Tag Archives: bad behavior

Resume Mistakes to Avoid

26 Aug

You’ve spent a lot of time on your resume, right? And you’re really proud of it, right?

Then, you surely want to avoid these six careless errors cited by career coach Don Goodman for Careerealism:

  1. “You forget to update your contact information.”
  2. “You don’t provide enough details on your last job.”
  3. “You don’t update your skills or remove old certifications.”
  4. “You use abbreviations and acronyms only you may know.”
  5. “You keep adding to your resume, but you don’t remove irrelevant jobs.”
  6. “You name you resume file that you send out inappropriately.”

 
Click the image to read more about these mistakes.


 

Must Reading: How Vulnerable are YOU to Being Tracked by Hackers?

31 Jul

Earlier this week, we posted aboutWhat Happens to Our Privacy If a Company Is Sold?” The answer was pretty disconcerting!!

In this post, we are furthering the discussion by publicizing a very recent article How Many Times Has Your Personal Information Been Exposed to Hackers?This article includes a a brief vulnerability quiz and many useful observations:

“Half of American adults had their personal information exposed to hackers last year alone. In a recent attack at the federal Office of Personnel Management, hackers stole the most sensitive personal data for 21.5 million people.”

“Answer the questions below to learn which parts of your identity may have been stolen in some of the major hacking attacks over the last two years and what you can do about it. Not all attacks are included here, and many attacks go undetected, so think of your results as a minimum level of exposure.”

Click the image below to take the quiz and to learn more about this important subject.

What Happens to Our Privacy If a Company Is Sold?

28 Jul

Most of us are not fully aware of the privacy policies and rules that go into effect if a company sold is sold or goes into bankruptcy. Suppose we signed up for a Web site that had specific restrictions on how our personal information could be used, such as not providing it to a third party. Do these restrictions remain if the company is bought by another firm?

Not surprisingly, our privacy rights are not as strong as they should be in these situations. Therefore, we need to give out personal information very carefully — and monitor its use.

As Natasha Singer and Jeremy B. Merrill recently reported for the New York Times:

“The privacy policy for Hulu, a video-streaming service with about nine million subscribers, opens with a declaration that the company ‘respects your privacy.’ That respect could lapse, however, if the company is ever sold or goes bankrupt. At that point, according to a clause several screens deep in the policy, the host of details that Hulu can gather about subscribers — names, birth dates, email addresses, videos watched, device locations, and more — could be transferred to ‘one or more third parties as part of the transaction.’ The policy does not promise to contact users if their data changes hands.”

“Provisions like that act as a sort of data fire sale clause. They are becoming standard among the most popular sites, according to a recent analysis by the New York Times of the top 100 Web sites in the United States as ranked by Alexa, an Internet analytics firm. Of the 99 sites with English-language terms of service or privacy policies, 85 said they might transfer users’ information if a merger, acquisition, bankruptcy, asset sale, or other transaction occurred, the Times’ analysis found.  The sites with these provisions include prominent consumer technology companies like Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google and LinkedIn, in addition to Hulu.”

 
Click the image to read more from the NY Times.
 

 

Marketing Interfaces with IT Need to Get Better

10 Jul

Recently, we wrote about “Marketing and Sales: Better Cooperation Needed.” But, the same may also be said about about marketing and IT (information technology).
 
As reported by eMarketer:

“With technology now an integral part of marketing, it’s critical for marketing and IT teams to be on the same page. However, April 2015 research by Harvey Nash in association with KPMG found that IT’s relationship with marketing was the weakest among departments.”

 

“Marketing and IT departments will need to turn around their poor relationships, as further results highlighted an increase in collaboration. When asked which department owned the digital or E-commerce strategy at their company, nearly half of tech execs said it was shared by IT and marketing — the No. 1 response and up from 40% last year, when the percentage saying this had actually fallen. Among those who weren’t sharing the responsibility, marketers had lost a great share to IT and ‘other’ departments.”

 

Click the chart to read more from eMarketer.

 

 

The Most Trustworthy Sources for Women Shoppers

7 Jul

In today’s multimedia, digital advertising/promotion environment, consumers do not view all sources as equally trustworthy (or very trustworthy). For this post, let’s consider the trustworthiness of media by women consumers.

According to recent research by SheSpeaks, as reported by eMarketer:

“Online product reviews written by regular people — whether they know them personally or not—are what’s most likely to get women to hit the ‘buy’ button, according to SheSpeaks. Asked about the most credible source for information about products, U.S. female Internet users overwhelmingly said ‘only product reviews.’ While 43% preferred reviews by people they followed on social media, or people who were ‘like’ them, a solid 38% trusted any products reviews on shopping sites. Reviews by experts, by contrast, did not impress. Only 7% trusted online product reviews by journalists or analysts the most. Sources of information other than reviews were even less likely to be rated most trustworthy.”

 
Click the image to read more.


 

Marketing and Sales: Better Cooperation Needed

29 Jun

Even though, a company’s sales personnel are typically viewed as part of the marketing function, there are also differences of opinion and sometimes conflicts between marketing and sales. Instead, mutual respect and cooperation need to rule the day!

As Hadar Duek observes for HubSpot:

“In my job, I chat with marketers very often about what problems they’re facing. One of the most common issues I hear about is lead flow — a marketing department generates hundreds of leads per month, but many of them aren’t closing. Nobody knows where to turn. Sales points fingers at marketing. Marketing points fingers at sales. They both shrug, unsure of how to proceed. To get the partnership running effectively again, there are three things I recommend marketers start doing with their sales team.”

1) “Provide sales training on how inbound leads are different. Many sales reps are trained to aggressively go after leads who will close ASAP — and ignore the ones who won’t. When I was in sales, I did the same thing. If a prospect wasn’t ready to send in a purchase order in the next week, I was onto the next lead. With limited time and an endless universe of opportunities, I had to prioritize. This mentality needs to shift when your company is generating inbound leads. Just because someone became a lead by downloading an E-book doesn’t mean they are ready to buy something immediately. On the other hand, they may very well be a great fit for your company down the line.”

2) “Develop a feedback loop between marketing and sales. How often have you seen leads go sales, receive follow-up, and then fall into a black hole? In my work with HubSpot customers, I see it all the time. This is a huge missed opportunity. To prevent this lack of communication, set up a way for sales to pass leads back into the nurturing funnel based on what they learned in the initial qualifying conversation. They like pink? Put them into the all-pink text E-mail nurturing campaign. They like chocolate sandwiches? Put them into the E-mail nurturing campaigns with lots of chocolate sandwiches.”

3) Set up regular meetings between marketing and sales. Some marketers pass all leads directly to their sales team and others only pass over the ones that meet criteria they determine as ‘sales qualified.’ For the latter group, if sales is passing back a lot of leads, this indicates the criteria for transitioning a lead needs to be tweaked. Look at examples of leads that were passed back and what about their criteria missed the mark. Set up a meeting to review these examples.”

Click the image to read Duek’s full article.

 

 

Consumers Down on Data Mining

28 Jun

As we have reported many times (see, for example, 1, 2, 3, 4), privacy and identity theft are important issues for all of us. With that in mind, a critical question for data miners is: How do consumers feel about data-mining practices being deployed by companies and other organizations?

Consider these observations from Natasha Singer, writing for the New York Times:

“Should consumers be able to control how companies collect and use their personal data? At a dinner honoring privacy advocates this week in Washington, Timothy D. Cook, the chief executive of Apple, gave a speech in which he endorsed this simple idea. Yet his argument leveled a direct challenge to the premise behind much of the Internet industry — the proposition that people blithely cede their digital bread crumbs to companies in exchange for free or reduced-priced services subsidized by advertising. You might like these so-called free services,’ Mr. Cook said during the event held by EPIC, a nonprofit research center. “But we don’t think they’re worth having your email or your search history or now even your family photos data-mined and sold off for God knows what advertising purpose.”

Now a study from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania has come to a similar conclusion: Many Americans do not think the trade-off of their data for personalized services, giveaways or discounts is a fair deal either. The findings are likely to fuel the debate among tech executives and federal regulators over whether companies should give consumers more control over the information collected about them.”

 
Click the NY Times infographic to read more of Singer’s article.
 

 

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