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Personalize Your Products for Better Customer Relationships

21 Oct

Are you personalizing your products with customers? If no, it’s time!

As Informatica, a data integration firm, notes:

“Personalization is the next big innovation wave in E-commerce. You need to use everything you know about each customer so you can market and sell to them more effectively in every channel. Everyone’s been saying it for a decade — but now it’s really happening.”

In every channel, intelligent personalization out-performs one-size-fits-all commerce. On websites. In E-mail. On mobile apps and sites in call centers. In social media.”

In the slideshow below, Informatica discusses: “Know Your Own Products.” There are many tips.
 

 

Branding and Millennials

17 Oct

As we have written before, millennials represent a very large and distinctive market segment — in the United States and around the world. In setting a brand strategy to best appeal to this group, various factors must be kept in mind.

In a recent study (Debunking the Millennial Myth: Initiative’s Global Research Study), Initiative – a U.K.-based media planning and buying agency — “examined the lives of 10,000 25-34 year olds in 19 countries, finding out about their lives, their mindset, how they use technology, and how they feel about brands.”

CLICK HERE here to download the full report. (Note: A short login form must be completed to access the report.)

A summary of the report has been published by MarketingCharts:

“Three in 10 millennials (aged 25-34) around the world are cynical about the way brands market to them, and that figure rises above 40% in the U.S. and U.K., finds Initiative in a new study. With such skepticism evident, brands should demonstrate their commitment to social causes and emphasize attributes such as authenticity and trustworthiness. [This] can be seen as directly related to the skepticism that many millennials hold for brands. But, they also align with some of millennials’ common traits: Millennials’ economic uncertainty and insecurity, for example, means that they appreciate brands that are useful to them and can emotionally connect with them in an authentic way.”

Click the chart to read more of the summary.

 

 

Advertising Icons and Social Media

13 Oct

Over the years , there have been some very effective advertising icons, such as Ronald McDonald, Mr. Clean, Tony the Tiger, the Gerber Baby, Jared for Subway, the Geiko Gecko, and Progressive’s Flo. [Click here to see one listing of the 25 best ad icons of all time].

Now that we are in the new era of social media, what can we learn from iconic advertising symbols that can be applied in this era?

As Lizetta Staplefoote, a content marketing strategist and copywriter, writes for Visual.ly:

“Since the early days of marketing, advertising icons have been used to infuse personality into a brand and reinforce positioning similar to the way marketing content is used today. In their ability to endure and engage, there are lessons in these iconic advertising characters that you can use to enhance your content marketing strategy. Take a look at the elements of a few easily recognizable, vintage ad figures and see how you can apply their success to your content.

1. Morton’s Salt Girl – Reflect value proposition.

2. National Park Service’s Smokey the Bear – Be personable. 


3. Kellogg’s Tony the Tiger – Constantly evolve.

4. Planter’s Mr. Peanut – Show off your personality. 


5. Cracker Jack’s Sailor Jack – Play to your audience. 


6. Coppertone Girl – Be conscious.

7. Jolly Green Giant – Be different.

8. Quaker Oats’ Larry – Leverage the familiar.

9. RCA’s Nipper – Have a story.

Click the image to read a lot more from Staplefoote on the lessons from the above advertising icons.
 

 

How Branding, Differentiation, Positioning, and Corporate Identity Concepts Differ

12 Oct

We have written before about branding, differentiation, positioning, and corporate identity from several vantage points (see, for example, 1, 2, 3).

Now, here is a good, concise infographic from Insight180, the branding and design firm, that distinguishes among these important concepts:

“Many times, marketing terms get used interchangeably when they actually mean very different things. Learn below the actual meaning of branding, differentiation, positioning and corporate identity and the roles they play in business development and marketing.”

 

 

Snapchat Hits Three: Here’s an Infographic Timeline

28 Sep

It has certainly been an interesting ride for Snapchat since its September 2011 founding: “Enjoy fast and fun mobile conversation! Snap a photo or a video, add a caption, and send it to a friend. They’ll view it, laugh, and then the Snap disappears.”

Here is a detailed infographic timeline of Snapchat by DPFOC Online Marketing.
 

 

Where Luxury Is Headed Worldwide

24 Sep

According to consulting firm McKinsey:

Between now and 2025, the world’s top 600 cities (measured by absolute GDP) are expected to drive nearly two-thirds of global economic growth. Massive urbanization will continue across emerging markets, which will envelope three-quarters of these large cities. It is projected that by 2025, there will be 60 megacities — more than double the current number of urban behemoths — where GDP will exceed $250 billion, accounting for a full one-quarter of global GDP.”

As of 2025, “out of the 25 largest growth-contributing cities, 21 will be located in emerging markets, with a significant number of them in China. This represents a great leap from today’s status quo, in which only 4 of the 25 wealthiest cities are found in the developing world. Yet economic growth does not automatically mean consumption development — or luxury-market growth. Market growth in these cities is indeed conditioned by specific factors that differ from city to city. Variables such as birth rate, wealth distribution, and share of working women correspondingly affect growth in categories such as baby food, beauty products, luxury goods, and women’s fashion. To prioritize their efforts, companies will need to identify the biggest and fastest-growing cities with regard to their particular products and services.”

In McKinsey’s report The Glittering Power of Cities for Luxury Growth, Aimee Kim, Nathalie Remy, and Jennifer Schmidt describe “a road map of where luxury-goods companies should compete in the next decade.”

Here are two charts from that report.

 

 

 

Great Advice from Successful Business Founders

22 Sep

Our most popular post to date — by far — has been The Best Advice Received — and Passed On — by Leaders of Industry.” That post referred to advice by some of our best-known business “luminaries,” who have managed large firms.

However, there is also quite A LOT that we can learn from the entrepreneurs who have introduced and managed successful businesses that started out quite small.

Recently, Entrepreneur‘s Matt Villano interviewed several company founders and titled the article: “The Best Business Advice You’ll Ever Get.” [Notice the similarity in the title of our earlier post. :-) ] As Villano notes:

“Being an entrepreneur doesn’t mean you have to go it alone. Most successful business owners will tell you they could not have accomplished their goals without help — from a mentor, colleague, even mom and dad. For many, their ability to evaluate, internalize, and act on the counsel they received was instrumental in getting their companies off the ground. In an effort to tap some of this wisdom, we called on business gurus to tell us the very best piece of advice they’ve received. From hiring to philanthropy and more, their responses were as varied as the companies they run.”

These are some the executives whom Villano interviewed and who provided advice:

  • Dennis Crowley, CEO, Foursquare
  • Rick Alden, Founder, Skullcandy
  • Petera Relan, Founder, 9+
  • Sheila Johnson, Founder and CEO, Salamander Hotels & Resorts
  • Melinda Emerson, Founder and CEO, Quintessence Group
  • Christine Day, CEO, Luvo
  • Rehan Choudhry, Founder, Life is Beautiful
  • Reece Pacheco, Founder, Shelby.tv
  • Nick Lazaris, President and CEO, Coravin

Click Dennis Crowley’s photo to read Villano’s full interviews.
 

Photo © Ewan Burns

 

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