Tag Archives: career

Body Language Errors to Avoid During Interviews

19 Apr

It is not just WHAT we say during an interview that influences our job prospects. Our prospects also depend on HOW we communicate during an interview. Is our body language good?

Click on the image to take a look at this Forbes’ slideshow on interview body language that covers everything “from eye contact to posture to the way you fix your hair; avoid these 10 physical slip-ups in your next job interview.”
 

 

Resume Tips You Can Use

1 Apr

In this post, let us discuss six aspects of resume design – and provide tips accordingly:

  •   What is the purpose of a resume?

A resume should attract the attention of a prospective employer and interest the prospective employer to invite the applicant to an interview. A resume is NOT the vehicle for a person to present his/her life story. It IS the vehicle to provide the relevant and distinctive background of the applicant.

  •  Should there be an opening summary at the top of the resume?

For two reasons, the answer to this question is yes. One, this immediately lets the prospective employer  recognize the type of job for which the applicant is applying. Two, an opening summary enables the applicant to create his/her self brand and highlight what makes that individual unique.

To learn more about the value of self branding, read here.

  • How should you decide what content to include on the resume?

Although it is essential to include one’s education, work experience, and special skills on a resume, it is also vital not to overwhelm the prospective employer with too much information. The reader will most likely skim the resume and find a densely-worded resume not worth the effort. In addition, by having too much content, the reader is not guided to the most important information.

Here a few specific tips: (1) Ask yourself this question and address it through your resume — What the are the five to ten top reasons why a potential employer should hire me instead of another applicant (your competitive advantages)? (2) Highlight your accomplishments — not just your past job functions. (3) Do NOT place as much emphasis on a job you had five years ago as the one you had most recently. [I am continuously amazed by how many resumes I review for my students and alumni that have as many bullet points for an internship they had as their full-time jobs!!]

  •  How long should your resume be?

Over the years, I have reviewed thousands of resumes. I still firmly believe that one page is sufficient for an applicant at any level of experience. But some others differ and think a slightly longer resume is acceptable IF one is looking for a senior-level position. The following is a very good rule to keep in mind, as provided by Careers Plus Resumes for Careerealism:

“A resume will first receive a very brief scan, often 10-20 seconds, to determine if the candidate appears to meet the major requirements. While the entire resume may be quickly scanned, utilizing a summary of qualifications with keywords and phrases based upon one’s career goal and job target is advantageous. A resume that passes the initial scan will then receive greater scrutiny to determine if a candidate qualifies for an interview. Here, relevant depth and detail in the history is best since the candidate’s experience, skills, and strengths – as they apply to the position – will be more thoroughly assessed.”

  • Is it OK to use one version of a resume for all possible jobs?

NO! NO! NO! In this era of easy-to-adapt Word files, it is inexcusable to use the same resume for all jobs. You want the potential employer to be interested in you. So, show you are interested in them. Tailor your resume to the specific job opening and potential employer. One size does NOT fit all.

Consider these observations from Dawn Rasmussen, writing for Careerealism:

“As we go through our careers, our background evolves into probably at least three or more different thematic areas. In my lifetime, I’ve been a meeting planner, television producer, tourism manager, educator, and resume writer, to name a few. Can I pull all of these areas under one roof/one resume? Not a chance. No one could possibly digest it all – there is too much stuff ‘muddying’ the waters. The trick to hitting a moving target is to get grounded first.”

Focus On One Area

Take a deep breath and think about what area you are actually going to have the highest degree of job search success. Then focus your efforts on that area. I would suggest one, two, but no more than three major areas. Then create a separate document for EACH of those themes.

Create A ‘Relevant History’ Header

Create a section header entitled “RELEVANT HISTORY,” then list the job records most relevant to the position to which you are applying first, then summarize (if necessary) any non-relevant ones to avoid distracting the reader. That way, you can account for any holes that open up in your work experience caused by moving non-relevant history into an “Additional Background” header.
Read more at http://www.careerealism.com/resume-versions-need/#zArwl7fddZdg5oFL.99

Can I pull all of these areas under one roof/one resume?

Not a chance. No one could possibly digest it all – there is too much stuff “muddying” the waters if, say, I were to apply to be a faculty member in a post-secondary school. The trick to hitting those moving target is to get grounded first.

Focus On One Area

Take a deep breath and think about what area you are actually going to have the highest degree of job search success. Then focus your efforts on that area. I would suggest one, two, but no more than three major areas. Then create a separate document for EACH of those themes.

Create A ‘Relevant History’ Header

Create a section header entitled “RELEVANT HISTORY,” then list the job records most relevant to the position to which you are applying first, then summarize (if necessary) any non-relevant ones to avoid distracting the reader. That way, you can account for any holes that open up in your work experience caused by moving non-relevant history into an “Additional Background” header.

“Take a deep breath and think about what area you are actually going to have the highest degree of job search success. Then focus your efforts on that area. I would suggest one, two, but no more than three major areas. Then create a separate document for EACH of those themes. Create a section header entitled ‘RELEVANT HISTORY,’ then list the job records most relevant to the position to which you are applying first, then summarize (if necessary) any non-relevant ones to avoid distracting the reader. That way, you can account for any holes that open up in your work experience caused by moving non-relevant history into an ‘Additional Background’ header.”
  • Does the “look”  of the resume matter?
Yes, it does. These are some typical mistakes to avoid: (1) Do not use an overly small font. (2) Do not have small margins. (3) Do not have spelling or grammatical mistakes. (4) Do not use plain copy paper; use quality paper. (5) Do not use exotic paper colors; stick to white or off-white.

 
 

GOOD LUCK!
[As Branch Rickey, the Brooklyn Dodgers general manager who signed Jackie Robinson to be the first African-American to play Major League Baseball, once said: “Luck is the residue of hard work and design.”]

 

Bouncing Back from Job Rejection

23 Mar

From a professional perspective, one of the toughest events with which we have to cope is job rejection. When (if) this happens to us, we need to get past our feelings of rejection, anger, and inadequacy — and take a proactive approach to “get back in the game.”

Mary Sherwood Sevinsky, a career consultant, writing for Careerealism offers eight tips to follow when dealing with job rejection:

1. Set Realistic Goals

“Long-term goals give you something to look forward to. Short-term goals ensure you are moving in the right direction and moving to your long term goals. Daily goals will get you out of bed in the morning.”

2. Do Your Best

“Take the time to try to match your resume or application details to what the employer is looking for. That way, you will be one of the few selected for an interview (and hired!). The extra effort and time has value, and they can help you will feel like you are really doing something meaningful.”

3. Change the Things You Do Each Day

“Search for jobs one day, follow up another, identify companies to cold call once a week, network one day, visit companies in person periodically. Don’t forget to eat, sleep, get dressed, exercise, and go outside every day. Make your own schedule and stick to it!”

4. Make Sure You Have the Necessary Skills

“Read blogs, articles, and/or books about career planning and job searching. Explore your field or potential occupations to determine if you need more skills to be competitive. Read articles related to your desired job or about job searching and interviewing every day.”

5. Have a Support Group

“You can’t do it alone. Ask for help outside of the family if need be. Reach out friends, ex-coworkers, and church or community members. You need someone to listen to your ideas and give you feedback.”

6. Network

“You probably know how to network, but maybe you are too dispirited or you don’t see the value in it. Nonetheless, it is a necessity and can result in your next job if you make the time and effort to contact and maintain connection with others. Join a civic group or one at your local career placement office, or volunteer. It is most important to start and continue to get out there and meet people – maintain your connections!”

7. Get Creative

“If you feel that you MUST have a specific position or salary before considering a job, you may be missing out on some great prospects! Purchase a real newspaper (or look at every job board posting within a 20 mile area or less) and look at every job. If you do this intermittently, you will have a better indication of what jobs are offered and you may discover a new direction that is perfect for you!”

8. Be Realistic

“You may want to think about moving to where there are jobs. Think about places in that you would like to live or parts of the country where people you know currently live. Search for jobs in those areas periodically to see if it makes sense to start a job search in another area in addition to your current one.”

Click the image to read more.
 

Photo from Shutterstock


 

At Work, Be a GREAT Colleague

12 Mar

All of us need to understand our roles and functions in the companies for which we work. We should want both our bosses and peers to view us in a favorable light and perceive us as great colleagues.

As Officevibe notes:

“Let’s face it, we all have been around (or have been) someone in a workplace who just doesn’t want to be there. You can see right off the bat what type of traits disengaged employees have just by talking to them in the office for a bit. Now, by definition disengaged employees are people who don’t care for their company and have no intention of helping it grow; so they can be quite harmful if they’re within your office.”

Don’t let yourself fall into the negative roles highlighted in this infographic.
 
13 Personality Traits Of A Disengaged EmployeeThis infographic was crafted with love by Officevibe, the employee engagement platform that helps managers see the ROI of company culture while making employees happier and more motivated at work.
 

2015 Student Opportunities from Marketing Edge

9 Mar

Opportunities from Marketing EDGE

Hello,

My name is Rachel Fontana and I am the Assistant Program Manager at Marketing EDGE. Marketing EDGE is a nonprofit organization dedicated to educating, developing, growing, and employing college students in the field of marketing.

I am thrilled to announce that Marketing EDGE and Google are currently recruiting high achieving marketing students for our Interactive Marketing Immersion Xperience (I-MIX) program.

I-MIX immerses a select group of college students nationwide in seminars and workshops focused on interactive marketing. Our presenters, mostly Google staff members, will share information about what they do and provide advice on how to prepare for a successful career in the field. Furthermore, participants will have an opportunity to attend a career and resume workshop led by a premier career coach, to network with experienced marketing executives, and to compete in an interactive marketing campaign challenge.

Our 2015 I-MIX program will take place on Google’s Mountain View campus from May 30th through June 3rd.

This truly unique marketing intensive presents students with a chance to…

  • Visit Google’s main campus
  • Participate in company specific workshops and get insights into major marketing campaigns and strategies directly from top Google executives
  • Develop a better understanding of new and evolving marketing platforms: mobile, social, and search
  • Receive resume critique that will help prepare them for the tough job market ahead
  • Work on a practical marketing business case
  • Interact and network with marketing students and marketing professionals from across the country

We would love to engage your undergraduate marketing students in this year’s program and would appreciate you sharing this information with them.

All students wishing to submit their online application before the quickly approaching April 3rd deadline may do so via the following link: www.marketingedge.org/marketing-programs/imix-summer-program/imix-application.

If you or your students have any questions regarding our 2015 I-MIX program, please see the I-MIX information page or contact me directly at RFontana@marketingEDGE.org.
 
Marketing EDGE - I-MIX 2015_Page_1

Marketing EDGE - I-MIX 2015_Page_2
 

Self-Branding for Personal and Career Success

26 Feb

We hear a lot about self-branding these days. This interview will not only help you understand self-branding, it will help you use it as a tool for personal and professional success.

In this CoSozo “Psych Up” show, Dr. Joel Evans, author and Distinguished Professor in the Zarb School of Business at Hofstra University returns to Psych Up to draw upon his extensive experience teaching and blogging on self-branding. He invites listeners to think through steps of self-reflection to identify qualities that translate into brands.

In the discussion with Host Dr. Suzanne Phillips, he considers the three aspects of self-branding and the difference between a person’s inherent self-brand and a person’s perceived self-brand. He shares stories that capture the importance of self-branding and offers do’s and dont’s for formulating a personal self-brand.

When applying self-branding to the professional arena, Dr. Evans offers invaluable tips for tailoring your self-brand to the job being offered and as a platform for your resume and interview preparation. Whether you are looking for a date or a job, you will find this to be a very valuable show.
 

Click below to listen to the interview.

 

 

What Job Skills Will Be Most Important in 2020?

16 Feb

As we plan our future career moves, it is essential to be aware of trends in the job marketplace. For example, what skills should we expect employers to desire in the year 2020?

Consider these observations from YouTern:

“Drivers of change are all around us. A globally connected world, the ability to scale a brand based on a social media post, cross cultural conversations, and a new reliance on digital communication all mean we need to evolve past our industrial age educations and mindsets about work. Welcome to the Social Age.

“As a result, the skills we will be expected to wield just a few years from now – as shown in this marvelous infographic from Top10OnlineColleges.org may look far different than they do now. How skilled are you at social intelligence? How’s your new media literacy? How good are you at virtual collaboration? These are the skills that will be most in demand, and very soon.”

Take a close look at the infographic, and then think ahead.
 
Important Work Skills for 2020
Source: Top10OnlineColleges.org

 

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