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Who Has the World’s Toughest Job?

29 Jul

Looking for a video with a job-hunting chuckle and an emotional ending? Then, this is the post for you.

Hang in there until the reveal in this video from American Greetings! It’s worth it. :-)
 
 

 

Marketing Art at the J. Paul Getty Museum

24 Jul

The J. Paul Getty Museum, located in Los Angeles, Clifornia, is world renowned. Its mission is to: “inspire curiosity about, and enjoyment and understanding of, the visual arts by collecting, conserving, exhibiting, and interpreting works of art of outstanding quality and historical importance.” It “builds collections through purchase and gifts, and develops programs of exhibitions, publications, scholarly research, public education, and the performing arts that engage our diverse local and international audiences.”

The Getty Museum appreciates the importance of marketing. One interesting, marketing-oriented initiative of the Museum is its interactive online discussion of The Life of Art: Context, Collecting, and Display, which is on exhibit at the physical museum:

“Look closely at a work of art and you are likely to uncover clues to a fascinating past and present: an object’s intimate connection to people, places, institutions, and cultures. This exhibition takes four objects from the Museum’s decorative arts collection—a silver fountain, a wall light, a side chair, and a lidded bowl—and encourages you to explore their ‘lives’ through an interactive presentation.”

Click the image to access the interactive online show-and-tell.
 

 

Evans on Marketing’s 20 Most Popular Posts

23 Jun

Since this blog began in 2012, several of the 900 posts have been especially popular among readers. For those who have missed any of the 20 most popular posts, here they are:

  1. Best Business Decisions Ever?
  2. Online Shopping Behavior by Gender and Age
  3. Do You Regularly Check Yourself Out at Google?
  4. A Job Skills Infographic
  5. Is It OK to Leave a Job Off Your Resume?
  6. The Volkswagen Jetta Promotes Safety
  7. Apple and Planned Obsolescence: Is This Good Or Bad?
  8. New Balance Athletic Shoes: Made in the USA — But for How Long?
  9. Great Privacy Tip: How to Go Incognito on Google Chrome
  10. The Value of Infographics
  11. Are You Trying NOT to Get A Job?
  12. Ten Tips to Help You Get a Job Interview
  13. Is Marketing a Good Career Choice?
  14. Where Consumers Will Pay More for Products from Socially-Conscious Companies
  15. 15 Traits of Superior Employees
  16. The Top Social Media Sites in China: An Infographic
  17. Do YOU Provide Too Much Online Information About Yourself?
  18. Is Banning Facebook at Work a Good Or Bad Idea?
  19. Questions NOT to Ask During a Job Interview
  20. Is Sharing One’s Salary Data with Co-Workers OK?

 

TV Everywhere Is Booming

16 Jun

As we have noted before, television viewing behavior is quickly evolving (yes, that’s an oxymoron, :-) ). Now, the “TV Everywhere” phenomenon means that fewer of us our tied to the TV cord.

According to eMarketer:

“Consumers want access to anything, anytime, anywhere — including television. One solution? TV Everywhere — services that enable cable and network customers to watch TV content on any Internet-connected device by authenticating their subscriptions. Based on Q1 2014 data from Adobe Digital Index, such services may be working. The number of unique TV Everywhere visitors in the US rose 157% between Q1 2013 and Q1 2014 and 49% between Q4 2013 and Q1 2014.”

Research by Viacom found that the number one advantage of TV Everywhere for viewers is the flexibility that this technology allows them.

Click the image to read more.

 

 

Consumers want access to anything, anytime, anywhere—including television. One solution? TV Everywhere—services that enable cable and network customers to watch TV content on any internet-connected device by authenticating their subscriptions. Based on Q1 2014 data from Adobe Digital Index, such services may be working. According to the research, the number of unique TV Everywhere visitors in the US rose 157% between Q1 2013 and Q1 2014 and 49% between Q4 2013 and Q1 2014

Research by Viacom found that the number one advantage of TV Everywhere for viewers is the flexibility that this technology allows them.

Click the image to read more.

 

 

Flexibility is the main reason today’s busy, on-the-go consumers are taking advantage of TV Everywhere. – See more at: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/TV-Everywhere-Visitors-Jump-157-Year-over-Year/1010924/1#sthash.mPmHQu27.dpuf
Consumers want access to anything, anytime, anywhere—including television. One solution? TV Everywhere—services that enable cable and network customers to watch TV content on any internet-connected device by authenticating their subscriptions. Based on Q1 2014 data from Adobe Digital Index, such services may be working. – See more at: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/TV-Everywhere-Visitors-Jump-157-Year-over-Year/1010924/1#sthash.mPmHQu27.dpuf
Consumers want access to anything, anytime, anywhere—including television. One solution? TV Everywhere—services that enable cable and network customers to watch TV content on any internet-connected device by authenticating their subscriptions. Based on Q1 2014 data from Adobe Digital Index, such services may be working. – See more at: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/TV-Everywhere-Visitors-Jump-157-Year-over-Year/1010924/1#sthash.lyjGbxQp.dpuf

Consumers want access to anything, anytime, anywhere—including television. One solution? TV Everywhere—services that enable cable and network customers to watch TV content on any internet-connected device by authenticating their subscriptions. Based on Q1 2014 data from Adobe Digital Index, such services may be working.

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According to the research, the number of unique TV Everywhere visitors in the US rose 157% between Q1 2013 and Q1 2014 and 49% between Q4 2013 and Q1 2014

- See more at: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/TV-Everywhere-Visitors-Jump-157-Year-over-Year/1010924/1#sthash.lyjGbxQp.dpuf

Consumers want access to anything, anytime, anywhere—including television. One solution? TV Everywhere—services that enable cable and network customers to watch TV content on any internet-connected device by authenticating their subscriptions. Based on Q1 2014 data from Adobe Digital Index, such services may be working.

SHARE

According to the research, the number of unique TV Everywhere visitors in the US rose 157% between Q1 2013 and Q1 2014 and 49% between Q4 2013 and Q1 2014

- See more at: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/TV-Everywhere-Visitors-Jump-157-Year-over-Year/1010924/1#sthash.lyjGbxQp.dpuf

Consumers want access to anything, anytime, anywhere—including television. One solution? TV Everywhere—services that enable cable and network customers to watch TV content on any internet-connected device by authenticating their subscriptions. Based on Q1 2014 data from Adobe Digital Index, such services may be working.

SHARE

According to the research, the number of unique TV Everywhere visitors in the US rose 157% between Q1 2013 and Q1 2014 and 49% between Q4 2013 and Q1 2014

- See more at: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/TV-Everywhere-Visitors-Jump-157-Year-over-Year/1010924/1#sthash.lyjGbxQp.dpuf

Consumers want access to anything, anytime, anywhere—including television. One solution? TV Everywhere—services that enable cable and network customers to watch TV content on any internet-connected device by authenticating their subscriptions. Based on Q1 2014 data from Adobe Digital Index, such services may be working.

SHARE

According to the research, the number of unique TV Everywhere visitors in the US rose 157% between Q1 2013 and Q1 2014 and 49% between Q4 2013 and Q1 2014

- See more at: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/TV-Everywhere-Visitors-Jump-157-Year-over-Year/1010924/1#sthash.lyjGbxQp.dpuf

Are Sports Sponsorships Worth the Investment?

14 Jun

Yesterday, we looked at the growing U.S. TV audience for soccer and the opportunities this provides to sponsors and advertisers.

Today, let us look at the financial dimensions of sports sponsorships for the 2014 World Cup in Brazil. Although the investments are huge, it is not clear that they are always the best expenditures of marketing dollars.

According to McKinsey’s Jeff Jacobs, Pallav Jain, and Kushan Surana:

The Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) stands to make $1.4 billion from sponsorship deals with 20 major companies during the World Cup in Brazil. That’s 10 percent more sponsorship revenue than from the last World Cup, in South Africa. Although significant, that’s still far below U.S. corporate spending on sports sponsorships, which grew to an estimated $20 billion in 2013 — equal to one-third of total U.S. television advertising and one-half of digital advertising.”

“Considering the huge amounts involved, you would imagine sponsors of athletes and events have clear answers when asked about their return on investment (ROI). You would be wrong. Industry research reveals that about one-third to one-half of U.S. companies don’t have a system in place to measure sponsorship ROI comprehensively. And that’s costly in another way: in our experience, executives who implement a comprehensive approach to gauge the impact of their sponsorships can increase returns by as much as 30 percent.”

Click the image to read more – including ways to assess the performance of sponsorship dollars.
 

 

Is the World Cup Coming of Age for U.S. Viewers?

13 Jun

For decades, soccer has been a leading participation sport in the United States. But TV viewership has lagged behind.

With the 2014 World Cup being in time-zone-friendly Brazil — and ESPN having wall-to-wall coverage of matches, 2014 may be the year for TV viewing to take off in the United States.

As Nielsen notes:

“Long considered an up-and-coming sport to both watch and play, the popularity of soccer has been growing steadily since the rise of the soccer mom. In fact, advertisers and programmers looking for a unique opportunity to connect with fans outside well-established American sports, such as football or basketball, take note: the World Cup could be that space. After all, the sport’s fans are dedicated to the teams they root for, avid spenders, and quite social when it comes to digital dialogue. Soccer’s fans are also a pretty diverse lot, which isn’t surprising considering it’s the preeminent sport throughout much of the world.”

Click the chart to read more.
 

 

Netflix Keeps on Rolling

4 Jun

After a few hiccups (such as the introduction of dual subscriptions), Netflix is certainly on a roll again. And a large part of Netflix’s recent success has been tied to its development of original programming, including Emmy-winning House of Cards. This move has changed the business for the industry and drawn emulators like Amazon.

Here is a good infographic that shows “The Economics of Netflix: How to Make a $100 Million Show.” Click on the image for a larger version, and then scroll down to learn many interesting facts about the economics of programming.
 

Economics of Netflix
Source: GreatBusinessSchools.org

 

Are You Overpaying? How Many TV Channels Do YOU Actually Watch?

13 May

Over the last few years, the debate has been growing more fierce with regard to the way TV channel subscriptions are sold to consumers.

On one side of the debate are the service providers who aggressively bundle channels and charge a monthly fee for the bundle — whether the consumer wants all the channels in the bundle or not. On the side are consumer advocates and some government officials who say that people should only have to pay for the channels that they actually want to view.

Now, comes new research from Nielsen that seems to strongly indicate that unbundling channel fees would greatly benefit most viewers. According to Nielsen, the typical household now receives 189 TV channels through subscription bundles. Yet, the typical household regularly watches only 17-18 of those channels.

Click the image to read more from Nielsen.
 

 

A Clever Take on What Brands Cannot Do for Us

24 Apr

Sorry brand marketers, but your brands cannot solve all of our lives’ problems or issues. :-)

Enjoy this slideshow by Michael Paredrakos, Strategic Planner at the Curious Brain.

 

 

When Does a Selfie Go Too Far?

10 Apr

Recently, the Boston Red Sox baseball team was honored by President Obama for winning the 2013 World Series. The tradition of U.S. presidents honoring winning teams and athletes goes back many decades.

So, what makes this year’s celebration different? David Ortiz of the Red Sox took a selfie with President Obama. Nothing wrong what that, right? So, what’s the controversy?

It seems that Ortiz had signed a promotion deal with Samsung shortly before the ceremony and the photo then became viewed as too commercial in nature — something that all presidents have frowned upon.

As reported by Tim Parry for Multichannel Merchant:

“It all seems innocent. But Terry Lefton of Sports Business Daily reported a day before the Big Papi-presidential selfie that David Ortiz had signed an endorsement deal with Samsung – one similar to the one Ellen DeGeneres signed with Samsung prior to her Oscars selfie.”

“Here’s where it gets funny: Samsung told The Boston Globe that they arranged for the Ortiz-Obama selfie. Ortiz, on the other hand, said the selfie was not a publicity stunt.”

Who do YOU believe?

Click the image to read more.
 

 

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