Tag Archives: analytics

Tumblr Acquisition Seems to be Working for Yahoo — If It Could Only Sell Ads

30 Aug

Yahoo and CEO Marissa Mayer, who joined Yahoo from Google in July 2012, have had a difficult time making the firm more dynamic in today’s marketplace. However, 2013 acquisition Tumblr may be turning out to be wise strategic move. But its impact on Yahoo’s ad revenues is still in question.

What is Tumblr? According to its Web site: “Tumblr lets you effortlessly share anything. Post text, photos, quotes, links, music, and videos from your browser, phone, desktop, email or wherever you happen to be. You can customize everything, from colors to your theme’s HTML.” As of now, there have been 833 billion posts across 200 million blogs at Tumblr.

New research from eMarketer sheds light on how rapidly Tumblr is growing and is expected to grow:

“Tumblr continues to gain popularity in the U.S., with the number of users increasing 46.2% in 2013, totaling 13.7 million internet users, according to new figures from eMarketer – our first-ever forecast of Tumblr usage. Usage of the Yahoo-owned social blogging platform will increase by nearly another 25% in 2014, according to our estimates, totaling more than 17.1 million internet users this year. Growth in the number of users who access their Tumblr accounts each month will taper off into the single digits by 2017, when the user base totals 22.8 million users, or 12.0% of all social networkers in the U.S.”

Nonetheless, “questions have hovered around the site’s value to the internet giant, and whether its youthful user base can inject life into Yahoo’s declining display advertising business.”

 Click on the image to read more.
 

 

Visualizing Big Data — A Microsoft Video

25 Aug

Microsoft has developed an interesting video overview that demonstrates the extent and value of big data.

Click the image to access the video.
 

 

The Use of Speech Analytics

23 Aug

1to1 Media has just published a new infographic about the use of technology in analyzing speech in business settings. Check it out.
 

 

Ad Age’s 2014 Hispanic Fact Pack

22 Aug

There are more than 55 million Hispanics in the United States, representing about 17 percent of the total U.S. population. As such, Hispanics represent an important — and growing — market segment for marketers.

One good resource for understanding and marketing to Hispanics is the FREE Advertising Age Hispanic Fact Pack 2014. Click the contents to access the full report.
 
Hispanic Fact Pack
 

A New Focus for P&G

19 Aug

Procter & Gamble, the long-time world leader in consumer products and the leading global advertiser, is ready to embark on another new strategy. It has tried many tactics in recent years to try to stimulate company growth and profits.

P&G’s latest approach may seem counter-intuitive — to grow by shrinking its brand portfolio. However, this idea does seem on target and reflects the essence of the Pareto 80/20 Principle that relatively few products account for a disproportionate amount of sales and profits.

As reported by Rachel Abrams for the New York Times:

“After years of expansion into areas like pet food and beauty products, Procter & Gamble announced that it would cut as many as 100 brands from its arsenal to focus on others, like Tide, that made the company a powerhouse over the decades. The move is part of a strategy to improve the company’s financial performance by doubling down on about 80 brands that generate 95 percent of the profits and 90 percent of sales, according to A. G. Lafley, the firm’s chief executive. The company, and the industry at large, have faced pressure as consumers continue to spend less than they did before the financial crisis.”

[According to Lafley,] “‘This new streamlined P&G should continue to grow faster and more sustainably, and reliably create more value. Importantly, this will be a much simpler, much less complex company of leading brands that’s easier to manage and operate.'”

Click the image to read more of Abrams’ story.

 

Photo by Mario Anzuoni/Reuters

 

What Binge Viewers Want

14 Aug

In recent years, due to the widespread availability of DVRs and on-demand programs, more people have been engaging in “binge” viewing — whereby they watch multiple episodes of a program (typically, a series) at one time.

Marketers need to understand this new segment of binge viewer and respond to the desires of this segment.

Consider these observations from eMarketer:

“Ever sat down to watch an episode of a TV show and gotten sucked in for hours on end? That’s called binge-viewing, and a May 2014 study by Annalect — which defined binge-viewing as watching three or more episodes of the same television show in one setting — found that 63% of U.S. TV watchers ages 18 and older fell into this category (though just 30% actually said so).”

“Those who did binge-view voiced a strong aversion to advertisements during their TV time, with 58% saying they liked binge-viewing because they didn’t have to watch ads. A close 57% said ads prevented them from fully enjoying their TV shows, and 53% didn’t think that commercials even had a place in the binge-viewing world.”

 

Click the chart to read more.

 

 

The Changing Constants of Marketing (No, This Is Not an Oxymoron)

18 Jul

We’ve written a lot about the rapidly changing world of marketing — with the advances in social media, technology, big data, etc. So, sometimes, we need to pause and reflect on things that are the constants in marketing.

In 1966, McKinsey published an article by John D. Louth on “The Changing Face of Marketing”: “This article from the McKinsey Quarterly archive analyzes six major changes that promised to transform future marketing efforts. These forces have largely proved to be as influential as predicted and continue to shape today’s challenges.”

The six major changes — which are really marketing constants — are as relevant today as they were nearly 50 years ago:

  1. The dominance of the customer — “It is nearly a truism that the needs and wants of the consumer are the critical issues today in creating new products and services, and developing the accompanying plans to merchandise them at a profit.”
  2. The spread of marketing research — “The second trend is the increased use of marketing research — in terms of both quantity and scope. To an important degree, of course, this trend is a response to the first. If knowledge about future customers is essential, and if the quality of the marketing output is materially affected by the caliber of the informational input, then marketing research is bound to increase in use and contribution as the interest in more scientific marketing grows.”
  3. The rise of the computer — “The third major trend marketing must consider is the emergence of electronic data-processing equipment as a major tool of scientific marketing not only for reporting data but also, more importantly, for planning and control by management.”
  4. Expanded use of test marketing — “A fourth important trend, in my opinion, will be toward more controlled experimentation to narrow the odds of an error in making marketing changes. Two major influences emphasize the need for further expansion of test marketing. The first is the rising cost of marketing changes: the costs, for example, of introducing new products and packaging, of developing new advertising and promotional programs, and of retraining salespeople. The second influence is the mounting investment in product research and development. About half of all corporate research-and-development activity in the United States today is concerned with the creation of new commercial products.”
  5. Metamorphosis of field selling — “The fifth trend I foresee is a shift in the nature of the field-selling job toward a more integrated, profit-oriented marketing effort. Key-account selling is becoming an increasingly crucial feature of the field-sales job—a trend with important implications. In many companies, a key-account selling program may entail special analysis of present and potential customers, and the establishment of related control reports to measure profit results with particular accounts.”
  6. Global market planning — “An ever-broadening application of the marketing concept to worldwide markets is the last of the six broad trends that I believe will change the face of marketing in the next few years. Over the past decade, the marketing concept has become widely accepted in the United States—perhaps, in some situations, too enthusiastically accepted and too indiscriminately applied. Nevertheless, I believe the concept of a completely integrated marketing effort is valid and will be increasingly adopted. In many companies operating worldwide, it will stimulate the development of global market planning.”

Click the image to read the full classic article.
 

 

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