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The Stages of Social Media Engagement

23 Jul

At this point in time, millions of organizations (and individuals) have become engaged in social media. However, they are not all at the same stage of development. Some are much further advanced than others.

As reported by Simply Measured:

“Nearly every technology applied to business processes, from change management software to cyber security, now boasts a maturity model. They’re intended to point out how far a company has gone towards optimizing the use of the technology. Social media is no exception.”

“Among the sources of information on social media maturity today, one stands out. It’s business research and consulting firm Altimeter Group’s paper, The Evolution of Social Business: Six Stages of Social Business Transformation. The six stages – planning, presence, engagement, formalized, strategic, and converged – describe how companies go from dabbling part-time in social to considering social in every strategic business decision they make in every department. When a company reaches this final, most evolved stage, Altimeter calls it a ‘social business.’”

In what stage of social media development do YOU fall? What are YOU doing to move further along in your development?

 

 

 

Free Resources from Trendwatching.com

17 Jul

Trendwatching.com is an excellent source of information about current and emerging trends around the globe:

“Established in 2002, we help forward-thinking business professionals in 180+ countries understand the new consumer and subsequently uncover compelling, profitable innovation opportunities. We rely on professionals in London, New York, São Paulo, Singapore and Lagos and on our network of spotters in more than 90+ countries worldwide.”

At its Web site, Trendwatching.com makes available a number of free resources. Here are some recent examples:

 

 

Marketing Interfaces with IT Need to Get Better

10 Jul

Recently, we wrote about “Marketing and Sales: Better Cooperation Needed.” But, the same may also be said about about marketing and IT (information technology).
 
As reported by eMarketer:

“With technology now an integral part of marketing, it’s critical for marketing and IT teams to be on the same page. However, April 2015 research by Harvey Nash in association with KPMG found that IT’s relationship with marketing was the weakest among departments.”

 

“Marketing and IT departments will need to turn around their poor relationships, as further results highlighted an increase in collaboration. When asked which department owned the digital or E-commerce strategy at their company, nearly half of tech execs said it was shared by IT and marketing — the No. 1 response and up from 40% last year, when the percentage saying this had actually fallen. Among those who weren’t sharing the responsibility, marketers had lost a great share to IT and ‘other’ departments.”

 

Click the chart to read more from eMarketer.

 

 

Evans on Marketing’s Most Popular Posts for the First Half of 2015

3 Jul

Thank you for reading our evansonmarketing.com posts. :-)

Here are the most popular 12 posts thus far in 2015 (January 1-June 30). Take a look if you missed any of them:

  1. See How Well You Can Do on This Entertaining Marketing Quiz (Because this quiz is no longer available, here is another interesting one for you: 5 Things You Thought You Knew About Interactive Content)
  2. What Job Skills Will Be Most Important in 2020?
  3. Body Language Errors to Avoid During Interviews
  4. What Are the Toughest Languages to Translate?
  5. Looking to Generate Passion? Consider Using the Color Red
  6. Social Marketing Tips
  7. Do YOU Think Before You Tweet?
  8. Personalizing Marketing
  9. Ten Marketing-Oriented Business Trends to Consider: A Slideshow
  10. Does Rebranding Always Work?
  11. Video and Social Media Are Big in the Mobile Era
  12. Pay More Attention to Loyal Customers!

 

 

Consumers Down on Data Mining

28 Jun

As we have reported many times (see, for example, 1, 2, 3, 4), privacy and identity theft are important issues for all of us. With that in mind, a critical question for data miners is: How do consumers feel about data-mining practices being deployed by companies and other organizations?

Consider these observations from Natasha Singer, writing for the New York Times:

“Should consumers be able to control how companies collect and use their personal data? At a dinner honoring privacy advocates this week in Washington, Timothy D. Cook, the chief executive of Apple, gave a speech in which he endorsed this simple idea. Yet his argument leveled a direct challenge to the premise behind much of the Internet industry — the proposition that people blithely cede their digital bread crumbs to companies in exchange for free or reduced-priced services subsidized by advertising. You might like these so-called free services,’ Mr. Cook said during the event held by EPIC, a nonprofit research center. “But we don’t think they’re worth having your email or your search history or now even your family photos data-mined and sold off for God knows what advertising purpose.”

Now a study from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania has come to a similar conclusion: Many Americans do not think the trade-off of their data for personalized services, giveaways or discounts is a fair deal either. The findings are likely to fuel the debate among tech executives and federal regulators over whether companies should give consumers more control over the information collected about them.”

 
Click the NY Times infographic to read more of Singer’s article.
 

 

A Provocative Take on the Future of Self-Driving Cars

26 Jun

Self-driving cars are in the late stages of testing in the United States. Besides safety issues, consumer skepticism, the regulatory environment will have a major impact on how quickly and widely that self-driving cars make it in the market.

Given that self-driving cars will/may be sold in the very near future, we need to better understand where the marketplace will be headed. Recently, McKinsey’s Michele Bertoncello and Dominik Weewe published a thought-provoking view of self-driving cars: “Ten Ways Autonomous Driving Could Redefine the Automotive World — The Development of Self-Driving, or Autonomous, Vehicles Is Accelerating. Here’s How They Could Affect Consumers and Companies.”

  1. “Industrial fleets lead the way.”
  2.  “Car OEMs [original equipment manufacturers face a decision. Automakers worldwide will likely define and communicate their strategic position on AVs in the next two to three years.”
  3.  “New mobility models emerge. While OEMs are developing autonomous vehicles, a variety of other transport-mobility innovations are already hitting the road.”
  4.  “The car-service landscape changes.”
  5.  “Car insurers might shift their business model. Car insurers have always provided consumer coverage in the event of accidents caused by human error. With driverless vehicles, auto insurers might shift the core of their business model, focusing mainly on insuring car manufacturers from liabilities from technical failure of their AVs, as opposed to protecting private customers from risks associated with human error in accidents.”
  6.  “Companies could reshape their supply chains.”
  7.  “Drivers have more time for everything. AVs could free as much as 50 minutes a day for users, who will be able to spend traveling time working, relaxing, or accessing entertainment.”
  8.  “Parking becomes easier. AVs could change the mobility behavior of consumers, potentially reducing the need for parking space in the United States by more than 5.7 billion square meters.”
  9.  “Accident rates drop. By mid-century, the penetration of AVs and other ADAS could ultimately cause vehicle crashes in the United States to fall from second to ninth place in terms of their lethality ranking among accident types.”
  10.  “AVs accelerate robotics development for consumer applications.”

 
Click the chart to read the full article.

McK1
 

Doing Better with Google Analytics: An Infographic

15 Jun

Over the years, we have posted several times about the importance and value of Google Analytics for marketers. See, for example, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.

So, you are using Google Analytics as part of your Web site analysis, right? You are doing everything you can to score well on Google Analytics, right?

Here is an infographic from QuickSprout to help you do even better.

 

 

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