Tag Archives: analytics

What Motivates Car Buyers Around the World?

18 Apr

There are many different reasons why consumers buy specific car types and models — even in the United States. But, how different are purchase motivations around the world?

To answer this question, Nielsen recently conducted a large-scale online survey in 60 countries:

“’Linking global automotive demand with consumer sentiments and media habits is vital to developing marketing strategies that connect the right consumers with the right automotive brands,’ said Pat Gardiner, president of Nielsen Automotive. ‘The Asia-Pacific and Latin American regions, as expected, represent large areas of growth opportunity for the industry, but capturing this opportunity hinges on marketers successfully identifying, understanding’ and effectively connecting with the needs and desires of these buyers.’”

“One key to unlocking the demand drivers is discerning what role a car plays in the consumer’s life. Is it for utility — simply a mode of transportation to get you from one place to another? Is it to express status — a symbol of the success you’ve achieved in life? Or is it more purely emotional — you just love to drive? While each of these sentiments may play a role in the car-buying decision process, connecting with the emotions that pull at the heartstrings draws consumers more powerfully along the path to purchase.”

Click the image to read more.

 


 

The Importance of Customer Service in Marketing to Small Firms

1 Apr

Just like their larger counterparts, small business owners expect their channel partners (especially the manufacturers and suppliers with which they interact) to provide superior customer service. They do not want to be neglected or overlooked.

According to a February 2014 study by Cargo and Toluna (as reported by eMarketer): “Nearly half (47.3%) of small business owners (SBOs) said that poor customer service was the most common mistake brands made. Marketers must make an effort to relate to SBOs: Talking at SBOs (instead of with them), as well as failing to understand their businesses, were also big no-nos, cited by 44.7% and 40.7%, respectively.”

Click the chart to learn more.

 

results from a February 2014 study by Cargo and Toluna suggest that marketers should pay attention to their customer service if they’re looking to benefit from such growth.

Nearly half (47.3%) of SBOs said that poor customer service was the most common mistake brands made. Marketers must also make an effort to relate to SBOs: Talking at SBOs (instead of with them), as well as failing to understand their businesses, were also big no-nos, cited by 44.7% and 40.7%, respectively.
Read more at http://www.emarketer.com/Article/Small-Business-Owners-Wonrsquot-Put-Up-with-Poor-Customer-Service/1010723#CmyPSFEfXZZFMPuo.99

results from a February 2014 study by Cargo and Toluna suggest that marketers should pay attention to their customer service if they’re looking to benefit from such growth.

Nearly half (47.3%) of SBOs said that poor customer service was the most common mistake brands made. Marketers must also make an effort to relate to SBOs: Talking at SBOs (instead of with them), as well as failing to understand their businesses, were also big no-nos, cited by 44.7% and 40.7%, respectively.
Read more at http://www.emarketer.com/Article/Small-Business-Owners-Wonrsquot-Put-Up-with-Poor-Customer-Service/1010723#CmyPSFEfXZZFMPuo.99

 

 

Who Dominates Four Key Industries Globally?

27 Mar

For a number of industries (such as banking, media, food and beverage, and oil), a few large companies dominate globally. Here is an interesting infographic from www.internationalbusinessguide.org.

Click the infographic to access data on the firms cited in the chart.

 

 Source: InternationalBusinessGuide.org

 

Lessons from SXSW Interactive

20 Mar

As noted at its Web site: “The South by Southwest® (SXSW®) Conferences & Festivals offer the unique convergence of original music, independent films, and emerging technologies. Fostering creative and professional growth alike, SXSW is the premier destination for discovery.”

At the recent SXSW Interactive event,  JWT Intelligence did some background research and came up with 10 key overriding themes for us to consider:

  1. The Snowden effect
  2. Data permanence
  3. Demystifying cryptocurrency
  4. The future of the Internet
  5. Wearables
  6. Man versus machine
  7. Disruption
  8. The humanitarian potential of technology
  9. Visualization
  10. Mindfulness and technology

Here is a slideshow that looks in-depth at these overriding themes from JWT Intelligence:
 

 

Analytics and Social Media Marketing

4 Mar

With the growth of social media marketing has come the related increase in the use of analytics to measure the effectiveness of social media. As we have reported before, Google Analytics has been the leading tool for marketers in studying their social media performance.

Now, new research from Demand Metric (sponsored by NetBase) highlights how companies are using social media analytics. According to eMarketer,

“The rise in social media analytics tools has satisfied marketer demand for a way to measure and gather insights from social marketing efforts. Nearly two-thirds of organizations in North America have adopted them, according to a January 2014 study by Demand Metric sponsored by NetBase. And this group responded quickly to the release of such tools — over half of takeup had occurred in the previous two years. How are marketing professionals using social media analytics tools for optimization? The top response among those polled by Demand Metric was campaign tracking (60%). This was followed by brand analysis (48%) and competitive intelligence (40%).”

 

 

An Interview with Futurist Guru Ray Kurzweil

3 Mar

Ray Kurzweil is widely acknowledged as a true technology guru. As Wikipedia notes: “Kurzweil was the principal inventor of the first CCD flatbed scanner, the first omni-font optical character recognition, the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind, the first commercial text-to-speech synthesizer, the first music synthesizer Kurzweil K250 capable of recreating the grand piano and other orchestral instruments, and the first commercially marketed large-vocabulary speech recognition.”

Recently, the Wall Street Journal‘s Editor-in-Chief Gerard Baker sat down with Kurzweil for an in-depth interview: “Machines will soon be as smart as we are, says Ray Kurzweil. But not to worry. The engineering director of Google Inc. and founder and CEO of Kurzweil Technologies Inc. argues that as computers get smaller and more powerful, we won’t face a sci-fi nightmare. Instead, these machines will help us expand our capabilities.”

For print excerpts from the interview, click here.

Click the image for a video clip of the interview.

 

Is Facebook’s Acquisition Strategy the Right Approach?

20 Feb

In recent years, Facebook has been in an aggressive acquisition mode. The most famous acquisition — until today — was Instagram in 2012 for $1 billion.

Now, Facebook has announced a bid for messaging company WhatsApp for $19 billion. Does this bid make sense. Take a look at this Wall Street Journal chart.

Source: Rani Molla/Wall Street Journal

 

Consider these observations, as reported by Reed Albergotti, Doug MacMillan, and George Stahl for the Wall Street Journal:

“‘While monetization will take time, we think the potential size of the user base and strong engagement on WhatsApp should ultimately lead to meaningful monetization,’ Sterne Agee analyst Arvind Bhatia said, adding that 70% of WhatsApp’s users use it daily, above Facebook’s 62%. ‘We note that WhatsApp’s user base is nearly 2x Twitter and growing at a significantly faster pace,’ the analyst said.”

“WhatsApp has long been seen as a takeover target for Internet giants. Google had reached out to buy the company several years ago, two people familiar with the situation said, while two other people said deal talks between the two companies also took place recently. A Google spokesman declined to comment. While Facebook’s shares fell Thursday, the decline would have been worse if Google had purchased WhatsApp.”

 Click on the image for a WSJ video.


 

Should Marketers Be Climbing the Vine?

18 Feb

Is Vine.co (owned by Twitter) ready to be the next “big thing” in social media? Already, it has generated some changes by competitor Instagram. When it was launched in late January 2013, Vine announced that it “We wanted to make it easier for people to create and share videos from a device we almost always have with us: our phone. Since then, you’ve shown time and again that video can bring us together in new and profound ways. You inspire us every day. Thank you for making our first year so special.”

As a more independent expert, Douglas Karr, reports for MarketingTechBlog: “Vine launched a year ago and has had quite a bit of success. Think of Vine as a video version of Twitter, where you record short clips of video and upload them. It’s not surprising that Twitter purchased Vine and integrated playing the videos from Twitter and their applications. When using the app, the camera records only while the screen is being touched, allowing you to do some nifty videos.”

Check out this infographic to see how well Vine is doing — and why marketers should take note!!
 


 

Being Prepared for 2014 and Beyond

13 Feb

Businessweek annually forecasts the year ahead. For this year, it says that: “Inflation and interest rates are low, oil prices are expected to fall, companies are sitting on cash, and there’s plenty of consumer demand.” In the 2014 report, Peter Coy sets the economic and geopolitical stage for 55 global industries.”

Click the image for a fun (and hard) quiz to test how ready you are for the future. 
 

 

Upgradia: Another Term for the Marketing Vocabulary

5 Feb

In recent years, we’ve learned about friending, showrooming, tweeting, pinning, blogging, twerking (oops, how did that show up here? :-) ), and a whole lot more.

Today, we can add “upgradia” to our lexicon. It’s really a concept that’s been around for a while, but only now can a term for this practice be added added to our marketing vocabulary. And it is a key emerging concept for marketers and product managers.

According to Trendwatching.com:

“The old model of physical consumption – purchase, use, declare obsolete, discard – is being overturned by a new model: one founded on constant improvement, upgrade, and iteration.”

“UPGRADIA: Driven by consumers’ thirst for quicker, more seamless access to the new (in ways that are cheaper, more sustainable, and more participatory) and facilitated by emerging technologies, the constant stream of upgrades and iterations typical of the digital ecosystem is coming to the world of physical objects.”

What is driving upgradia? Trendwatching.com has identified several factors, including these:

  • Infinite Newism — “The digital-inspired expectation of perpetual, instant upgrades meets new physical world technologies”
  • Relentless Product Evolution
  • More for Less — “Upgrades satisfy consumers’ deepest desires: less money, less guilt”
  • Hacker Chic — “The status and excitement of DIY [do-it-yourself] upgrades”
  • Every Object Connected — “Turning ‘dumb’ objects – think TVs, cars, and more – smart is the key upgradia innovation.”

Click the image to learn more from Trendwatching.com.
 


 

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