Tag Archives: business model

Derek Jeter Post-Retirement: A Marketing Superstar Evolves

20 Oct

Now that the New York Yankees’ Derek Jeter has retired after a Hall of Fame career and the adulation of fans, he is focusing on his future. His marketing past — and present — has been pretty impressive (endorsement deals with Nike, Ford, Gatorade, Rawlings, Steiner Sports, Movado, Avon, and more).

Jeter’s marketing future is being meticulously planned and some projects have already been launched, just a short time after his September 2014 retirement. As Tom Van Riper reports for Forbes,

“Fenway may well prove to be the site not of a true retirement, but merely the final pit stop of a career transition. For all the millions Jeter has pocketed as a player, the real money is still ahead of him, ready for the taking. Statistically, Jeter is a borderline top 100 all-time player, plenty good enough to qualify for the Hall of Fame. His standing with the press and the public, though, reaches well beyond that. The reasons are easy enough to grasp: big market, iconic team, five rings, no PEDs, years of consistency, and, by all appearances, a modest, team-oriented player. A throwback in the age of the gyrating, ‘look at me’ athlete. Whether it’s straight endorsements or equity-based deals, ‘He’ll have offers thrown at him by companies that want to use his name,’ says Ryan Schinman, CEO of Platinum Rye Entertainment, a company that brokers deals between celebrities and corporations. ‘Jeter could make hundreds of millions post-career.’”

Jeter’s first big post-career project is The Player’s Tribune.

It’s also on Twitter.

And Facebook, of course!

 

Marketing to the Right Segment

14 Oct

Most companies use some form of market segmentation in their strategies. They recognize that they should not try to market to everyone but rather focus on a specific group or groups with offerings and marketing communications targeting a specific segment of customers. BUT, are all companies targeting the right customers — and are they doing so properly? Of course, the answer is no. So, how can we do better?

As Ira Kalb, a professor at the Marshall School of Business (University of Southern California), writes for Business Insider:

“As a first step, businesses should find the right ‘ballpark’ in which to operate. An effective way to begin this process is to do a SWOT analysis. For those that do not already know, SWOT is an acronym for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats.”

“While you already have to have some idea of the market opportunities you want to pursue when you do the SWOT analysis, it is very important to define the marketplace your company is going to target. This may require some trial and error experimentation. Defining the right market follows the Goldilocks and the Three Bears metaphor. If the market you define is too big, you will be wasting your marketing resources trying to cover it. If it is too small, you will not make enough money (based on the share of the market you can capture). You need to define your market so it is just right. That is, you’ll make enough money to produce a sufficient return on investment, and will be able to cover the market with the marketing resources you can invest.”

“Whatever criteria a business uses, the way a company defines the market for its business could mean the difference between profit and loss. While there are often greater costs to service larger markets, there can also be larger returns and economies of scale. The more a business thinks about how it will define its marketplace, the better it will be able to succeed and scale the business as it grows. Hopefully, you will get it right, and if you don’t, all is not lost. A good marketing information system can help you to fine tune your market definition so you can get back on the right track — as P&G did with Febreze.”

To read more of Kalb’s article, click the image.

 

Photo credit: Flickr/Geoff Gallice

 

Which Hats Do YOU Wear?

7 Oct

Pardot, a B2B marketing automation provider and part of salesforce.com, has developed an interactive, provocative Web site on jobs that people have/do:

How many hats do you wear? Marketing automation has many features and capabilities that can simplify the lives of marketers. But if you’re an army of one, wearing a million hats and running your company’s marketing department with limited manpower and resources, the prospect of learning and maintaining a marketing automation system may not sound simple at all — in fact, it may sound impossible. But consider this: Pardot’s own marketing team started as a one-woman powerhouse, backed by nothing more than our own marketing automation product. Let’s take a look at a few of the ways that marketers with limited time and resources can use marketing automation to accomplish the work of a much larger marketing department — and hopefully start shedding their multiple ‘hats’ one by one.”

Click the image to check out the hats many people wear at work. Where do YOU stand? :-)
 

 

Good Versus Bad B2B Clients: An Infographic

29 Sep

Whether B2C or B2B in nature, there are both “good” and  “bad” customers. Good customers have reasonable expectations and do not seek to take advantage of their sellers (and vice versa!). Bad customers can make unreasonable demands and try to squeeze sellers so they don’t make a profit.

Geek Powered Studios, a Web design and SEO firm, offers some very insightful observations on this topic with regard to the B2B arena:

“Even though every client is different, the best-case scenario for any business partnership is one that’s beneficial for both you and the client. You get to do what you do best, so they can gain more business doing what they do best. At the end of the day, you both want their company to be successful. But that can be tough to achieve if you’re always working against each other.”

“As you take on more business, you’ll learn the needs and preferences of each client and their industry. You’re also going to meet a wide variety of client personalities – from the ones who don’t check in for weeks to the ones who micromanage your every click. There will be clients who listen to your suggestions and provide feedback, but there will be others who are never satisfied and expect to be #1 overnight. Some clients may even threaten to drop their contract and just do it themselves, but they should keep in mind that only 11% of businesses who do their own SEO in-house are satisfied with the results.”

Here’s an infographic on good versus bad B2B customers from Geek Powered Studios.
 

 

Snapchat Hits Three: Here’s an Infographic Timeline

28 Sep

It has certainly been an interesting ride for Snapchat since its September 2011 founding: “Enjoy fast and fun mobile conversation! Snap a photo or a video, add a caption, and send it to a friend. They’ll view it, laugh, and then the Snap disappears.”

Here is a detailed infographic timeline of Snapchat by DPFOC Online Marketing.
 

 

Where Luxury Is Headed Worldwide

24 Sep

According to consulting firm McKinsey:

Between now and 2025, the world’s top 600 cities (measured by absolute GDP) are expected to drive nearly two-thirds of global economic growth. Massive urbanization will continue across emerging markets, which will envelope three-quarters of these large cities. It is projected that by 2025, there will be 60 megacities — more than double the current number of urban behemoths — where GDP will exceed $250 billion, accounting for a full one-quarter of global GDP.”

As of 2025, “out of the 25 largest growth-contributing cities, 21 will be located in emerging markets, with a significant number of them in China. This represents a great leap from today’s status quo, in which only 4 of the 25 wealthiest cities are found in the developing world. Yet economic growth does not automatically mean consumption development — or luxury-market growth. Market growth in these cities is indeed conditioned by specific factors that differ from city to city. Variables such as birth rate, wealth distribution, and share of working women correspondingly affect growth in categories such as baby food, beauty products, luxury goods, and women’s fashion. To prioritize their efforts, companies will need to identify the biggest and fastest-growing cities with regard to their particular products and services.”

In McKinsey’s report The Glittering Power of Cities for Luxury Growth, Aimee Kim, Nathalie Remy, and Jennifer Schmidt describe “a road map of where luxury-goods companies should compete in the next decade.”

Here are two charts from that report.

 

 

 

Women Entrepreneurs Still Facing More Hurdles Than Male Entrepreneurs

18 Sep

As we have noted before, there are a number of resources available to help women entrepreneurs level the playing with their male counterparts.

Nonetheless, as Mathilde Collin — co-founder and CEO of Frontapp, a collaborative E-mail app — observes for the Wall Street Journal:

“There’s a huge gender imbalance in the entrepreneurship world. For all the strides women have made in launching startups and driving the economy forward, they face persistent obstacles that hamper their progress — as documented in a recent Senate committee report that shows how far women lag behind men in areas like access to capital.”

The following two charts, both from the Wall Street Journal, highlight (1) the characteristics of female versus male entrepreneurs and (2) the disadvantages that women entrepreneurs face.

Click here to read more about this subject.
 

 

 

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