Tag Archives: business model

Best Books of 2015 for Entrepreneurs

18 Nov

Thinking of a starting a new business? If the answer is yes, then you need the best information and advice possible. And there are a lot of excellent books out there to choose from and read.

Geoffrey James, an Inc. contributing editor, recently published a top ten list of the best books of 2015 for starting a business:

“2015 could arguably be named the ‘year of the entrepreneur.’ Shark Tank became must-see TV, the SEC allowed regular folks to invest in startups, and Inc.com has become one of the most-visited business websites in the world.”

“Not surprisingly, 2015 had a bumper crop of excellent books for entrepreneurs. That’s a very good thing, because to be useful ‘start your own business’ books must be grounded in the economic reality. In other words, if you’re starting your own business, you need access to the latest and greatest thinking on the subject. With that in mind, here are ten brand-new and updated books that you should read by the end of the year.”

Here is James’ top ten list. Clicking a book title will bring you to Amazon’s page for that book.

  1. The Art of the Start 2.0
  2. Disrupt You!
  3. The End of Jobs
  4. Quit Your Job in 6 Months
  5. Job Escape Plan
  6. The One Page Business Plan
  7. Bold
  8. The School of Greatness
  9. The Entrepreneur Roller Coaster
  10. Think Big, Act Bigger


Bloomberg 2016 Forecasts

10 Nov

About this time each year, a number of well-known, reliable sources produce their forecasts for the  following year.

Bloomberg (via its Bloomberg Businessweek) has just published its “The Year Ahead 2016” issue. Here is a video overview of the year ahead. It is followed by a link to the 50 companies to watch in 2016. Just click the chart to see an online discussion of the 50 companies covered.




24/7 Wall St.: A Valuable Site to Visit

2 Nov

24/7 Wall St. is a very useful site about which you may be unfamiliar. It has articles across all areas of business, top ten lists, and a lot more.

Here’s one interesting area in which 24/7 Wall St. reports:

“Each year, 24/7 Wall St. identifies 10 American brands that we predict will disappear, either through bankruptcies or because of mergers. Bankruptcies of large public companies in 2015 have already exceeded 2014 totals. Similarly, the total value of mergers and acquisitions is projected to hit a record high in 2015. While some of the companies on this list may disappear because they continue to be at the bottom of their industry, some may disappear because they are doing well. Over the years, some of our predictions have been better than others. Some of our predictions — like Alaska Air — have been dead wrong. Other brands we said would disappear — like Aeropostale — have survived but are still failing companies. Blockbuster, DirecTV, American Apparel, and Sony Ericsson are among the brands that have gone bankrupt or have been acquired since appearing on our list. These brands have not yet disappeared completely, but may still in the near future.”


And here are some specific examples of what 24/7 Wall St. publishes:


Click the image to visit 24/7 Wall St.


Can “Big Soda” Reverse Its Decline?

30 Oct

The major soda (carbonated beverage) marketers are having a tough go of it some locales where sales are saturated. But an even bigger issue is that many people are turning away from soda because of health concerns.

Recently, the New York Times ran a major story entitled: “The Decline of ‘Big Soda”; it reported that “the drop in soda consumption represents the single largest change in the American diet in the last decade.”

In this story, observed that:

“Even as anti-obesity campaigners have failed to pass soda taxes, they have accomplished something larger. In the course of the fight, they have reminded people that soda is not a very healthy product. They have echoed similar messages coming from public health researchers and others — and fundamentally changed the way Americans think about soda. Over the last 20 years, sales of full-calorie soda in the United States have plummeted by more than 25 percent. Soda consumption, which rocketed from the 1960s through 1990s, is now experiencing a serious and sustained decline.”

“Sales are stagnating as a growing number of Americans say they are actively trying to avoid the drinks that have been a mainstay of American culture. Sales of bottled water have shot up, and bottled water is now on track to overtake soda as the largest beverage category in two years, according to at least one industry projection.”

Click the image to read more.

                           Photo by Ruth Fremson/The New York Times


A McKinsey Report: How Innovative Are the Chinese?

26 Oct

McKinsey & Company regularly publishes reports about doing business in China. Click here to visit its McKinsey China Web site.

McKinsey firm has just produced a new report on Chinese innovativeness:

“New research by the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) suggests that to realize consensus growth forecasts—5.5 to 6.5 percent a year—during the coming decade, China must generate two to three percentage points of annual GDP growth through innovation, broadly defined. If it does, innovation could contribute much of the $3 trillion to $5 trillion a year to GDP by 2025. China will have evolved from an ‘innovation sponge,’ absorbing and adapting existing technology and knowledge from around the world, into a global innovation leader.”

“Our analysis suggests that this transformation is possible, though far from inevitable. To date, when we have evaluated how well Chinese companies commercialize new ideas and use them to raise market share and profits and to compete around the world, the picture has been decidedly mixed. China has become a strong innovator in areas such as consumer electronics and construction equipment. Yet in others—creating new drugs or designing automobile engines, for example—the country still isn’t globally competitive. That’s true even though every year it spends more than $200 billion on research (second only to the United States), turns out close to 30,000 Ph.Ds in science and engineering, and leads the world in patent applications (more than 820,000 in 2013).”

“When we look ahead, though, we see broad swaths of opportunity. Our analysis suggests that by 2025, such new innovation opportunities could contribute $1.0 trillion to $2.2 trillion a year to the Chinese economy—or equivalent to up to 24 percent of total GDP growth.”

Click the image to access the full report.


Facebook Cracking Down on Access to Data

28 Sep

There have been a lot of calls by government agencies, consumer groups, and individual users for Facebook to better control the information it provides to third parties. Now, it is taking another step.

As reported by  Deepa Seetharaman and Elizabeth Dwoskin for the  Wall Street Journal:

“Facebook’s restrictions on its user data, which were announced last year and put into effect in May, are rippling through academia, business, and presidential politics. Dozens of startups that had been using Facebook data have shut down, been acquired, or overhauled their businesses. Political consultants are racing to find new ways to tap voters’ social connections ahead of the 2016 presidential election.”

“’Facebook giveth and Facebook taketh away,’ said Nick Soman, who collected the locations of Facebook users’ friends to enhance his anonymous-chat app, Reveal. He later sold the app to music service Rhapsody International Inc. Mr. Soman said he admires Facebook, but learned a lesson about relying on third parties for a key component of his app.”

Click the chart to read more.


Proving Marketing ROI Is Difficult

18 Aug

As we’ve posted before (see, for example, 1, 2), measuring marketing’s return on investment is both important and difficult.

Now, according to B2B Marketing, the situation is changing:

“The old perception of marketing as an immeasurable dark art whose benefits could not be quantified by mere numbers seems to be over. In its place, the new imperative is ‘marketing as science’, where any marketer worth their salt will be able quote brilliant ROI figures for past and future campaigns.”

“While it’s understandable that there should be a desire among marketers to show that investment in their department is having a positive effect on the bottom line, it’s also undoubtedly true that lots of practitioners are still struggling to do this. What’s the problem? Are marketers’ ROI formulas outdated? Are situational differences disrupting the playing field? Are businesses measuring marketing contributions in the right way?”

Click the image below for some solutions related to better measuring marketing ROI.




Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,806 other followers

%d bloggers like this: