Tag Archives: customer satisfaction

Branding and Millennials

17 Oct

As we have written before, millennials represent a very large and distinctive market segment — in the United States and around the world. In setting a brand strategy to best appeal to this group, various factors must be kept in mind.

In a recent study (Debunking the Millennial Myth: Initiative’s Global Research Study), Initiative – a U.K.-based media planning and buying agency — “examined the lives of 10,000 25-34 year olds in 19 countries, finding out about their lives, their mindset, how they use technology, and how they feel about brands.”

CLICK HERE here to download the full report. (Note: A short login form must be completed to access the report.)

A summary of the report has been published by MarketingCharts:

“Three in 10 millennials (aged 25-34) around the world are cynical about the way brands market to them, and that figure rises above 40% in the U.S. and U.K., finds Initiative in a new study. With such skepticism evident, brands should demonstrate their commitment to social causes and emphasize attributes such as authenticity and trustworthiness. [This] can be seen as directly related to the skepticism that many millennials hold for brands. But, they also align with some of millennials’ common traits: Millennials’ economic uncertainty and insecurity, for example, means that they appreciate brands that are useful to them and can emotionally connect with them in an authentic way.”

Click the chart to read more of the summary.

 

 

Meet the NEW Family — A JWT Intelligence Report

1 Oct

We know that families and households around the world have been changing for decades — in terms of demographics, lifestyles, shopping behavior, and more. Do marketers fully get all of these changes?

There is an interesting and eye-opening new report from JWT Intelligence:

“The notion of family is rapidly evolving, but many brands aren’t yet portraying the new reality of today’s families or fully speaking to their needs. Marriage is no longer a given in many parts of the world, nor are children; at the same time, gay couples are embracing these milestones as attitudes and laws change. Meanwhile, as people live longer, more are forming new families in later decades, and households are expanding to include multiple generations. On the other end of the spectrum, more people are living in households of one, forming families out of friends or even treating pets as family. This report spotlights what’s driving these trends, supporting data and examples of how marketers are responding.”

 

 

Good Versus Bad B2B Clients: An Infographic

29 Sep

Whether B2C or B2B in nature, there are both “good” and  “bad” customers. Good customers have reasonable expectations and do not seek to take advantage of their sellers (and vice versa!). Bad customers can make unreasonable demands and try to squeeze sellers so they don’t make a profit.

Geek Powered Studios, a Web design and SEO firm, offers some very insightful observations on this topic with regard to the B2B arena:

“Even though every client is different, the best-case scenario for any business partnership is one that’s beneficial for both you and the client. You get to do what you do best, so they can gain more business doing what they do best. At the end of the day, you both want their company to be successful. But that can be tough to achieve if you’re always working against each other.”

“As you take on more business, you’ll learn the needs and preferences of each client and their industry. You’re also going to meet a wide variety of client personalities – from the ones who don’t check in for weeks to the ones who micromanage your every click. There will be clients who listen to your suggestions and provide feedback, but there will be others who are never satisfied and expect to be #1 overnight. Some clients may even threaten to drop their contract and just do it themselves, but they should keep in mind that only 11% of businesses who do their own SEO in-house are satisfied with the results.”

Here’s an infographic on good versus bad B2B customers from Geek Powered Studios.
 

 

Snapchat Hits Three: Here’s an Infographic Timeline

28 Sep

It has certainly been an interesting ride for Snapchat since its September 2011 founding: “Enjoy fast and fun mobile conversation! Snap a photo or a video, add a caption, and send it to a friend. They’ll view it, laugh, and then the Snap disappears.”

Here is a detailed infographic timeline of Snapchat by DPFOC Online Marketing.
 

 

Capitalizing on the Power of Social Media Review Sites

23 Sep

We have written a lot about the power of social media — both good and bad. For example, see these recent posts: 1, 2, 3. So, what more can we do to capitalize on the power of social media review sites?

According to Paula Andruss, writing for Entrepreneur, there are six things to consider doing:

  1. Develop a detail-loaded presence. “Whether you’re initiating a new profile or ‘claiming’ one that’s already on the Web, it’s important to fill out your listing as fully and accurately as possible. To optimize your SEO, it is important to have one standard and accurate listing on every site that mentions your company; if your listing varies among sites, it may be pushed down in search results.”
  2. Read the fine print. “Michael Dash, president of New York-based CarPartKings.com, relies heavily on review sites to validate his company and let users know what to expect from his service. But after purchasing a yearly program with an industry-specific ratings site, he found that as traffic to his E-commerce business increased, so did the charges to keep the reviews coming — rising from $50 per month to $1,000. Within a day of refusing to pay the increased rate, all of his positive reviews disappeared, while the negative ones remained. ‘We learned our lesson the hard way,’ Dash says.”
  3. Accrue reviews and keep them fresh. “Establishing a listing is not enough; you need to solidify your presence by gathering as many reviews as possible. While the algorithms used to determine your company’s placement on these sites is mysterious at best, having a greater number of reviews can improve your landing results over competitors on the results page of a local search.”
  4. Avoid filter triggers. “One of the biggest frustrations with review sites is that they can (and do) filter legitimate reviews so that they may be hard to find — or even removed — based on individual site parameters. Yelp’s policy states that it will filter reviews it believes have been solicited. Yelp and other sites also commonly filter comments from people who have written only a single review; those that are too glowing, which may appear fake; and even those that are too negative, because they may have been written by a competitor.”
  5. Respond carefully to bad or false reviews. “Poor reviews can hurt, but it’s important to respond in a calm and professional manner. Factually incorrect reviews are another problem, but the complaint system to have them removed is difficult and often unsuccessful. So it may be preferable to simply continue to collect reviews so that the questionable ones are outweighed.”
  6. Invest wisely. “As long as your business is operating smoothly, consider enlisting the help of services that might make these sites work better for you. For example, Bazaarvoice Express automatically requests reviews from customers that can be posted on your site, and Moz has a tool that will standardize local listings on major aggregators for about $50 per year.”

Click the image to read the full article by Andruss.
 

 Image credit: Theispot.com/Leon Mussche

 

Cereal Continues to Lose Its Popularity

20 Sep

Are you a cereal eater these days? Did you used to be? What can marketers do today to increase your cereal consumption? :-)

As Stephanie Strom reports for the New York Times:

“Cereal consumption peaked in the mid-1990s, according to the NPD Group, a consumer research firm. Still, some 90 percent of American households report buying ready-to-eat cereal, which remains the largest category of breakfast food with some $10 billion in sales last year, according to Euromonitor, down from $13.9 billion in 2000. And the consumer research firm estimates sales will fall further this year to $9.7 billion.”

“The cereal business has been declining, as consumers reach for granola bars, yogurt, and drive-through fare in the morning. And the drop-off has accelerated lately, especially among those finicky millennials who tend to graze on healthy options — even if Cheerios and some other brands come in whole-grain varieties fortified with protein now.”

 

Click the New York Times’ chart to read more.
 
Cereal
 

Are Microsoft and Minecraft a Good Fit?

17 Sep

Mojang, the maker of the highly popular Minecraft video game, has reached an agreement to be acquired by Microsoft. The purchase price is $2.5 billion. The deal is important to both Mojang and Microsoft, the maker of Xbox.

As Mojang posted at its Web site:

“Yes, we’re being bought by Microsoft. Yes, the deal is real. Mojang is being bought by Microsoft. It was reassuring to see how many of your opinions mirrored those of the Mojangstas when we heard the news. Change is scary, and this is a big change for all of us. It’s going to be good though. Everything is going to be OK. Please remember that the future of Minecraft and you – the community – are extremely important to everyone involved. If you take one thing away from this post, let it be that. We can only share so much information right now, but we’ve decided that being as honest as possible is the best approach. We’re still working a lot of this stuff out. Mega-deals are serious business.”

And in this YouTube video, head of Xbox Phil Spencer discusses Microsoft’s acquisition of Minecraft and Microsoft’s respect and admiration for the Minecraft community.
 

 
But, when the acquisition  is completed, the hard part starts — blending the Mojang culture with that of Microsoft. As Evelyn M. Rusli and Shira Ovide write for the Wall Street Journal: 

News that Microsoft is acquir[ing] Swedish company Mojang AB up a clash of cultures between the corporate giant and Minecraft loyalists — spanning from middle-school children to video-game diehards. To many of its fans, Mojang’s antiestablishment swagger has always been part of Minecraft’s mystique. Mojang, which has only about 40 employees, is run by programmer Markus Persson, who has gained a cult following by publicly blasting big tech companies, including Microsoft, Electronic Arts, and Facebook.  Microsoft, pushing 40 and worth about $387 billion, is seen as the software industry’s Goliath.”

“Already, there are signs that a Minecraft game under Microsoft will be different. According to people with knowledge of the matter, Mr. Persson is expected to leave Mojang if Microsoft completes a deal. The company’s game-development office in Stockholm isn’t expected to move or close, a person familiar with the deal negotiations said. On online forums such as Reddit and Twitter, many players questioned whether a sale would destroy the game’s indie spirits. ‘Why pay $2.5 billion for something just to alienate all the fans?’ wrote a Reddit user who goes by the handle Joebovi.”

 
 What do YOU think?
 

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