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2014 Global Patent Filings

21 Mar

According to the WIPO Web site:

“Intellectual property (IP) refers to creations of the mind, such as inventions; literary and artistic works; designs; and symbols, names, and images used in commerce. IP is protected in law by, for example, patents, copyright, and trademarks, which enable people to earn recognition or financial benefit from what they invent or create. By striking the right balance between the interests of innovators and the wider public interest, the IP system aims to foster an environment in which creativity and innovation can flourish.”

“The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) is the global forum for intellectual property policy, services, information and cooperation. A specialized agency of the United Nations, WIPO assists its 188 member states in developing a balanced international IP legal framework to meet society’s evolving needs. It provides business services for obtaining IP rights in multiple countries and resolving disputes. It delivers capacity-building programs to help developing countries benefit from using IP. And it provides free access to unique knowledge banks of IP information.”

Here is an infographic about global patent filings in 2014.
 
infographics_pct_2014
 

How to Generate Better Product Ideas

18 Mar

New, actionable ideas are the long-term lifeblood of both large and small firms. It is rare that a business can survive over time with just the products being marketing today.

Many companies recognize that idea generation and assessment are aided by following a series of steps. Others are totally haphazard in their approach and hope to eventually have a “eureka” moment.

As Laura Montini, reports for Inc.:

When it comes to great ideas, intuition is ‘more powerful than intellect.’ That’s according to the late Steve Jobs. Many experts would agree that truly transformative ideas rarely come from one individual with a high IQ. Instead, these researchers, executives, and entrepreneurs believe that innovation is largely the result of freewheeling collaboration — with just a few guidelines.”

“Below Bluescape, creator of collaboration software and hardware, organized a few of these experts’ insights into four main steps. Take a look a the infographic below for tips on creating an effective idea strategy.”

 

 

Taylor Swift: Marketing Guru

13 Mar

Taylor Swift is not only one of the leading stars in the world. She is also a marketing innovator — as exemplified by her recent decision to abandon Spotify.

Here’s one perspective on Swift as a marketing pioneer from Knowledge@Wharton:

If you’re ready to ‘party like its 1989,’ you’ll have to talk to Taylor Swift first. The pop star recently applied to trademark that phrase and others related to her songs — a move that marks a shift in the industry, as artists, songwriters, and music publishers increasingly become independent brands. But the case also raises questions about where artists and industry players might cross the line and damage their reputations.”

“Swift’s trademark quest could work out fine, or it could backfire, according to R. Polk Wagner, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, whose specialties include copyright and trademark law. ‘She could trademark every line from her lyrics, but there are real limits,’ he said. ‘Every time she does that, she is risking money and risks [her] reputation. Twitter  She has to walk a careful line between being an aggressive brander, promoter and builder of the Taylor Swift brand and crossing that line into aggressively suing her fans and customers.’”

Click the image to read more.
 

 

A New Golden Age for Marketing?

10 Mar

The modern field of marketing has had a nice long run — and steadily evolved along with technology and customer trends. So, has the marketing discipline peaked or are the best times still ahead?

According to McKinsey’s Jonathan Gordon and Jesko Perrey, we are entering “the dawn of marketing’s new golden age. Marketers are boosting their precision, broadening their scope, moving more quickly, and telling better stories.”

To summarize Gordon and Perrey:

“Science has permeated marketing for decades. Fans of the television drama Mad Men saw a fictionalized encounter when an IBM System/360 mainframe computer physically displaced the creative department of a late-1960s advertising agency. In reality, though, the 1960s through the early 1990s witnessed a happy marriage of advertising and technology as marketers mastered both the medium of television and the science of Nielsen ratings. These years gave birth to iconic advertising messages in categories ranging from sparkling beverages (‘I’d like to buy the world a Coke’) to credit cards (‘American Express. Don’t leave home without it’) to air travel (‘British Airways: the world’s favourite airline’).”

“Until recently, marketers could be forgiven for looking back wistfully at this golden age as new forces reshaped their world into something completely different. These new trends include a massive proliferation of television and online channels, the transformation of the home PC into a retail channel, the unrelenting rise of mobile social media and gaming, and—with all these trends—a constant battle for the consumer’s attention.”

“The resulting expansion of platforms has propelled consistent growth in marketing expenditures, which now total as much as $1 trillion globally. The efficacy of this spending is under deep scrutiny. For example, in a survey of CEOs, close to three out of four agreed with the following statement: marketers ‘are always asking for more money, but can rarely explain how much incremental business this money will generate.’ Chief marketing officers (CMOs), it appears, don’t disagree: in another recent survey, just over one-third said they had quantitatively proved the impact of their marketing outlays. Paradoxically, though, CEOs are looking to their CMOs more than ever, because they need top-line growth and view marketing as a critical lever to help them achieve it. Can marketers deliver amid ongoing performance pressures?”

Click the image to read a LOT more.
 

 

Marketing Budgets Report 2015

6 Mar

Marketing budgets in 2015 are expected to grow, in some cases, for the first time in years.

As Nicola Cooper reports for Responsys:

“The Econsultancy Marketing Budgets Report 2015, created in association with Oracle Marketing Cloud, delves into marketers’ expected spend for the coming year and is a great opportunity to see whether you are facing similar challenges to the rest of the industry and inform your priorities for the year.”

“Because a customer’s decision to buy now involves many interactions with a brand, delivering an orchestrated approach is essential for any brand to attract and retain customers. It’s clear that our industry is aware of this; this year’s report indicates that nearly three quarters (74%) of the companies surveyed believe they are working towards delivering unified customer experiences, rather than standalone campaigns or interactions. In addition, 71% of the companies surveyed say that they are focusing on ‘breaking down internal silos to better co-ordinate and integrate [their] marketing efforts’. Marketers are unifying marketing strategy as well as unifying the marketing teams delivering those campaigns.”

“More generally, the findings also indicate that marketers are more likely to be increasing overall budgets for the year ahead than at any time since the launch of our first Marketing Budgets Report in 2010, during the height of the economic crisis. Winning areas include marketing technologies and digital marketing, as a result of stronger boardroom support.”

Click the image to read more.
 

 

See How Well You Can Do on This Entertaining Marketing Quiz

27 Feb

Are you a smart marketer? How smart? :-)

Here’s a fun quiz from Chief Marketer. Click the icon to access: “ARE YOU A PROMOTION MARKETING PRO OR SCHMO? Take this quiz to find out if you are the ultimate Chief PROMO Marketer. Get 5 out of 5 correct and be entered to win either a $25 or $50 Starbucks gift card!”
 

 

Does Rebranding Always Work?

25 Feb

Many times, companies tinker with their logos, their slogans, and other branded materials. They want to “freshen” things up.

Four recent rebrandings (Gap, Starbucks, Vodafone, and AirBnB) are the subject of a recent analysis by Erik Devaney for HubSpot:

” If you’ve ever been part of a company or worked on a product that’s undergone a rebrand, you know how absolutely crazy it can be. From establishing goals, to iterating on designs, to actually implementing your branding changes on your Web site and across all of your marketing channels, it’s a lot of work.”

“I was part of a rebrand at a startup a few years back. The company at the time was shifting direction and targeting a different audience, so a rebrand made sense. We had to come up with a new name, new logo, new  colors  …  new everything! Needless to say, there were a lot of brainstorms, a lot of late nights, and a lot of general craziness right up until we flipped the switch on the new branding.”

 
Click the image to read about rebranding at Gap, Starbucks, Vodafone, and AirBnB.
 

 

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