Tag Archives: customer expectations

How Brands Can Do Better on Vine

25 Jul

Vine is “the best way to see and share life in motion. Create short, beautiful, looping videos in a simple and fun way for your friends and family to see.” It has about 50 million users, many of whom are teenagers, who are attracted to the six-second videos.

Stephanie Castillo, a digital marketing specialist at Visually, reports that:

“Given its accessibility and low cost, this form of micro-content gives marketers a chance to get some hands-on video production experience. But don’t be fooled: though the app promotes a quick and raw form of capturing video, you shouldn’t take this as a cue to wander away from quality content. Rather, the stakes for a quality video with a strong story are now higher, simply because you have an ever shorter amount of time to get your point across.”

“By now, brands have had the chance to explore the many possibilities with Vine. Let’s take a closer look at five brands that are leveraging Vine in a smart, impactful way for some inspiration on creating micro-videos that capture the attention of your audience.”

Click the image to read Castillo’s multimedia article about Tribeca Film Festival: Contests, General Electric: Corporate Campaigns, Nissan: Product Highlight, USA Today: Narrative, and Lowe’s: DIY and Useful Information.
 

 

Marketing Art at the J. Paul Getty Museum

24 Jul

The J. Paul Getty Museum, located in Los Angeles, Clifornia, is world renowned. Its mission is to: “inspire curiosity about, and enjoyment and understanding of, the visual arts by collecting, conserving, exhibiting, and interpreting works of art of outstanding quality and historical importance.” It “builds collections through purchase and gifts, and develops programs of exhibitions, publications, scholarly research, public education, and the performing arts that engage our diverse local and international audiences.”

The Getty Museum appreciates the importance of marketing. One interesting, marketing-oriented initiative of the Museum is its interactive online discussion of The Life of Art: Context, Collecting, and Display, which is on exhibit at the physical museum:

“Look closely at a work of art and you are likely to uncover clues to a fascinating past and present: an object’s intimate connection to people, places, institutions, and cultures. This exhibition takes four objects from the Museum’s decorative arts collection—a silver fountain, a wall light, a side chair, and a lidded bowl—and encourages you to explore their ‘lives’ through an interactive presentation.”

Click the image to access the interactive online show-and-tell.
 

 

The Changing Constants of Marketing (No, This Is Not an Oxymoron)

18 Jul

We’ve written a lot about the rapidly changing world of marketing — with the advances in social media, technology, big data, etc. So, sometimes, we need to pause and reflect on things that are the constants in marketing.

In 1966, McKinsey published an article by John D. Louth on “The Changing Face of Marketing”: “This article from the McKinsey Quarterly archive analyzes six major changes that promised to transform future marketing efforts. These forces have largely proved to be as influential as predicted and continue to shape today’s challenges.”

The six major changes — which are really marketing constants — are as relevant today as they were nearly 50 years ago:

  1. The dominance of the customer — “It is nearly a truism that the needs and wants of the consumer are the critical issues today in creating new products and services, and developing the accompanying plans to merchandise them at a profit.”
  2. The spread of marketing research — “The second trend is the increased use of marketing research — in terms of both quantity and scope. To an important degree, of course, this trend is a response to the first. If knowledge about future customers is essential, and if the quality of the marketing output is materially affected by the caliber of the informational input, then marketing research is bound to increase in use and contribution as the interest in more scientific marketing grows.”
  3. The rise of the computer — “The third major trend marketing must consider is the emergence of electronic data-processing equipment as a major tool of scientific marketing not only for reporting data but also, more importantly, for planning and control by management.”
  4. Expanded use of test marketing — “A fourth important trend, in my opinion, will be toward more controlled experimentation to narrow the odds of an error in making marketing changes. Two major influences emphasize the need for further expansion of test marketing. The first is the rising cost of marketing changes: the costs, for example, of introducing new products and packaging, of developing new advertising and promotional programs, and of retraining salespeople. The second influence is the mounting investment in product research and development. About half of all corporate research-and-development activity in the United States today is concerned with the creation of new commercial products.”
  5. Metamorphosis of field selling — “The fifth trend I foresee is a shift in the nature of the field-selling job toward a more integrated, profit-oriented marketing effort. Key-account selling is becoming an increasingly crucial feature of the field-sales job—a trend with important implications. In many companies, a key-account selling program may entail special analysis of present and potential customers, and the establishment of related control reports to measure profit results with particular accounts.”
  6. Global market planning — “An ever-broadening application of the marketing concept to worldwide markets is the last of the six broad trends that I believe will change the face of marketing in the next few years. Over the past decade, the marketing concept has become widely accepted in the United States—perhaps, in some situations, too enthusiastically accepted and too indiscriminately applied. Nevertheless, I believe the concept of a completely integrated marketing effort is valid and will be increasingly adopted. In many companies operating worldwide, it will stimulate the development of global market planning.”

Click the image to read the full classic article.
 

 

An Interview with Fashion Legend Diane Von Furstenberg

17 Jul

Diane Von Furstenberg has been a prominent, trend-setting fashion designer for decades. Take a look at the Web site of her company to see what she’s doing now.

Here’s a brief bio of Von Furstenberg by Liz Welch of Inc.:

“Designer Diane von Furstenberg was 27 when she made the first wrap dress in 1974. The iconic design landed her on the cover of Newsweek — and millions of women snapped up her dresses. But when demand faded, von Furstenberg ended up selling most of her licenses to avoid bankruptcy. In 1997, von Furstenberg relaunched her company, which now has annual sales of more than $200 million. The wrap dress, too, made a comeback, and recently celebrated its 40th anniversary with ‘The Journey of the Dress’ exhibition, which traveled the globe. And, as the 68-year-old designer recently shared with Inc. contributing editor Liz Welch, she is focused on building a company to outlast any fad.”

Click Von Furstenberg’s photo to read her recent interview with Liz Welch for Inc.
 

 

Nielsen’s 2014 Breakthrough Award Winners

14 Jul

Research giant Nielsen annually examines thousands of new product introductions.

As part of its analysis, Nielsen has identified its 2014 U.S. Breakthrough Innovation Winners: “These diverse new products carry the common thread of finding and filling unmet consumer needs while demonstrating that with significant effort, game-changing innovation is possible in any category and by all types of companies.” The products are all commonly found in the supermarket.

The winning products were all introduced in 2012. We have inserted direct links to these products:

 

Companies That Have Changed the World

9 Jul

Many companies have had a major impact on business practices and our lives. And a lot of these companies have endured for a century or more.

Recently, Fortune published a list of 27 companies that have changed the world over the last century-plus.

Sorry, Apple fans — but Apple ranks only 16th on the list!

Click the image to see the full list. :-)
 

 

Who Are the Best at Customer Relationship Management (CRM)?

8 Jul

For the tenth year, a major award for the best firms in  CRM has been given by 1to1Media, this time in conjunction with Gartner.

Click here to read a summary about the 2014 Gartner &1to1 Media CRM Excellence awards.

And click the image to read the full report.
 

 

Can You “Pass” This Product Management Quiz? :-)

4 Jul

Happy Fourth of July. Looking for something to do this morning?

Think you know product management? Try out this 10-item quiz.

Let us know how you do. (No cheating: The answers are on slide two.)
 
 

 

How Should You Respond to Negative Social Media Comments?

30 Jun

One of the main social media challenges for all companies is how to respond to negative comments. It is imperative that negative comments be tracked and understood.

In general, there are three options for dealing with negative social media comments: (1) ignore the comments; (2) point out why the comments are wrong; and (3) constructively reply to the comments. Although many firms choose option (1) or (2), it is more appropriate to choose option (3).

As High Powered SEO puts it:

“You have spent hours preparing an amazing post or share something worth a meaningful discussion. Then, you notice that a couple of people are saying the complete opposite from what you have shared. This is normally fine except they express their opinions in a way that may rub you the wrong way. How do you handle this type of situation? Do you lash out in order to get your point across, not respond at all, delete the comment, or just flat-out ignore it?”

“There are plenty of ways you can handle this type of situation, but if you don’t handle it the right way you could be doing much more harm than good. It is best to handle this situation tactfully.”

Check out the infographic of tips from High Powered SEO.
 
RESPOND TO NEGATIVE COMMENTS ON SOCIAL MEDIA AND BLOG POSTS  INFOGRAPHIC
 

The Growing Importance of Generation Z

26 Jun

Our marketing dictionary keeps growing — in this case, we’re talking about consumer typologies. Among them are the Greatest Generation (born 1925-1945), Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964), Baby Busters (born 1965-1975), MTV Generation (1975-1985), Generation X (encompassing Baby Busters and MTV Generation), Generation Y — also known as Millennials (1985-1995), and Generation Z (born 1995-2007).

Now, that the oldest Generation Zers are adults, it is time to pay more attention to this emerging market segment.

One firm that has studied Generation Z in depth is sparks & honey, which has been selected by Advertising Age  as one of the Top Ten Agencies to Watch for 2014.

According to sparks & honey:

“Marketers have been focused on Gen Y (a.k.a. Millennials) for more than a decade. In fact, Millennials are the most researched generation in history! But Gen Z is different from the Millennial generation. In many ways, Gen Zers are the opposites or extreme versions of Millennials and marketers need to adjust to them. We are just beginning to understand Gen Z and its impact on the future.”

Check out the sparks & honey slideshow on Generation Z. Be ready for the future! It is here now.
 

 

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