets? Adidas hopes so. The German sportswear giant just launched Confirmed, a mobile platform that will let sneakerheads skip the long lines at Foot Locker, obscure shoe lotteries, and the occasional disturbance of the peace that come with the sale of a rare pair of shoes. ‘You hear a lot of chatter and frustration that the existing system is somehow rigged for friends of friends or VIP customers,’ said Simon Atkins, the company’s vice president of brand activation. ‘We saw a real opportunity to change the paradigm with customers.'”

“Here’s how it works: Consumers who download the app, register with personal details, and allow push notifications from Adidas will get offers to reserve limited-edition shoes and apparel as they become available. Those who respond first are given the right to buy the products at a certain time and place, both in Adidas-owned stores and other retailers.”

Click the image to read more by Stock.
 

A pair of Adidas “Year of the Goat” sneakers celebrating the Chinese New Year that go on sale on Feb. 19 for $130.


 

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